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Some Jets news 5/ 29/ 08


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Jets' Stuckey made the most of his inactivity

BY ERIK BOLAND | erik.boland@newsday.com

7:19 PM EDT, May 28, 2008

Right around the time Chansi Stuckey started being referred to as a "steal" is when his 2007 season got stolen.

The foot problems that plagued Stuckey, a seventh-round pick of the Jets in 2007, for part of his career at Clemson landed the receiver on the inactive list before the 2007 season opener against New England. He was placed on injured reserve after Week 1, effectively ending his rookie season.

"For anyone not doing something they want to do, it was tough," Stuckey said after Wednesday's OTA practice at Hofstra. "You want to get out there to show what you can do."

The 6-foot, 185-pound Stuckey did that last preseason, finishing the four-game exhibition schedule with 11 receptions, the second-highest total on the team. In the Jets' final exhibition game, a 13-11 victory at Philadelphia, Stuckey caught four passes for 47 yards. He also returned two punts for 50 yards and three kickoffs for 81 yards, including a 33-yarder.

All of that momentum came to an end with his foot injury, but Stuckey impressed his coach and teammates with how he handled the premature finish to a season that never really started.

"For a younger guy, especially a guy who knew every Sunday he wasn't playing, you'd go in there to watch film and he'd be in there watching film," quarterback Kellen Clemens said Wednesday.

Coach Eric Mangini said: "What I liked about Chansi last year is he was very involved the whole time he was not involved. He was diligent in his preparation. He was diligent in trying to stay part of what was happening with the offense. Sometimes you have a guy that goes on IR, especially a young guy, they can get lost. They start the next year and they're no better than they were when they got there."

Which Stuckey was determined not to happen to him. Being a rookie once was plenty.

"The one thing that I didn't want to let happen was to let it be a wasted year. What I tried to do was just go to meetings and learn everything, what was going on every week, see what week-to-week game-planning is like so when I had the opportunity to come back, I didn't want to be behind."

To this point, Stuckey hasn't been. With Brad Smith a limited participant in these OTAs because of an undisclosed injury, Stuckey has been the de facto No. 3 receiver behind Laveranues Coles and Jerricho Cotchery. He has made the most of the chance, showing the precise route-running that made him one of the ACC's top receivers and catching everything thrown his way. And most important, to this point, Stuckey has stayed healthy. Jets players rarely discuss their injury status and Stuckey is no different. But thus far on the field, he doesn't appear limited in any way.

"Look at him out there, he's running against our ones and having success," Clemens said. "At this level you can't do that if you're hindered. He looks pretty good to me."

A good day for Clemens. Chalk up Wednesday to Clemens in the still very early battle for the quarterback position. Clemens, while not quite as sharp as he was last Thursday when the media was last allowed to watch practice, had a good day compared to Chad Pennington. Pennington short-hopped several throws to receivers on out patterns, though the veteran finished the practice strong, tossing a well-thrown, 22-yard strike into the wind to Cotchery in the end zone. Clemens didn't view Pennington's rough day as gaining an early advantage in the race for the starting job.

"Not at all," Clemens said. "We've both missed, and at the same time he threw that beautiful ball down here to Jerricho in the end zone."

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Jets QB battle heating up

Thursday, May 29, 2008

BY DAVE HUTCHINSON

Star-Ledger Staff

HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. -- It's early, but it looks like the Jets might have a bona fide quarterback controversy on their hands once training camp opens this summer.

At the very least, it doesn't appear veteran Chad Pennington will easily beat out third-year pro Kellen Clemens.

Working with the first team in front of the media yesterday at Hofstra University, Clemens was sharp once again while Pennington struggled with the second team. Clemens was on target last week during a session with the first team as well.

The fact that Pennington was working with the second team undoubtedly had a lot to do with his off day, but on several occasions, he simply made bad throws. Today, Pennington will work with the first team in the final OTA (organized team activities) session open to the media.

The reps have been split 50-50, coach Eric Mangini said. The Jets' mandatory minicamp runs June 5-7.

Clemens, who didn't see wide receiver Wallace Wright running free down the middle of the field on one play for a sure touchdown, attributes his improved accuracy to a rigorous offseason that included repeated drills with an "accuracy net." The net, he said, is about 5 feet long and 6-to-7 feet wide and has small pockets or targets on it.

Clemens said he also concentrated on his footwork and studied hours of film. He says he now has a definitive plan or "road map" on how to improve.

Mangini said offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer and quarterback coach Brian Daboll have put together what amounts to a small novel on each quarterback on the roster, instructing them on what they need to improve on.

"I had a pretty productive offseason," Clemens said yesterday. "Accuracy was one of the areas I wanted to work on. It's nice to see the things I was working on in February, March and April showing up on the field. That, to me, is encouraging.

"Throwing for a quarterback starts from the ground up. You evaluate your feet. I did a lot of film work, not only on myself but on some of the other top quarterbacks in the league, kind of comparing and contrasting, trying to take little bits from the things that they do."

Clemens said he has been careful not to throw out his arm.

Mangini said LB Vernon Gholston, the team's first-round pick, can join the Jets June 6. He has been unable to do so because his class at Ohio State hasn't completed the semester.

CB Justin Miller, who missed nearly all of last season with a knee injury, worked with the first team opposite Darrell Revis, replacing David Barrett. Surprisingly, free agent CB Andre Woolfork practiced with the second team alongside Barrett. ... Third-year SS Eric Smith continues to run with the first team. ... Clemens and Brad Smith are working as holders, a job held by veteran punter Ben Graham the past few seasons. Graham, 32, is battling first-year pro Jeremy Kapinos for the punting job.

Mangini refused to shoot down reports that the team has shown interest in former Patriots LB Rosevelt Colvin, who recently said on Sirus Radio that the Jets and Browns have contacted his agent.

Colvin played five seasons in New England and was released this offseason. He spent three seasons there with Mangini.

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Jets' Faneca discusses life with epilepsy

May 28, 2008

HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. (AP) -Alan Faneca remembers waking up in the middle of the night, scared and unsure of what was wrong with his body.

He was 15 and in his freshman year of high school, and his first epileptic seizure had just jolted him out of his sleep on Christmas Eve.

"It just felt like a nightmare," the New York Jets' left guard recalled Wednesday. "I was upset and crying and it just really felt like a really bad nightmare. I didn't know what was going on."

Faneca's parents rushed to their son, also unaware of what was happening.

"I was just like, 'Oh, it's just a nightmare. It's just a bad dream,"' Faneca said. "Maybe a day or two later, I had another one, so then we realized it was definitely time to seek medical attention."

Faneca underwent several tests, which revealed that he was among the 3 million Americans who have epilepsy. It is a neurological condition that occasionally produces brief disturbances in the normal electrical functions of the brain, according to the National Epilepsy Foundation.

"I take six pills a day, even now," he said. "As long as I'm on my medication, I'm fine."

Faneca, who hasn't had a seizure in several years, refused to let the condition prevent him from becoming a star offensive lineman at LSU, and then a Super Bowl-winning, seven-time Pro Bowl guard with the Pittsburgh Steelers.

"It's a little bit of a shocker when you're in high school and all of the sudden, you find out, epilepsy, and boom," the 31-year-old Faneca said. "All of the sudden, you get to quality-of-life questions and then you get to sports. I was able and capable of doing anything I wanted before I found out, so it was just a matter of taking my medication."

Faneca talks openly about the condition, and has helped bring awareness to it by appearing at charity events and benefit walks.

"The mere fact that Alan is able and willing to speak up about his epilepsy makes a huge difference to those of us who have epilepsy," former National Epilepsy Foundation chairman Tony Coelho said.

Coelho, who also lives with epilepsy, is a former congressman from California and the primary author and sponsor of the Americans with Disabilities Act. He has known Faneca for five years and they have worked together in trying to eliminate the stigma attached to epilepsy.

"There are so many people whose families don't want to acknowledge their epilepsy," Coelho said. "Alan has become a wonderful role model and spokesperson for our cause. He's been very open about it and never hid it. As a result of his openness, he has impacted other players."

One of those is Baltimore Ravens cornerback Samari Rolle, who missed time last season while dealing with epileptic seizures. He revealed his condition in November, in part because he was comforted by knowing Faneca also has it.

"He's had epilepsy since he was 15 and he's probably the best guard in football," Rolle said at the time. "I feel very good knowing what I know now."

Faneca and Rolle aren't the only big-name athletes who have dealt with epilepsy, a group that includes Hall of Fame pitcher Grover Cleveland Alexander, Hall of Fame second baseman Tony Lazzeri, former Olympic gold medalist Florence Griffith-Joyner and former baseball All-Star and manager Buddy Bell.

"I had a really good support group," Faneca said. "I had my family and I had great doctors and everybody was upbeat and positive and very much so that I was going to get back to my normal way of life."

He did briefly fear that football wouldn't be an option until his doctor reassured him.

"My doctor, he said it so fast that everything was fine that I had to say, 'Hold on a second. Do you know what football is?"' he said. "He knew what football was, but he just said it so fast. It was like, 'All right.' If the doc is saying it in a matter of a split-second, then there's nothing to worry about."

There certainly wasn't, based on the success he's had on the field.

In his first season with the Jets after 10 with the Steelers, Faneca is already largely viewed as the key member of a revamped offensive line. The Jets signed him to a five-year, $40 million contract, with $21 million in guarantees, making Faneca the highest-paid offensive lineman in NFL history.

"I'm going to come in here and be me," he said. "I'm going to come out here and play hard and, at the same time, even though I haven't been here for the last 10 years, I have to earn the respect from the guys in the locker room and become a leader."

For many Americans living with epilepsy, Faneca is already much more.

"To have someone who's an All-Pro speak about it so openly, young people look up to him and it makes a difference in their lives," Coelho said. "They say, 'If Alan has epilepsy and he's been able to do what he's done, then there's no reason I can't do things, too."'

---

AP Sports Writer David Ginsburg in Owings Mills, Md., contributed to this report.

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JONES PUTS JETS' FUTURE ON THE LINE

By DAN MARTIN

May 29, 2008 -- Thomas JonesThomas Jones was brought in last year to anchor the JetsNew York Jets ' running game, and after a season in which he rushed for 1,119 yards but only one touchdown, the spotlight will again be on him - especially after the team signed linemen Alan Faneca and Damien Woody.

"I'm ready to run behind whoever is in front of me," Jones said after another organized team activity (OTA) yesterday. "I'm looking forward to playing behind those guys, because I've seen what they can do."

But Jones is now part of a crowded backfield that became even more cluttered this week with the signing of former Raven Musa Smith, who, along with the returning Leon WashingtonLeon Washington and newcomer Jesse Chatman, could all vie for carries.

"That doesn't affect me at all," Jones said of the number of running backs in camp. "My job is to be prepared. I'm not here to establish anything. I'll do whatever they ask me to do."

Faneca, the team's new left guard, has liked what he's seen so far. "He runs hard and does a good job finding the hole," he said.

It will be up to Faneca and the rest of the line to create those holes for Jones while learning the system brought in by Bill Callahan, the team's new offensive line coach.

"We're laying the groundwork," Faneca said. "Everybody's learning new things, so I don't feel that far behind. I can just be me and play hard."

*

With the QB "competition" still far from over, Chad Pennington and Kellen Clemens split snaps yesterday, with Clemens looking sharper and Pennington coming up short on several throws.

But with more than three months before the regular season begins, Eric Mangini reiterated yesterday that there was no "timetable" in place for him to make a decision regarding the starter.

Clemens added that he is seeing the results of his offseason program that was designed to improve his accuracy.

*

Mangini said that first-round pick Vernon Gholston, still at Ohio State, will be with the Jets next Friday for the team's mini-camp.

"You'd love to have him here, but there's nothing we can do about it," Mangini said of the rules that prohibit players from attending OTAs before finishing school. "It's not ideal for him, for us, for anybody."

Also on the LB front, former Patriot Rosevelt Colvin told Sirius Radio that the Jets were interested in bringing him in.

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Tight end Franks makes adjustments as a Jet

By Jane McManus

The Journal News • May 29, 2008

HEMPSTEAD - When practice was over at the Jets' facility on the Hofstra University campus, Bubba Franks and Kellen Clemens walked over to the far side of the football field.

After missing on a pass earlier, the two started informally running a few patterns to get the rhythm down. When they finished, Franks jogged to the ball machine to catch a few more passes, and on the way passed by defensive coordinator Bob Sutton.

"I studied that defense last week," Franks called out, and the two talked strategy for a few minutes as most other players headed for the locker.

Franks has been a tight end in the NFL for eight seasons but, in his first year with the Jets, he has a lot of learning to do. The former Packer is in the process of learning to read the 3-4 defense he will often encounter in the AFC, and gaining inspiration from everything from the playbook to the Lakers game he watched Wednesday night.

"You see a basketball player make a move and you say, 'Maybe I can use this move on that play,' and then you're studying again," the 6-foot-6, 265-pound Franks said.

The idea, he said, is to do so much reading and thinking that when he is on the field watching the plays unfold, instinct takes over.

"That's one big thing that separates just guys from great guys," Franks said. "If you can recognize it as well as the quarterback does then you're way ahead of the game."

Franks played for the University of Miami - his two children still live in Florida - and was the 14th overall pick in the 2000 draft. He has 32 career receiving touchdowns and has 2,300 yards on 256 catches.

The Jets signed the 30-year-old Franks to a one-year contract. Since two of his last three years at Green Bay were marred by injuries, the three-time Pro Bowl selection has to pull all the pieces together and make a play for a starting spot.

"Bubba's doing a nice job," Jets coach Eric Mangini said. "He was in one system for his whole career and now he's learning another system, and I think he's doing a good job with the information. He's doing a good job with the different spots we've asked him to play. He's got a lot of reps, which is positive ... I think he'll be in a much better position when we go to training camp to be in the best spot possible to continue to compete."

Franks is one of several veterans acquired during the offseason, and last year's roster players are giving them the benefit of the doubt, at least publicly.

"Just seeing them out here on the field, their work ethic, the way they go about practice, meetings," running back Thomas Jones said. "If they haven't played in the Super Bowl, they played in the playoffs, so they know what it takes to win."

That's certainly the kind of stardust the Jets would like to see settle over the entire team.

Note: Danny Woodhead, the Division II running back from Chadron State, spent yesterday trying out various special-teams jobs, such as returning punts. Now that the Jets signed Musa Smith at the position, the undrafted free agent will need to find someplace to fit in if he wants to be on the roster come September.

Reach Jane McManus at jmcmanus@lohud.com and read her Jets blog at jets.lohudblogs.com.

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By the book: Jets' quarterback competition is page-turner

BY RICH CIMINI

DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER

Wednesday, May 28th 2008, 8:25 PM

Chad Pennington (l.) and Kellen Clemens have a lot of reading to do thanks to their coaches.

Instead of replacing their quarterbacks this offseason, the Jets threw the book at them.

When Chad Pennington and Kellen Clemens reported March 17 to the offseason program, they received an in-depth, individualized evaluation from the coaching staff. Picture a report card on steroids. Each one includes a specific breakdown of last season's performance, plus a list of offseason objectives and ways to improve in 2008.

"It's certainly the most detailed and most thorough book I've ever received in the offseason," Pennington said Wednesday at Hofstra, calling the tome a "player makeover edition."

Inside those pages could be the keys to the Jets' ballyhooed quarterback competition, which began three weeks ago with the start of spring practices. The player who heeds the criticism and shows the most improvement is likely to emerge as the starting quarterback.

"There's a destination in mind, and there's definitely a road map on how to get there," Clemens said of his personalized Book of Kells, about 15 centuries newer than the original that resides in Dublin.

The voluminous evaluations are the handiwork of quarterbacks coach Brian Daboll, who received input from offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer. Eric Mangini said Daboll is obsessed with detail, joking that the Jets' second-year assistant still has notes from third grade.

Each quarterback is evaluated in 37 categories, according to Pennington - everything from throws to the left, throws to the right, throws over 15 yards and various third-down situations. Pennington admitted he doesn't agree with every critique, but he said the coaches are open to discussion.

It started in mid-March, with each quarterback receiving an individualized booklet for his three-ring binder. Since then, the binders have grown thicker, looking like a small-town phone book. Each week, they are required to chart their progress, adding to the girth.

"There are many chapters," Clemens said.

The Jets have gone to great lengths to portray the competition as a dead heat, so Mangini wasn't about to reveal which quarterback has the bigger book, lest he provide a clue as to which player has the most criticisms.

"I don't know if size totally matters," said Mangini, cracking a smile.

After eight practices, the competition has unfolded as expected. In the three sessions open to the media, Clemens has outperformed Pennington, who struggled yesterday on routine 15- and 20-yard out patterns.

Of course, these practices, sans pads and contact, amount to little more than throwing contests, and that never has been Pennington's strength. He's at his best in the crucible of a game.

That is Clemens' challenge: prove he can manage the game as well as Pennington. But he can't be accurately graded in that area until there is live action.

Clemens' goal is to become a more accurate passer than last season (52% percent completion rate), and he spent the late-winter months firing passes at targets on an indoor net.

"It's nice to see the things I worked on in February, March and April showing up on the field," he said. "That, to me, is encouraging."

IT'S ACADEMIC: OLB Vernon Gholston, the Jets' top pick, won't report until June 6 due to school obligations at Ohio State. ... Contrary to a report, the Jets have no interest in former Patriots LB Rosevelt Colvin.

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explains his philosophy of "putting plays into context" for 5 minutes

- re: rule change, no force outs anymore. wont make a difference in his opinion since the players wont be thinking about the rule while trying to make a play

- musa smith. can/will play special teams. backup rb and fb.

- not concerned about gholston missing time. cant do anything about it

- colvins mom makes great cakes, "food flexibility"

- bubba franks doing a nice job, gets lots of reps, learns system

- faneca & damion are good leaders

- gives props to bill callahan, new line calls

- "communication" a key thing (orly?)

- dave hutchinson struggles to get the question out of his mouth

- clemens' deep balls were impressive in mini camp

- QBs received a book that explains what exactly they need to work on

- some dumb question by a chick ("did the coaches write it by hand or did they type it?")

- another dumb question by the same chick, mangini answers the book is quite "thick"

- conversation gets gay. some wannabe comedian then asked "who has the biggest book", mangini answers "size doesnt matter" (saw that one coming a mile down the road)

- dumb chick giggles

- brian baldinger goes back to topic, asks question about kris jenkins and the DT to NT transition, mangini says there is a transition from penetrating (DT) to the 2 gap system (NT)

- hutchinson wants to know about baker, mangini hasnt talked to him yet, will text him tonight/tomorrow

- hutchinson doesnt know how to text (and talk)

- chansi stuckey was very involved even when he landed on IR

- praised jason trusnik for looking at the bigger picture and trying to make the team instead of signing with somebody else where he would have received more money but probably not a roster spot. has an outstanding motor, will make progress, fun guy

- some guy wants to know how long they could afford to wait before naming a starting QB. mangini answers "doesnt matter, both guys receive the same amount of reps". theres no timetable, they will announce the starting QB when they feel the time is right

posted by DABALLHAWK on JI

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MANGINI NOT WORRIED ABOUT GHOLSTON

TOP PICK WON'T ARRIVE FOR ANOTHER WEEK

Post Staff Report

JetsNew York Jets coach Eric Mangini is keeping first-round pick Vernon Gholston up to date until he arrives late next week.

May 28, 2008 --

Eric Mangini said today he

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N.Y. Times Article, "A scientific look at Jets"

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

May 28, 2008, 6:08 pm

A Football Scientist Looks at the Jets

By Greg Bishop

Tags: Jets

As ESPN’s “Football Scientist,” K.C. Joyner uses statistics to analyze the N.F.L.

On Wednesday, he spent time with The Fifth Down, sharing some Jets-related numbers from his next book, “Scientific Football 2008.”

More of Joyner’s work can be found at thefootballscientist.com.

Of Chris Baker, the Jets’ disgruntled tight end, who is skipping voluntary organized team activities in a contract dispute, Joyner said: “A better receiving tight end than he’s given credit for.”

Joyner looked at how tight ends performed when flexed out as wide receivers. Of the 60 passes thrown at Baker last season, 43 fit into that category. Baker has long been considered an excellent blocker, but he also averaged 7.5 yards per attempt flexed wide last season – tied for 13th in the N.F.L. with the Giants’ Jeremy Shockey.

For comparison, the Colts threw 62 passes to Dallas Clark in similar situations last season, while the Patriots threw 27 such passes to Ben Watson and the Packers threw three times to Bubba Franks flexed wide. The Jets signed Franks this offseason as Baker’s backup.

“I’m surprised that Baker’s numbers were that good,” Joyner said. “They were much better than anticipated.”

The Jets drafted a receiving tight end, Dustin Keller from Purdue, late in the first round, a move Joyner called “solving a problem that doesn’t seem to be there.”

Of the Jets quarterbacks competing for the starting job, Chad Pennington and Kellen Clemens, Joyner said: “Clemens always seems get the benefit of the doubt. Pennington does not.”

The numbers, Joyner said, suggest the opposite. Clemens averaged more yards per attempt (6.1 to 5.8) on short passes (1-10 yards) last season. Pennington, who is supposed to have the weaker arm of the two, averaged more yards per attempt (8.9 to 8.8) on medium passes (11-19 yards), more yards per attempt (11.3 to 8.7) on deep passes (20-29 yards) and more yards per attempt (22.8 to 12.3) on the longest passes (30-plus yards).

Joyner also compiled a table of bad decisions, or how often a quarterback makes a mistake that leads to a turnover of a near turnover. Examples include forcing a pass into coverage, or throwing the ball away while being tackled. Both quarterbacks had 10 of those plays last season, according to Joyner’s calculations.

Joyner counted how many of the pair’s passes were nearly intercepted. Clemens had 14 passes, Pennington 12.

“There is no metric measure last year where Kellen Clemens was a better quarterback than Chad Pennington,” Joyner said.

Of the Jets’ defense, specifically its ability to create bad decisions by opposing quarterbacks, Joyner said: “They did better than expected.”

The Jets’ defense created bad decisions on 15 plays in 515 attempts last season (Joyner eliminates spike plays and sacks for this particular analysis). That was good enough for 17th in the league.

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Baker has long been considered an excellent blocker
???

The numbers, Joyner said, suggest the opposite. Clemens averaged more yards per attempt (6.1 to 5.8) on short passes (1-10 yards) last season. Pennington, who is supposed to have the weaker arm of the two, averaged more yards per attempt (8.9 to 8.8) on medium passes (11-19 yards), more yards per attempt (11.3 to 8.7) on deep passes (20-29 yards) and more yards per attempt (22.8 to 12.3) on the longest passes (30-plus yards).

This is where people get too wrapped up in stats & use them to infer things they do not infer. Whether 6.1 vs 5.8 in Clemens' favor is anyone's opinion as to how significant that is, since the down & yards to go are not considered & those #'s are pretty damn close. 8.9 vs 8.8 is dead-even. Is 10cm really considered an edge? The last #'s (particularly the 30+ numbers) aren't statistically significant since I doubt Pennington threw more than 5 all season. You complete one 50-yard pass when there's a breakdown in coverage and all of a sudden your deep "average attempt" is off the charts. If there was really an expectation of averaging 23 yards on all 30+ yard attempts, Schottenheimer would have called in that play 10x per game.

But the biggest flaw in those stats (no matter whose favor they fall into) is it counts yards-after-the catch in those pass plays. A dumpoff to Leon behind the line of scrimmage, that he runs 35 yards with, is considered among the "longest passes" when you stupidly break down stats like that. So if a dumpoff only goes 6 yards, it doesn't get recorded in the "deep pass" category as a "misfire" - but if a dumpoff goes 30-40 yards, then it's counted as a successful deep pass (as in 1-for-1 on that play type) that skews the stats.

If he watched & recorded every one of them by how far the ball traveled from the line of scrimmage, I'm sure the numbers for both QB's would look different. No matter which QB you "favor" I wouldn't put any credence into any of these numbers other than they were both about dead-even (both within 0.2 yds of 6.0 yards per attempt) on short passes. Whoop-dee-do. Anything beyond that, you don't know how far the ball traveled in the air; only how many yards the play went for. Not at all the same thing and ends up inferring things it does not infer.

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???

This is where people get too wrapped up in stats & use them to infer things they do not infer. Whether 6.1 vs 5.8 in Clemens' favor is anyone's opinion as to how significant that is, since the down & yards to go are not considered & those #'s are pretty damn close. 8.9 vs 8.8 is dead-even. Is 10cm really considered an edge? The last #'s (particularly the 30+ numbers) aren't statistically significant since I doubt Pennington threw more than 5 all season. You complete one 50-yard pass when there's a breakdown in coverage and all of a sudden your deep "average attempt" is off the charts. If there was really an expectation of averaging 23 yards on all 30+ yard attempts, Schottenheimer would have called in that play 10x per game.

But the biggest flaw in those stats (no matter whose favor they fall into) is it counts yards-after-the catch in those pass plays. A dumpoff to Leon behind the line of scrimmage, that he runs 35 yards with, is considered among the "longest passes" when you stupidly break down stats like that. So if a dumpoff only goes 6 yards, it doesn't get recorded in the "deep pass" category as a "misfire" - but if a dumpoff goes 30-40 yards, then it's counted as a successful deep pass (as in 1-for-1 on that play type) that skews the stats.

If he watched & recorded every one of them by how far the ball traveled from the line of scrimmage, I'm sure the numbers for both QB's would look different. No matter which QB you "favor" I wouldn't put any credence into any of these numbers other than they were both about dead-even (both within 0.2 yds of 6.0 yards per attempt) on short passes. Whoop-dee-do. Anything beyond that, you don't know how far the ball traveled in the air; only how many yards the play went for. Not at all the same thing and ends up inferring things it does not infer.

I am sure that we are all aware that statistics don't lie, but liars use statistics. IMo we just should take articles like this and read it and move on. Who knows what or who the author favors?

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I am sure that we are all aware that statistics don't lie, but liars use statistics. IMo we just should take articles like this and read it and move on. Who knows what or who the author favors?

i thought the author was biased towards penny. Only then would someone say how his .2 is better than a first year starter in his first 8 games. Sort of sad that their numbers are this comparable and Penny is going into his 8th season.

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i thought the author was biased towards penny. Only then would someone say how his .2 is better than a first year starter in his first 8 games. Sort of sad that their numbers are this comparable and Penny is going into his 8th season.

Well actually when you think about it with all the games he's missed its like Pennington is going into his 5th or 6th season. ;-)

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I'm looking forward to hearing how Gholston goes against brick, in terms of pass rush. Brick is pretty average so i hope to read about gholston wearing him down, i guess i'll wait and see.

I'm even more interested to hear if there is going to be a good competition between Gholston and Harris to be the elite linebacker in the unit.

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Jets' Stuckey made the most of his inactivity

BY ERIK BOLAND | erik.boland@newsday.com

7:19 PM EDT, May 28, 2008

Right around the time Chansi Stuckey started being referred to as a "steal" is when his 2007 season got stolen.

The foot problems that plagued Stuckey, a seventh-round pick of the Jets in 2007, for part of his career at Clemson landed the receiver on the inactive list before the 2007 season opener against New England. He was placed on injured reserve after Week 1, effectively ending his rookie season.

"For anyone not doing something they want to do, it was tough," Stuckey said after Wednesday's OTA practice at Hofstra. "You want to get out there to show what you can do."

The 6-foot, 185-pound Stuckey did that last preseason, finishing the four-game exhibition schedule with 11 receptions, the second-highest total on the team. In the Jets' final exhibition game, a 13-11 victory at Philadelphia, Stuckey caught four passes for 47 yards. He also returned two punts for 50 yards and three kickoffs for 81 yards, including a 33-yarder.

All of that momentum came to an end with his foot injury, but Stuckey impressed his coach and teammates with how he handled the premature finish to a season that never really started.

"For a younger guy, especially a guy who knew every Sunday he wasn't playing, you'd go in there to watch film and he'd be in there watching film," quarterback Kellen Clemens said Wednesday.

Coach Eric Mangini said: "What I liked about Chansi last year is he was very involved the whole time he was not involved. He was diligent in his preparation. He was diligent in trying to stay part of what was happening with the offense. Sometimes you have a guy that goes on IR, especially a young guy, they can get lost. They start the next year and they're no better than they were when they got there."

Which Stuckey was determined not to happen to him. Being a rookie once was plenty.

"The one thing that I didn't want to let happen was to let it be a wasted year. What I tried to do was just go to meetings and learn everything, what was going on every week, see what week-to-week game-planning is like so when I had the opportunity to come back, I didn't want to be behind."

To this point, Stuckey hasn't been. With Brad Smith a limited participant in these OTAs because of an undisclosed injury, Stuckey has been the de facto No. 3 receiver behind Laveranues Coles and Jerricho Cotchery. He has made the most of the chance, showing the precise route-running that made him one of the ACC's top receivers and catching everything thrown his way. And most important, to this point, Stuckey has stayed healthy. Jets players rarely discuss their injury status and Stuckey is no different. But thus far on the field, he doesn't appear limited in any way.

"Look at him out there, he's running against our ones and having success," Clemens said. "At this level you can't do that if you're hindered. He looks pretty good to me."

A good day for Clemens. Chalk up Wednesday to Clemens in the still very early battle for the quarterback position. Clemens, while not quite as sharp as he was last Thursday when the media was last allowed to watch practice, had a good day compared to Chad Pennington. Pennington short-hopped several throws to receivers on out patterns, though the veteran finished the practice strong, tossing a well-thrown, 22-yard strike into the wind to Cotchery in the end zone. Clemens didn't view Pennington's rough day as gaining an early advantage in the race for the starting job.

"Not at all," Clemens said. "We've both missed, and at the same time he threw that beautiful ball down here to Jerricho in the end zone."

This is the guy I've been excited about ever since we drafted him. If he can stay healthy I see no reason why Stuckey can't be a dynamic, play making speedy #3 slot receiver, and obviously the Jets feel the same way. If they didn't hold Stuckey in high praises there would have been a speedy slot receiver taken early in the Draft.

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This is the guy I've been excited about ever since we drafted him. If he can stay healthy I see no reason why Stuckey can't be a dynamic, play making speedy #3 slot receiver, and obviously the Jets feel the same way. If they didn't hold Stuckey in high praises there would have been a speedy slot receiver taken early in the Draft.

I agree

If this kid can stay healthy I predict he will be the surprise player of the year.

Not sure where this will leave Brad Smith

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