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Jets rusher Washington as versatile as consistent-BY KATIE STRANG | NEWSDAY-caitlin.strang@newsday.com

November 1, 2008

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. - For all the talk about the Jets' offensive inconsistency and lack of identity, running back Leon Washington has been a bastion of consistent contribution for the team.

Washington, who had 274 all-purpose yards and two touchdowns in the Jets' 28-24 win over Kansas City last week, has used his speed and elusiveness to punish opponents, not only as a running back but as the team's return specialist. "Well, I think it's consistency, but it's also versatility," coach Eric Mangini said. "He does consistently contribute, but the areas are different each week."

Washington was used in practically every element of the Jets' offense last week, tallying the first two scores of the game, on an 18-yard reception in the first quarter and a 60-yard run up the middle that gave the Jets a 14-7 lead in the second.

"When I can help the team, whether it's me touching the ball one time or a hundred times, I'm going to take advantage of making the play," Washington said. "If I get the ball five times, I'm going to try to score five times."

On special teams, Washington made a dent as well, netting 173 return yards, including a 37-yard punt return in the fourth quarter that gave the Jets good field position for a drive that ended in the go-ahead touchdown."I'd rather have a really good game on the kick [return] part," Washington said, "because a lot of teams overlook that part of the game, and it can give a team so much momentum and put our offense in good field position."

Notes & quotes: Mike Nugent, Eric Smith, Bubba Franks and David Harris did not practice Friday. Nugent and Smith are out for Sunday; Franks and Harris are doubtful. Chris Baker and Cody Spencer were limited in practice and were listed as questionable. Laveranues Coles and Jerricho Cotchery were limited but are probable. Buffalo's Josh Reed and Aaron Schobel did not practice and are out for Sunday.

Sunday

Jets at Buffalo

1 p.m.

TV: Ch. 2

Radio: WEPN (1050)

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Recco Report: Jets v. Bills Preview

Jerry Recco

jets@wfan.com

New York, NY (WFAN) -- Can you say statement game? When the Jets play the Bills in Orchard Park on Sunday, they will either leave tied with the Bills for 2nd place, tied with the Bills & Patriots for 1st place, or they will be heading home with their tail between their legs at 4-4.

Let's look at the matchup. First and foremost, the Jets defense (likely without David Harris because of a groin injury) has got to get to Trent Edwards. The Jets head into this game, ranked 3rd in the NFL in sacks with 24. Only the Giants (26) and Steelers (25) have more. If they don't sack Edwards they HAVE to knock him down.

Second key point will be the play in the secondary. Darrelle Revis, Dwight Lowery, David Barrett and Hank Poteat will have their hands full with Lee Evans and Roscoe Parrish. They cannot allow the big play, plus they'll need to help the front seven in run defense. Marshawn Lynch is not having a great season but he is still very capable of having a great day.

Two major points on the offensive side of the ball-- Brett Favre and the offensive line. Favre has a chance to put his stamp on this team and this division race if he can have a productive, mistake-free game. It is obvious that Favre can move this team up and down the field but he needs to finish drives and has to stop throwing interceptions.

As for the offensive line....no Aaron Schobel for the Bills. That is a huge loss and likely a big relief for D'Brickashaw Ferguson. Keep Favre upright, give him time and the Jets will score a lot of points. Throw a steady dose of Thomas Jones & Leon Washington into the mix and the Jets could, again I say could, turn into what we believed they'd be when they acquired #4, explosive.

Special teams. To me, this category is owned by the Jets because of Leon Washington. Jay Feely has been spotty (to be kind) but Washington has more than made up for it with his dynamic kick returns and unbelievable punt returns. Plus, the punt & kick coverage teams are tremendous. Ahmad Carroll has quietly done a wonderful job getting downfield and making big plays.

All of that said, I think there are too many if's and could be's and maybe's. I said I wouldn't predict scores anymore (because I'm lousy at it) but I do think the Bills will win a close game. I think the Jets will play ok, but will ultimately fall short which will leave us with a thrilling day in Florham Park on Monday, talking to a 4-4 team that has a miserable schedule ahead. Let me rephrase, it will leave us talking to the two or three players that actually make an appearance in the locker-room on Monday following a difficult loss.

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New York Jets' Rhodes says Jets will be fine, despite tough schedule

by M.A. Mehta/The Star-Ledger

Friday October 31, 2008, 8:23 PM

Jim McIsaac/Getty Images

Jets safety Kerry Rhodes isn't scared of the tough upcoming schedule, and says the way things are in the AFC, "We have a chance.''Kerry Rhodes delivered a simple message for all the number-crunching stat geeks terrified at the absolutely brutal stretch that awaits the Jets:

We're still in the hunt.

In a topsy-turvy league sprinkled with weekly surprises, the Jets safety isn't breaking into a cold sweat in the middle of the night wondering just how his team is going to survive the next four games filled with tough opponents.

Coming off the easy portion of their schedule -- the Jets went 2-1 against three teams with a combined 3-19 record -- Eric Mangini's club embarks upon a much tougher task beginning with a road test against the AFC East-leading Buffalo Bills (5-2) Sunday.

"The whole NFL is crazy right now," Rhodes said. "Especially in the AFC. We've got a lot of teams that can get on a roll (and) can take over this division. We have a chance. As bad as everybody thinks we're playing right now, we're still in the mix. So we're not that bad off."

The Jets (4-3), who could grab a share of the division lead with a win and a Patriots loss to the Colts, won't have any free lunches in the next few weeks. After Buffalo, they face the resurgent St. Louis Rams, who have found new life under interim coach Jim Haslett. Then it's a pair of road games against division foe New England, who beat them in Week 2, and the undefeated Tennessee Titans.

The combined record of the next four opponents? 19-9.

"We got a tough schedule," said cornerback Darrelle Revis. "Right now, we just need to focus on this game. When Monday comes, then (we'll think about) whoever we play next week."

To complicate matters, the Jets have made a weekly habit out of losing the turnover battle. They have forced just one turnover in the past three games after having seven takeaways against the Cardinals in Week 4. The Jets are minus-8 in the giveaway-takeaway ratio in the past three weeks even though they've put plenty of pressure on opposing quarterbacks.

But that hasn't translated into turnovers.

From feeding the defensive backs balls from the Jugs machine to hammering home the importance of grabbing the point of the ball and yanking it away from ballcarriers, the coaches have stressed the importance of getting out of the funk. Defensive coordinator Bob Sutton believes it's simply a matter of hustle.

"The most common way to generate (turnovers) is to go hard to the ball," Sutton said. "You need to be full speed to the ball. Because there's opportunities out there. Keep pressing and going to the ball -- don't relax. Because there's going to be a ball that's on the ground. There's going to be a ball that's tipped in the air. A lot of times, (players) are going, but instead of being at 100 mph, they're at 90 mph -- if you want to make those plays, you got to go (100)."

Revis wasn't overly concerned about risking big plays by being too aggressive.

"If you see a play, try and make one," Revis said. "I don't think we are trying to force it as DBs. I haven't seen one of us on film go for an interception and miss it and a guy catches it and starts running. For us, it's just getting back to the basics."

The bottom line, of course, is picking up their second division win.

"I'm just curious to see if we can beat one of those (good) teams," Rhodes said. "We've had games to prove ourselves and we didn't get it done against New England and San Diego. So we have another chance against Buffalo -- a chance to see where we match up."

For the Bills, WR Josh Reed (ankle), DE Aaron Schobel (foot) and G Brad Butler (knee) are out.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Jets must ask what needs fixing/Is Schotty holding back?

Road test against Bills will challenge team that has struggled

By Michael Salfino / SNY.tv

Trent Edwards may have the upper hand in his matchup with Brett Favre on Sunday in Orchard Park, N.Y. (AP)

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The Jets are somehow 4-3 and get a chance to finally step up in weight class versus the 5-2 Bills in Orchard Park, N.Y. That's the same Bills team that regularly has its way with the Jets even when struggling. Buffalo has won three straight and five of seven.

And this is a Jets team that was life-and-death last week at home against a terrible Kansas City team playing its third-string quarterback, Tyler Thigpen, who looked like vintage Len Dawson against the Jets' beleaguered defense. Now Boomer Esiason and many others in the media, with the tacit approval of Eric Mangini, are laying the team's woes at the feet of Brett Favre. That is absurd.

It's fair to say that Mangini is not altering this storyline because he spent yesterday explaining to reporters how he's working with Favre to not be such a gambler. Hey, Eric, maybe Favre wouldn't have to gamble so much if your offense, and especially your passing game, wasn't so completely and pathetically predictable.

Before we throw Favre under the bus, let's present the case against Mangini, legacy hire Brian Schottenheimer and whoever else has their finger in this putrefying offense pie.

Exhibit A is Chad Pennington. Sorry, Chad, for blaming you and your weakened wing for the Jets utter lack of any playmaking in the passing game since Mangini and Schottenheimer came on board. I assumed they saw you in practice and came up with that dunk-and-dink offense out of necessity. Who could imagine this is the way they think you should try to score in today's game?

There was evidence that Pennington could throw the ball downfield in 2006. And this year, he's proven that it's not him, it's them (Schottenheimer and Mangini) by going down to Miami (who are their receivers, exactly?) and ranking second in the NFL in yard per pass attempt (YPA). Favre is 20th, meanwhile. And those picks? Pennington tosses them on 1.4% of attempts (fourth-best) while Favre is a league-worst 4.98%.

Last year in New York, Pennington was 20th in YPA and 19th in interception percentage. If it's not the fault of the underlying offense, there sure are a lot of remarkable coincidences here. I don't believe in remarkable coincidences and neither should the Jets' brain trust (for lack of a better term).

I'm going to say it one more time, with feeling: Fire Brian Schottenheimer. If Mangini won't do it, broom him, too. Time is running out on this season. If the Jets weren't lucky enough to catch the Dolphins in transition in Week 1 (notice how Miami has gotten better and the Jets have not), New York would be 3-4 in what we all can agree is the easy part of its schedule.

But Esiason gets on the radio and talks to the Daily News this week and says that it's Mangini who is being victimized by Favre and that if Favre were any other quarterback, he'd have been benched by now. How completely absurd. Pennington is playing as well as any other quarterback in the league right now removed from this system. Last year, he stunk in it. Favre was close to vintage last year and is one of the top five or ten quarterbacks in league history and this year he's struggling mightily (sans the Cardinals game). Case closed.

Mangini needs to look in the mirror, too, with this defense that's not fooling anyone. Yes, they're getting to the quarterback. But the team is 20th in interception percentage. And that's playing a slate of passers that's included Matt Cassel, Ryan Fitzpatrick, JaMarcus Russell and Thigpen. If you can't force these novices into mistakes, what good are you?

The Jets actually moved up a little last week to 25th overall in my Stat Power Rankings, which factors in only the four stats that most correlate to winning: net YPA, net red-zone possessions, net third-down percentage and net interception rate.

In contrast, the Bills are 12th. Yes, they are overrated by the punditry. The numbers don't back up their claim to being a serious contender. What Miami did to them last week was no great surprise.

The formula I use that to create a point spread has worked out perfectly the last two weeks. Of course, we ignored it when it said the Raiders were going to win by two-to-three points in Oakland. Last week, it predicted a five-point Jets win (they won by four). This week, it says Bills by eight. The Vegas line is 5 1/2 to six depending on where you look. This difference comes down to Favre vs. Trent Edwards. But I have to discount this Favre factor until I see evidence beyond the occasional play that the design of the Jets offense is up to professional standards.

A start would be getting Leon Washington some more touches. I'm tired of yelling about this, but it is malpractice that he can't even consistently find 10 or 15 touches. We have years of evidence that he can be a Brian Westbrook-type and Westbrook is only the best back in the NFL. The evidence that he can't be? There isn't any; it's all speculation relating to his size (and he's the same exact size as Westbrook). I really thought that Mangini, a Wesleyan graduate for cryin' out loud, was going to be smarter than this.

Prediction time: Buffalo's defense is supposed to be the strength of the team, but it stands out nowhere in our key stats and is 25th in interception rate. Offensively, it's the same deal except for YPA, where the Bills are fifth overall. But they don't pass enough -- just 12th in passing yards. The running game? It's not very good: 25th in yards per rush. They're also 19th in third-down percentage. Since third down is predominantly a passing down, that tells us that their YPA is the function of big plays, especially to the great Lee Evans, a Jets killer. Evans is the closest thing I've seen to Wesley Walker and Walker is one of the most underrated receivers in league history. The Jets offense and defense right now stink. Evans explodes in Mangini's face once or twice. Bills 24, Jets 16.

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Jets on move- BRANDON MOORE article

by Dave Hutchinson/The Star-Ledger

Kathy Willens/Associated Press

Leon Washington made sure to tell Brandon Moore 'thank you' as they celebrated Washington's 60-yard TD run on Sunday.Jets running back Leon Washington bolted through the middle of the Kansas City Chiefs defense on his way to a career-long 60-yard touchdown run late in the second quarter, and his thoughts were on the player responsible.

Right guard Brandon Moore had sprung Washington with a dryboard-perfect, backside block on Chiefs middle linebacker Pat Thomas -- just like offensive line coach Bill Callahan drew it up. Washington couldn't wait to offer his thanks.

"As soon as I broke that run, I knew it was because of Brandon," Washington said Thursday. "After the play, I tried to let him know that by giving him the ball. But he didn't quite understand what I was trying to do."

Moore laughed at the memory.

"I thought he was trying to give it to me to spike it. I'm like, 'Man, it's five minutes later, I'm not going to spike it,'" said Moore, exaggerating the time it took him to join the end-zone celebration. "But he was trying to let me know he appreciated what I had done. I appreciate the gesture."

Moore has been getting it done since he stepped into the starting lineup in 2004, having been moved from defensive tackle by former coach Herman Edwards.

The Jets' offensive line has undergone three extreme makeovers during Moore's tenure, the latest being the free-agent signings of left guard Alan Faneca and right tackle Damien Woody. The unit also has had three offensive line coaches in the past three seasons and withstood injuries.

Through it all, Moore has been the only constant and is the team's most tenured offensive lineman. He has started 64 consecutive regular-season games.

"I take pride in that I've been able to adapt to different systems," Moore said. "We've had three or four since I've been here and I've managed to be productive in all of them.

"I haven't really concerned myself with flying under the radar. I guess if you read the papers, you might feel a little lost. But at this stage in my career, you just go out and play. I feel like my play speaks for itself."

This season, Moore (6-3, 295 pounds) is having perhaps his best as a pro. Many of the Jets' big runs have been on the right side behind he and Woody, including Thomas Jones' 31-yarder against the Raiders two weeks ago. He has allowed just one sack, according to Stats Inc.

"Brandon has had a really good season," coach Eric Mangini said. "He's a good example, because of his position change, of a guy who has worked his way up and now has established himself as a good player. He's been as important in that offensive line as anybody else."

Engaging but quiet, Moore leads by example.

"Brandon has been fantastic," center Nick Mangold said. "He has helped me a lot with understanding things. He's not the flashiest player but he gets the job done."

In addition to the block on Washington's touchdown run against the Chiefs, Moore sealed a defender near the five-yard line on Washington's 18-yard touchdown on a screen pass.

"Brandon is about his business," said Washington, who still has the ball from his 60-yard touchdown jaunt. "He comes here every day and does his job and does it well."

But Moore's future with the team is uncertain. He has a $5.65 million balloon payment due him next season in a contract that was reworked two summers ago after he staged a one-practice boycott.

"Like all contracts, I'll be here as long as they want me here," Moore said. "When they don't want me anymore, I'll be gone. I feel comfortable with what I've put out on the field and on the film. Wherever the chips fall is where they fall."

Dave Hutchinson may be reached at dhutchinson@starledger.com.

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Jets' David Bowens adapts to latest big change in career

BY KRISTIE ACKERT

DAILY NEWS WRITER

Friday, October 31st 2008, 7:39 PM

Rogash/Getty

David Bowens

David Bowens was a cool customer long before he ever became an NFL linebacker. It was back in 1982, when he was 4 years old, that Bowens and his older sister faced the cameras in Denver.

He looked straight ahead and simply said he wanted a family. His plea went out over the networks on a program called Wednesday's Child, an attempt to find adoptive parent for children who needed them.

Bowens' appeal struck the heart of a couple in Salt Lake City, and he and his sister were adopted by Walter and Yvonne Bowens and started new lives. A year later, the 5-year-old David Bowens found Walter dead of a heart attack. Four years later, Yvonne remarried and Bowens said he settled into a loving family.

Those early experiences, both happy and sad, made a strong impression on Bowens.

"Changes like that early in life, they kind of teach how to just get yourself out of panic mode," Bowens said Friday. "It teaches to you to relax in different situations. I think it does make you calmer."

That temperament has helped throughout his 10-year NFL career, right up through the challenge of this week. Bowens is preparing to replace the Jets' starting inside linebacker, David Harris, who injured his groin in last week's win over the Chiefs. Harris did not practice Friday and is listed as doubtful for Sunday's game against the Bills in suburban Buffalo.

"In life and it football, there are going to be a lot of changes - it could be year to year, week to week, and it is similar to my situation now with me now at middle linebacker, I've never done that," Bowens said. "So when that happened, I didn't panic, I went out there I knew the calls, I knew what I was supposed to do. With the game-planning and everything going on with whether he (Harris) is in or not, I just told (defensive coordinator (Bob) Sutton to act like everything's normal. I'll adjust."

Bowens started out as a lineman with the Dolphins before becoming a pass-rush specialist. He came to the Jets last season and was a pass-rushing outside linebacker. This year, when the Jets drafted Vernon Gholston in the first round and added Calvin Pace to accompany Bryan Thomas at outside linebacker, Bowens was asked to switch to inside. He has had seven tackles and three sacks playing behind Harris in nickel and dime packages.

WOODY RETURNS: OT Damien Woody returned to practice Friday. He had missed two practices because of a family matter. ... Besides Harris, S Eric Smith (head) and TE Bubba Franks (hip) also did not practice Friday. Smith is out for Sunday and Franks is doubtful. TE Chris Baker (hip) and LB Cody Spencer (shoulder) practiced but are questionable for Sunday while WRs Laveranues Coles and Jerricho Cotchery (shoulder) fully participated in practice and are considered probable.

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Jets' offense suffering identity crisis

Even Mangini not sure of Gang Green's strength

By Brendan Kuty / SNY.tv

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. -- Ground or air? Smash-mouth or high-flying?

After eight weeks of up-and-down football, some would say the Jets (4-3) are fortunate to be over .500. But almost all would agree that they've yet to establish a concrete "identity" on offense, a point augmented by Sunday's too-close-for-comfort win over flimsy Kansas City, 28-24.

The typically vague Eric Mangini wasn't much help when asked where his onus lies.

"It can be heavy emphasis on the run; heavy emphasis on the pass; it could be no-huddle; it could be empty; it could be it's just not one package," the head coach said during Monday's conference call.

Earlier in the conversation, he basically called the Jets offense a chameleon, deeming it "game-plan specific."

If that's the true, shouldn't have Sunday's recipe involved a little less Brett Favre, who ended up tossing three ugly interceptions -- including one in the red zone -- before engineering his 41st fourth-quarter comeback, and a pinch more Thomas Jones and Leon Washington? The Chiefs entered the game with the league's worst rushing defense, and Jones had ran for 159 yards against the Raiders the week prior, his best total with the Jets.

Mangini noted he hoped to take advantage of the Chiefs' extremely inexperienced secondary by letting Favre loose before addressing the running game.

"Oakland wasn't particularly strong against the run, and we ran it for 250 yards and scored 13 points, so you can look at it either way," he said.

At the beginning of training camp, the Jets looked ready to commit to grinding it out on the ground, signing left guard Alan Faneca and right tackle Damien Woody to big-time deals in the offseason. Chad Pennington and Kellen Clemens were battling for the starting quarterback's spot, a position that seemed more "facilitator" than "play-maker".

Then along came Favre, and the rest was history.

After four solid games to open the season, including one Herculean, six-TD effort, Favre hasn't been sharp. The Green Bay legend has thrown 10 picks in his last five games. Sunday's late interception, which Brandon Flowers returned 91 yards to the end zone, looked to be the back-breaker, one that would have dropped the Jets to 3-4 entering the toughest part of their schedule.

Mangini placed the blame squarely on second-year receiver Chansi Stuckey, for whom the pass was intended.

"Yeah, he should have kept going on that," Mangini said of Stuckey, who stopped mid-route. "Worse-case scenario, if the guy does catch it, you have to be able to make the tackle. It's a turnover, but it's not a turnover which results in a touchdown, and he could do a lot better job on that play of finishing that route."

But Stuckey, without malice, unintentionally accused the play calling of offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer and Manigini of being predictable.

"[Flowers] kind of recognized it from the first time," Stuckey said. "We had kind of beat them up pretty good on that play in the first quarter on a third down. He recognized it and jumped inside. I tried to get inside him but he kind of game me a little bump that got me off my route and I kind of bumped into the safety and he was just kind of kept running and the ball came right to him and he just made a play."

Brendan Kuty is a regular contributor to SNY.tv.

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NY Jets Owner Woody Johnson Talks Favre, PSL's

Posted Byarren Rovell

This morning on "The Call," Melissa Francis and I interviewed New York Jets owner Woody Johnson. Here are the highlights from our conversation.

Darren: You planned to auction a little bit more than 2,000 of those (Coaches Club) seats and you auctioned off less than half of them. What do you owe that to? Is that the economic times or the fact that you might have tried to auction off to many in a smaller time period?

Johnson: Well, I think part of it was. First of all, 2,000 was the absolute limit of the Coaches Club. This is a first time event really with StubHub and auctioning off this kind of product. So 620 (PSL's) over a nine-day period, we consider a major success. It was. We set and validated the fact that in the public market, the PSL has value, has a lot of value and people are happy with it.

Darren: About half of the NFL teams have done these personal seat licenses. Fans have a chance to purchase the seats or will purchase the seats once they buy these PSL's. In every market, the fans get very upset that they are being asked to do this. That their loyalty is being uprooted by financial demands. What do you say to that long time season ticket holder who can't afford the Coaches Club or even something like the $5,000 PSL and now has to move the upper deck?

Johnson: One of the things we've tried to do is tried to end the pricing of the building. We've tried to have a price and location and come up with a product for virtually everybody. We've left, as you may aware, a third of the building

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Jets' offense suffering identity crisis

Even Mangini not sure of Gang Green's strength

By Brendan Kuty / SNY.tv

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. -- Ground or air? Smash-mouth or high-flying?

After eight weeks of up-and-down football, some would say the Jets (4-3) are fortunate to be over .500. But almost all would agree that they've yet to establish a concrete "identity" on offense, a point augmented by Sunday's too-close-for-comfort win over flimsy Kansas City, 28-24.

The typically vague Eric Mangini wasn't much help when asked where his onus lies.

"It can be heavy emphasis on the run; heavy emphasis on the pass; it could be no-huddle; it could be empty; it could be it's just not one package," the head coach said during Monday's conference call.

Earlier in the conversation, he basically called the Jets offense a chameleon, deeming it "game-plan specific."

If that's the true, shouldn't have Sunday's recipe involved a little less Brett Favre, who ended up tossing three ugly interceptions -- including one in the red zone -- before engineering his 41st fourth-quarter comeback, and a pinch more Thomas Jones and Leon Washington? The Chiefs entered the game with the league's worst rushing defense, and Jones had ran for 159 yards against the Raiders the week prior, his best total with the Jets.

Mangini noted he hoped to take advantage of the Chiefs' extremely inexperienced secondary by letting Favre loose before addressing the running game.

"Oakland wasn't particularly strong against the run, and we ran it for 250 yards and scored 13 points, so you can look at it either way," he said.

At the beginning of training camp, the Jets looked ready to commit to grinding it out on the ground, signing left guard Alan Faneca and right tackle Damien Woody to big-time deals in the offseason. Chad Pennington and Kellen Clemens were battling for the starting quarterback's spot, a position that seemed more "facilitator" than "play-maker".

Then along came Favre, and the rest was history.

After four solid games to open the season, including one Herculean, six-TD effort, Favre hasn't been sharp. The Green Bay legend has thrown 10 picks in his last five games. Sunday's late interception, which Brandon Flowers returned 91 yards to the end zone, looked to be the back-breaker, one that would have dropped the Jets to 3-4 entering the toughest part of their schedule.

Mangini placed the blame squarely on second-year receiver Chansi Stuckey, for whom the pass was intended.

"Yeah, he should have kept going on that," Mangini said of Stuckey, who stopped mid-route. "Worse-case scenario, if the guy does catch it, you have to be able to make the tackle. It's a turnover, but it's not a turnover which results in a touchdown, and he could do a lot better job on that play of finishing that route."

But Stuckey, without malice, unintentionally accused the play calling of offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer and Manigini of being predictable.

"[Flowers] kind of recognized it from the first time," Stuckey said. "We had kind of beat them up pretty good on that play in the first quarter on a third down. He recognized it and jumped inside. I tried to get inside him but he kind of game me a little bump that got me off my route and I kind of bumped into the safety and he was just kind of kept running and the ball came right to him and he just made a play."

Brendan Kuty is a regular contributor to SNY.tv.

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