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Paging Joaquin Phoenix - A Mr. River Phoenix Is Waiting On The White Courtesy Phone


The Gun Of Bavaria

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This is a Andy Kaufman type act.

Don't disparage Kaufman. I was running better scams than Phoenix when I was in college. Totally bogus and a rank amateur's attempt at "mind f**k" comedy. Although listening to the sycophants in the audience belly laughing at every one of Letterman's "softball" jibes, it must play well in the Heartland. That's Epic Fail material in my book.

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Kaufman sucked. Hugely overrated. His schtick wore thin in less than a minute.

Letterman did what he could to handle a douchebag who's running a dumb gag.

THANK YOU! Someone else who said the same thing I've thought for years. Not sure when Kaufman became the 2Pac of comedy. He's ridiculously overrated.

:cheers:

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Kaufman sucked. Hugely overrated. His schtick wore thin in less than a minute.

Letterman did what he could to handle a douchebag who's running a dumb gag.

I disagree on your appraisal of Kaufman. Just for creating the alter ego persona, Tony Clifton, guarantees his place in comedy's pantheon. Sure, seen with today's eyes--not with those of the 1970s--the routines may not appear that groundbreaking, but they were. He was the quantum leap that made guys like Letterman possible. Of course, you can only go to the well so many times. By the end, Kaufman became another hollow, Hollywood hack. But, in his day, no one could make you scratch your head wondering if what you were watching was real or not.

As for Letterman: Most young guys on the Board probably don't realize that his first foray into talk shows happened in the afternoons, on NBC, in the 80s. That was Letterman at his finest: sharp, edgy, and full of sarcastic dark humor. The person you see now is a corporate shill, just like Leno and the rest, phoning in a TV program. It has become comfortable and pathetically predictable. There was nothing sadder for me than to watch him around the Holidays hawking his latest book--Late Show Fun Facts (oh, my fu**ing God) and reading those awful passages.

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THANK YOU! Someone else who said the same thing I've thought for years. Not sure when Kaufman became the 2Pac of comedy. He's ridiculously overrated.

:cheers:

Spoken like someone who never got--and never will get--the joke. Go listen to Dave do another Top 10 list and laugh out loud along with the rest of the sycophants. I wish we still had neg rep.

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THANK YOU! Someone else who said the same thing I've thought for years. Not sure when Kaufman became the 2Pac of comedy. He's ridiculously overrated.

:cheers:

I agree, I wouldn't say he was the greatest comedian of his time, but maybe the greatest TROLL of all-time.

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I disagree on your appraisal of Kaufman. Just for creating the alter ego persona, Tony Clifton, guarantees his place in comedy's pantheon. Sure, seen with today's eyes--not with those of the 1970s--the routines may not appear that groundbreaking, but they were. He was the quantum leap that made guys like Letterman possible. Of course, you can only go to the well so many times. By the end, Kaufman became another hollow, Hollywood hack. But, in his day, no one could make you scratch your head wondering if what you were watching was real or not.

As for Letterman: Most young guys on the Board probably don't realize that his first foray into talk shows happened in the afternoons, on NBC, in the 80s. That was Letterman at his finest: sharp, edgy, and full of sarcastic dark humor. The person you see now is a corporate shill, just like Leno and the rest, phoning in a TV program. It has become comfortable and pathetically predictable. There was nothing sadder for me than to watch him around the Holidays hawking his latest book--Late Show Fun Facts (oh, my fu**ing God) and reading those awful passages.

I'm 46 years old, Borgo. I saw Kaufman in the 70s and he was tedious. I'd compare him to Will Ferrell today - not doing anything funny, but getting laughs because somebody said he was a comedian.

I saw Letterman's show live in 1982, before a lot of NBC affiliate stations even stayed on the air that late. I'll agree that he's not as edgy as he once was, but to lump him into Leno-like lameness is off-base. I hated that "fun facts" deal too, though.

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I'm 46 years old, Borgo. I saw Kaufman in the 70s and he was tedious. I'd compare him to Will Ferrell today - not doing anything funny, but getting laughs because somebody said he was a comedian.

I saw Letterman's show live in 1982, before a lot of NBC affiliate stations even stayed on the air that late. I'll agree that he's not as edgy as he once was, but to lump him into Leno-like lameness is off-base. I hated that "fun facts" deal too, though.

You know I respect you, Bob. We'll just disagree on this one. Clearly--and, most probably, intentionally--he was not everyone's cup of tea, just like I have friends who don't get Python. How good was Letterman's short-lived afternoon show? I'm 52, BTW. My bones are beginning to fossilize.

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There's no excuse for not enjoying Python. Other than stupidity, of course.

How in the world do you NOT enjoy Python.

As for Kaufman - His antics back in the day made me laugh but his act did get old fast. My favorte was when he played and old recording of the Mightry Mouse song and moutheed the words. Don't know why but I laughed my ass off. Could have been the weed though.

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How in the world do you NOT enjoy Python.

As for Kaufman - His antics back in the day made me laugh but his act did get old fast. My favorte was when he played and old recording of the Mightry Mouse song and moutheed the words. Don't know why but I laughed my ass off. Could have been the weed though.

Go find anything you can involving his character Tony Clifton, a foul mouthed lounge singer that would intentionally insult and bait the audience. They had no idea it was Kaufman, who even upon his deathbed never admitted it was him or his friend/manager, Bob Zmuda, in disguise. That's what makes him so brilliant in my eyes: It did not matter if the act was funny, or anyone got the joke, as long as the scam/mind f**k was successful.

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