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brandon pettigrew @ 17


bitonti
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so here we are March 24, i don't think there is a bigger hole on the roster than blocking TE. just sayin.

And I dont think we need to spend a 1st round pick on a blocking TE. Not to mention, this draft is loaded with TE talent.

It would be very foolish IMO to take a TE in the first 2 straight years, especially when at the spot were are in we could potentially take a solid 3-4 DE, 2nd tier WR, or top notch RB or CB.

I would be very very upset with a TE and I highly doubt it happens.

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So if Kyle Brady were available again, you'd take him?

QB, pass rushers and a WR are all much much bigger needs than a blocking tight end.

It's not likely that they'll take any pass rushers. They already have Thomas, Pace, Scott & Gholston on the books. I doubt they can afford another OLB pass rusher. They can use a DE, but aren't likely to get anybody there that will generate pass rush. 3-4 DEs generally don't.

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So if Kyle Brady were available again, you'd take him?

QB, pass rushers and a WR are all much much bigger needs than a blocking tight end.

kyle brady circa 10 years ago, yes. Kyle brady now... not so much.

Think about it - they have pass rushers, they have QB, they have WR - enough at least to start the season.

Right now, today, the Jets don't have enough TE on the roster to start the season. And unlike say the Colts they don't have 3 WR worth starting either. So it's not like flexing out to a run-and-gun look is an option either.

also let me be clear

im not saying Pettigrew at 17 is their TOP target... but if all of their ideal targets are gone (moreno, sanchez) i think this is a serious possibility. How is Rex Ryan gonna run a run-first ball control offense without a player like Pettigrew?

Edited by bitonti
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But just because there is a hole in the roster doesn't mean you HAVE to address it in the 1st round. You should ALWAYS go BPA in the 1st imo. That is where you have the best chance to get the best players regardless of position.

Also TE is not that hard to fill later. Phillips and Gronkowski are good all around players. I don't know much about Pascoe or some of the offenses like Iowa or Arkansas who have generally been run heavy. There are some guys from those schools that are eligible according to ESPN. You don't need to run a 4.5 to be a TE when we already have that guy on the roster. Pettigrew is a solid player and if he's the BPA fine, go with him and try and run a deadly 2 TE offense. but don't target him solely because we need a dual purpose TE.

two responses, Petti might actually be the BPA at 17, regardless of need, and saying TE isn't hard to fill isn't accurate - as these players are usually 1 or more year of development away from actually playing real offense. Petti is the only obvious TE in this draft who can block and play right away. There might be others but they are tough to find and rarely play right away.

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two responses, Petti might actually be the BPA at 17, regardless of need, and saying TE isn't hard to fill isn't accurate - as these players are usually 1 or more year of development away from actually playing real offense. Petti is the only obvious TE in this draft who can block and play right away. There might be others but they are tough to find and rarely play right away.

Bit, obviously I have a problem with TE in the first again with all the TE talent out there. So let me ask you because I respect your opinion....

How much better is Pettigrew (who would require a first) than say guys like....

Chase Coffman

Shawn Nelson

Travis Beckum

Dan Gronkowski

I mean, if we are looking for a blocking TE, these guys are that and can be available in the 3rd possibly 4th.

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Bit, obviously I have a problem with TE in the first again with all the TE talent out there. So let me ask you because I respect your opinion....

How much better is Pettigrew (who would require a first) than say guys like....

Chase Coffman

Shawn Nelson

Travis Beckum

Dan Gronkowski

I mean, if we are looking for a blocking TE, these guys are that and can be available in the 3rd possibly 4th.

the first 3 names are H backs. They are 250 and below and receivers primarily. Petti is around 270, i don't think it's comparable to put an H back next to a Y back and rank them but people will do it and Petti will still be #1 TE. Nelson is most complete name there but not exactly a grinding blocker - but he could be the 2nd TE off the board and a likely high 2nd round pick. There are other excellent Hbacks in this draft such as Jared Cook South Carolina, James Casey Rice, Cornelius Ingram Florida.

Gronk, falls into a category I would call Mid-to-late round sleeper... other names include John Phillips Virginia, Travis McCall Alabama, John Nablone Monmouth, ryan Purvis Boston college , Bear pascoe Fresno State, Kevin Brock Rutgers etc. Some of these guys can block better than others but I'm not sure that ANY of them are ready for prime time in 2009.

Put it another way, finding an in-line TE who can block and start right away is like finding an OT or DT who can start right away. It's a trench position, a certain amount of physicality is required from day 1. those who don't have that physicality don't get picked in the high part of the draft.

Again I can't emphasize this enough, even though I came to this conclusion in a mock draft, this is not MY personal preference. I believe this has to be a real possibility for the Jets however, especially if players like Mark Sanchez and Knowshon Moreno are off the board.

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He's another Daniel Graham. I wouldnt touch him in the first round.

Kyle Brady 10 years ago that early was a boneheaded pick. They're not first round players.

And you can never have enough pass rushers and right now...the Jets dont really have any good ones.

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the first 3 names are H backs. They are 250 and below and receivers primarily. Petti is around 270, i don't think it's comparable to put an H back next to a Y back and rank them but people will do it and Petti will still be #1 TE. Nelson is most complete name there but not exactly a grinding blocker - but he could be the 2nd TE off the board and a likely high 2nd round pick. There are other excellent Hbacks in this draft such as Jared Cook South Carolina, James Casey Rice, Cornelius Ingram Florida.

Gronk, falls into a category I would call Mid-to-late round sleeper... other names include John Phillips Virginia, Travis McCall Alabama, John Nablone Monmouth, ryan Purvis Boston college , Bear pascoe Fresno State, Kevin Brock Rutgers etc. Some of these guys can block better than others but I'm not sure that ANY of them are ready for prime time in 2009.

Put it another way, finding an in-line TE who can block and start right away is like finding an OT or DT who can start right away. It's a trench position, a certain amount of physicality is required from day 1. those who don't have that physicality don't get picked in the high part of the draft.

Again I can't emphasize this enough, even though I came to this conclusion in a mock draft, this is not MY personal preference. I believe this has to be a real possibility for the Jets however, especially if players like Mark Sanchez and Knowshon Moreno are off the board.

Gotcha. Thanks for the breakdown. Its definitely not my preference. I think we can get that type of a player later, obviously not that caliber, but maybe some of the names you provided in the later.

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And you can never have enough pass rushers and right now...the Jets dont really have any good ones.

I agree you can't have enough pass rushers... but if Orakpo and Brown are gone, who would you pick at 17? Connor Barwin is the only one that I can consider that makes sense.

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Pettigrew wouldn't hurt or kill us as a pick. It's actually a pretty damn smart pick, and a fairly safe one to make.

Obviously if theres better on the board you take them, but I'd much rather have the best TE in the draft rather than the 3rd best WR.

I have no idea how it doesn't make sense to people beyond the "ZOMG TE!!!" crap. Boo hoo we drafted TE's a long time ago that didn't live up to whatever vague expectations people had for them back then.

And Keller is not a true TE. He's a TE in the sense that Dallas Clark and Antonio Gates are TE's. Pettigrew is a true TE, and would add dimensions to our offense that the 3rd best WR in the draft probably won't be able to right away.

Edited by SenorGato
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He's another Daniel Graham. I wouldnt touch him in the first round.

Kyle Brady 10 years ago that early was a boneheaded pick. They're not first round players.

And you can never have enough pass rushers and right now...the Jets dont really have any good ones.

daniel graham was a #21 overall pick who just got huge money from Denver for his blocking ability

kyle brady played 13 years in the league

Unless there is another "sapp" on the board I don't see the harm in taking the next kyle brady.

***

it should be noted that I was involved in another mock draft with the Jets - and I purposefully passed on Petti to see how that plays out

the draft went RB wells rd1, WR wallace rd2, CB barnes rd3 and TE Quinn rd4. I don't think Richard Quinn is ready to start the year, that scares me.

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it should be noted that I was involved in another mock draft with the Jets - and I purposefully passed on Petti to see how that plays out

the draft went RB wells rd1, WR wallace rd2, CB barnes rd3 and TE Quinn rd4. I don't think Richard Quinn is ready to start the year, that scares me.

I'd take Pettigrew over Wells assuming Moreno is off the board. I like Wallace and Barnes too.

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I have to say, I just don't get this line of thinking regarding Pettigrew. Considering that we have three quarterbacks that started a combined eight unspectacular games (regardless of what we think their potential is, they are unproven), a lack of playmaking wideouts (Cotchery is a sold #2, Stuckey may be a solid #2, Clowney has potential-there's that 'P' word again), a dline that lacks any true backup to Kris Jenkins (and has a bunch of JAGs at DE), and our starting RB is 31 years old (and isn't particularly powerful or fast), this is a pick you just cannot make.

Yes as of today, we don't have a solid blocking tight end on the roster. But if you grab Pettigrew, you will be doing one of the following on non goal line plays:

1) Run a standard offense with Pettigrew starting and benching our second most explosive weapon on offense (Keller ranks slightly behind Leon Washington).

2) Run a standard offense with Keller starting and benching our first round pick (hard to justify keeping your first round pick on the bench unless that pick is a franchise potential quarterback or you just won the super bowl).

3) Run a two tight end offense and bench our in line blocker (Richardson) which would pretty much destroy the whole point that the Pettigrew backers are making in the first place (i.e. we need him to have a potent run offense).

Yes it would be nice if Keller were a better blocker (and hopefully this is something he will work on in the offseason to at least be adequate). But I think considering that we have a solid tight end on the roster anyway (even if he's not the all around threat we would all ideally like) and that we have other holes to fill, I think this is a luxury we can't afford. We can grab blocking tight ends through FA and the draft that can do solidly IMHO (they don't have to start to be good pickups).

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just to be clear im not advocating this move, i'm predicting it

he's a legit first rounder, which is more than we can say about some of the WR names being bandied around.

and yes you can find other TE in the draft but it's unlikely you could start them on day 1.

I've got a gut feeling we've been saving some money to pursue the services of bubba franks some time after the draft

I think Ryan is setting it up to take Sanchez at 17 or possibly try and trade up to go get him if he and tannenbaum see fit.

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I don't care if some view "Blocking TE" as our biggest weakness, there is absolutely ZERO reason to select a Tight End at 17 with the hole at Wide Receiver and Thomas Jones at 30 years old and wanting a new contract.

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I don't care if some view "Blocking TE" as our biggest weakness, there is absolutely ZERO reason to select a Tight End at 17 with the hole at Wide Receiver and Thomas Jones at 30 years old and wanting a new contract.

they have bodies at WR

they have bodies at RB

in theory they could start the season with David Clowney and Jeruu Caulcrick playing.

but they have 1 TE, Keller, that's not enough to start the year, let alone play a whole year.

Until that situation remedies itself there is literally NO bigger hole on the roster than TE. Keller isn't even a TE, hes an H back. Another way of looking at it they have 0 true TE.

We can sit here and say it's so easy to find these guys, and that's fine. But until the Jets do actually find one of those guys, saying there is absolutely ZERO reason to take a TE is living in denial.

3rd and goal from the 2, who are the 2 or 3 TE the Jets are using? the answer to that question is crucial to the success of the team.

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they have bodies at WR

they have bodies at RB

in theory they could start the season with David Clowney and Jeruu Caulcrick playing.

but they have 1 TE, Keller, that's not enough to start the year, let alone play a whole year.

Until that situation remedies itself there is literally NO bigger hole on the roster than TE. Keller isn't even a TE, hes an H back. Another way of looking at it they have 0 true TE.

We can sit here and say it's so easy to find these guys, and that's fine. But until the Jets do actually find one of those guys, saying there is absolutely ZERO reason to take a TE is living in denial.

3rd and goal from the 2, who are the 2 or 3 TE the Jets are using? the answer to that question is crucial to the success of the team.

The Jets can pick up bodies in Free Agency or in Rounds 3-7 for their Blocking Tight End needs, they don't need to use a 1st round pick on a guy who isn't known as the best blocking Tight End in the freakin' draft. Taking a blocking Tight End with a 1st round pick is STUPID and this franchise has done that one before and look how that one turned out.

Take a Receiver, take a Running Back, take a Quarterback, heck even take a Defensive End if you want, but do NOT take a freakin' Tight End with the 17th overall pick when you have Keller and Rex Ryan has said he will be blocking on the line. You can find a blocking Tight End in the mid rounds of the draft.

There is no reason to draft Daniel Graham Part 2 at 17.

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You can find a blocking Tight End in the mid rounds of the draft.

You can find a receiver or a running back or whatever in the middle rounds, too. Do you actually have anything to support the idea that there's a bigger dropoff between the first and fourth rounds at those positions than there is at tight end?

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You can find a receiver or a running back or whatever in the middle rounds, too. Do you actually have anything to support the idea that there's a bigger dropoff between the first and fourth rounds at those positions than there is at tight end?

Would you rather a #2 Tight End whose primary job will be to block or would you rather a #2 Wide Receiver?

The answer should be simple.

Wide Receiver.

And thats just using WR, let alone a replacement for Kenyon Coleman or insurance policy to the 31 year old Jones and Scatback Leon.

Do you have anything to support that TE is such a huge dropoff? They're both question marks as to how the depth at those positions in the draft go. I'd rather have a starting WR than a second sting, blocking primarily Tight End.

Edited by 124
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Would you rather a #2 Tight End whose primary job will be to block or would you rather a #2 Wide Receiver?

The answer should be simple.

Wide Receiver.

And thats just using WR, let alone a replacement for Kenyon Coleman or insurance policy to the 31 year old Jones and Scatback Leon.

Do you have anything to support that TE is such a huge dropoff? They're both question marks as to how the depth at those positions in the draft go. I'd rather have a starting WR than a second sting, blocking primarily Tight End.

I agree that WR is a bigger hole, but you'd prefer a #3 RB? You don't draft insurance in the first round. You draft players.

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Would you rather a #2 Tight End whose primary job will be to block or would you rather a #2 Wide Receiver?

Which one is a better player? You're putting undue emphasis on the fact that the #2 receiver is nominally a starter and the #2 tight end isn't. Pettigrew would play more for us this season than a rookie receiver would notwithstanding the fact that wideout is a 'bigger need.'

Do you have anything to support that TE is such a huge dropoff?

No, but I'm not the one trying to argue that the logic of 'you can get one later' somehow applies more to tight ends who can block than it does to other players.

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Pfffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffft. We don't have a big-time back-up punter, either. It doesn't mean you burn a 1 to nab one.

Pettigrew is a nice player, but every draft has a couple of those guys. It's a silly notion that grab one just because he's "there," particularly at a position that's de-facto filled already and can be summarily fortified by a relatively inexpensive free agent.

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Which one is a better player? You're putting undue emphasis on the fact that the #2 receiver is nominally a starter and the #2 tight end isn't. Pettigrew would play more for us this season than a rookie receiver would notwithstanding the fact that wideout is a 'bigger need.'

No, but I'm not the one trying to argue that the logic of 'you can get one later' somehow applies more to tight ends who can block than it does to other players.

Nobody's going to think like that because WR is a NEED and people would rather pigeonhole us.

Who cares if we're drafting the #3 WR in the draft compared to the #1 TE...who cares that WR's rarely blow up as rookies...the fact is that Pettigrew is just a "blocking TE," and unlike RB's and WR's you can get those out of the first.

Not to mention that Keller fits the description of a pro TE to the tee...from his 6'2 height to his 245-250 pound frame all the way down to his blocking skills.

Edited by SenorGato
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It's a silly notion that grab one just because he's "there," particularly at a position that's de-facto filled already and can be summarily fortified by a relatively inexpensive free agent.

The best tight end on the market is Bubba Franks. The best receiver on the market is Torry Holt. In Soviet Russia, dead horse beat you.

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The best tight end on the market is Bubba Franks. The best receiver on the market is Torry Holt. In Soviet Russia, dead horse beat you.

Como se what? I think you are working too hard to try and justify drafting a blocking tight end in the first round. AT BEST, the pick is a luxury, at worst it's redundant. The logic is just silly. Drafting a corner to play in the Dime makes more sense if, using your logic, we are drafting niche players to fill a role with the first pick in the draft to stock a roster with many, many holes, no?

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Take a Receiver, take a Running Back, take a Quarterback, heck even take a Defensive End if you want, but do NOT take a freakin' Tight End

yeah take 4 positions that won't play and avoid a position that actually will

hey maybe they should take the best available offensive lineman at 17!

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Como se what? I think you are working too hard to try and justify drafting a blocking tight end in the first round. AT BEST, the pick is a luxury, at worst it's redundant. The logic is just silly. Drafting a corner to play in the Dime makes more sense if, using your logic, we are drafting niche players to fill a role with the first pick in the draft to stock a roster with many, many holes, no?

TomShane maybe you stopped being a Jets fan in the time you were gone. ;)

I would invite you to look at the roster, then point out a bigger hole than TE. Go ahead it's Newyorkjets.com.

Tight end is literally the biggest hole on the roster. There are no bodies there. They have an H back (who is 6'2" by the way) and a long snapper.

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TomShane maybe you stopped being a Jets fan in the time you were gone. ;)

I would invite you to look at the roster, then point out a bigger hole than TE. Go ahead it's Newyorkjets.com.

Tight end is literally the biggest hole on the roster. There are no bodies there. They have an H back (who is 6'2" by the way) and a long snapper.

I hear you, brother, and you KNOW I have a hard-on for tight ends (and, tight ends), but you have to admit that all holes are not created equally (snicker). You can fill the "blocking TE" role with a later pick, no? We are talking about position investment here. Look at the Colts and the Giants (when they had Shockey)--they went and FOUND guys to pinch the D-end, they didn't burn a high pick to fill a niche role.

Ask yourself this question:: Would Bill Polian do it?

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yeah take 4 positions that won't play and avoid a position that actually will

hey maybe they should take the best available offensive lineman at 17!

when should I get back into the stock market ?

jay cutler is just the latest example that you can never bank on a player being with you for the length of the contract

your way of thinking leads to draft picks like jeff lageman, mike nugent and roger vick

why not a lineman ? what would happen to the season if the jets had to actually play wayne hunter for 7 games ?

the draft is about acquiring talent

FA is for filling roster spots

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I hear you, brother, and you KNOW I have a hard-on for tight ends (and, tight ends), but you have to admit that all holes are not created equally (snicker). You can fill the "blocking TE" role with a later pick, no? We are talking about position investment here. Look at the Colts and the Giants (when they had Shockey)--they went and FOUND guys to pinch the D-end, they didn't burn a high pick to fill a niche role.

Ask yourself this question:: Would Bill Polian do it?

Why are we supposed to draft like we have Peyton Manning when we don't have Peyton Manning?

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Why are we supposed to draft like we have Peyton Manning when we don't have Peyton Manning?

I assume you're making the point that because the Colts are, at first glance, a passing team that our draft philosophy, as a running team, should be different?

Flawed, homey.

You're saying that we should make a concession to our lack of a big-time QB and just draft with the intent of running the ball 40 times a game. It's short-sighted, imo, but typical of Jets drafting.

Drafting another TE to primarily block with the first rounder does not upgrade the roster in the measure that a first rounder should. Unless Pettigrew turns out to be Jason Witten, you're not getting proper return on investment.

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USA Today 10/18/2006

NFL Report: Two tight ends, shotgun help teams stop the blitzUpdated 10/18/2006 4:13 PM ET

By Jim Corbett, USA TODAY

More teams are bringing the blitz this season, and ESPN analyst Ron Jaworski says two trends have emerged in response to that increased pressure.

Teams are using more two-tight-end sets and employing the shotgun formation more often to better protect quarterbacks who have been under siege.

"There was more use of two tight ends last year, and there's been a carryover effect to this year," Jaworski says. "A lot of it is dictated by the number of blitzes teams are seeing. Because of the no-contact rule's enforcement after 5 yards a couple of years ago, teams said, 'Well, we'll blitz more to get the advantage back to the defense.'

"It's punch, counterpunch. Now you see more teams max protecting with two tight ends because the best way to counter the blitz is to have, in effect, two tackles on each side to make pass rushers have to widen their rush to the quarterback."

Steelers offensive coordinator Ken Whisenhunt notes that a double-tight-end set can confuse defenses.

"When you have two tight ends, it makes you more balanced than having a strong-side set; it makes it more guesswork for the defense," Whisenhunt says. "Plus, the reason some teams are lining up a tight end in the backfield is that it's harder and harder to find a good fullback these days, and the tight end is a better receiver out of the backfield most times than a fullback would be."

Jack Anderson, Washington Post, June 26, 2008

When the Redskins drafted tight end Fred Davis with a second-round pick, many fans' initial reaction was that the pick was wasted. After all, Chris Cooley held down the ship more than adequately last season. He has been a huge favorite in DC, and moving him did not appear to be option.

Jim Zorn reassured fans that Cooley would still be a factor, and that Davis was brought in to help form a quality, two-tight-end set.

Cooley was the top target of QB Jason Campbell last season, hauling in 66 passes for 786 yards and eight TDs. Campbell established a strong rapport with Cooley, and he was more consistent in his throws when passing to the tight end.

Davis was the nation's finest, collegiate tight end last year, winning the John Mackey award for the top tight end in the country. His addition, upon further examination, is a good one.

Campbell's accuracy and confidence increased when throwing to tight ends last season. He wasn't the same when throwing to WRs. Maybe it was the drops that plagued them early on, or maybe it was the size difference (Santana Moss and Antwaan Randle El are both significantly shorter than Cooley), but whatever the case, Campbell missed throws to WRs that he didn't miss to TEs.

So Zorn decided to play to Campbell's strength and stole another TE for him. Davis was the best player available at that point, so Zorn decided to take a chance.

Campbell should benefit from Davis' arrival, considering that Davis is a fantastic route runner and possesses great hands. A premium is put on route running in Zorn's West Coast system, so Davis fits very well.

Davis provides some extra security for Campbell as he transitions from the timing system Joe Gibbs used to Zorn's West Coast offense.

With both tight ends on the field, defenses will be hard pressed to conjure up a scheme with the personnel to defend both. Most LBs will be too slow, while safeties will be too small. Add a solid WR corps, including Devin Thomas, Malcolm Kelly, Moss, and Randle El, and most defenses will not have the manpower to stop the 'Skins' offense.

The two-tight-end set creates a matchup nightmare for opposing coaches, and Zorn was wise to stick with his convictions that more offense is needed to help Campbell. Now that he has accomplished this, it's time to put the pieces into action.

From Sports Illustrated 2006

Bill Parcells' booming voice filled with excitement last week when I asked why he switched this season to two tight ends in his base offense. His first answer lasted more than three minutes -- long even for the moody yet loquacious coach -- and I got the sense it wasn't just because he was pleased to be talking about something other than Terrell Owens' hamstring or Drew Bledsoe's job as starting quarterback.

In case you didn't notice, Dallas' versatile tight ends Jason Witten and Anthony Fasano combined for seven catches and 84 yards in last week's 27-10 victory over the Redskins. The Cowboys could be without T.O. for several weeks because of his broken right finger, but the offense should be OK with those tight ends on the field at the same time with wideout Terry Glenn and tailback Julius Jones or Marion Barber.

Why is the future Hall of Fame coach so enthusiastic about the formation? It's mainly because he believes that multidimensional tight ends give an offense more favorable matchups against a base defense. For example, when Dallas lines up with two tight ends, a defense generally responds with its base package -- a 4-3 or 3-4 -- because of a potential run. Conversely, against a three-wideout set, a defense typically replaces a linebacker with its nickelback.

"The nickel player nowadays is a 500- or 600-play player," says Parcells. "He's playing about half the time, so he's considered a specialist. He's working on being a nickelback. My contention is the matchup that you get with an additional tight end against a normal safety or normal linebacker is really more advantageous than what you get by deploying your third wide receiver in the game and having defenses put their specialty player in."

About a third of the NFL teams now use two-tight-end sets. The formation was used heavily in the mid- to late-90s, and the trend has returned recently in a mutant form. And with Antonio Gates as the model, many of today's tight ends are as adept at receiving and running after the catch as they are at blocking, which brings unique challenges to defenses. "It's coming back around," says Seattle director of pro personnel Will Lewis of the formation, "but it's not easy to get the right personnel."

Dallas' shift began last year, when Parcells kept only one fullback on the roster, the 6-foot, 248-pound Lousaka Polite as the offense used two tight ends less than 50 percent of the time. But in the offseason Polite was forced to convert to tight end to make the team. He occasionally reverts to fullback in some short-yardage situations, but now the Cowboys use two-tight-end sets more than 80 percent of the time. "The fullbacks are kind of like the dinosaur," said Parcells, who has drafted three tight ends in the past four seasons. "They are a little bit extinct."

The two-tight-end set was barely in existence when Parcells first saw it. Parcells was New England's linebackers coach in 1980 -- his second season in the NFL -- when he first saw the Detroit Lions use the formation as part of their base offense. Parcells, like his former assistants Bill Belichick, Al Groh and Charlie Weis, call the two-tight end set " Detroit" or the " Detroit Package." "The formation was a very uncommon thing to see. It was rare," Parcells told me. " Detroit can also mean DT-double-TE."

Despite Witten being among the NFL's elite tight ends, the Cowboys switched to the Detroit Package by surprisingly plucking Fasano from Notre Dame in the second round of the 2006 draft. According to league insiders, the decision stunned the Bengals, who had targeted Fasano two spots later. But Dallas envisioned the 6-foot-4, 258-pound Fasano as an ideal fit after he had played in the Irish's two-tight-end formation under first-year coach Charlie Weis, Parcells' former assistant with the Patriots and Jets. Weis' two-tight-end set uses terminology and philosophy similar to Dallas'.

"A lot of people, if they didn't know what our offense was trying to do, would wonder why the Cowboys would pick me," Fasano said. "But I think I'm a good fit."

To hear Parcells speak with such enthusiasm, he apparently does too.

These were on the other Jets board.

But yea...who needs 2 talented TE's...especially ones just a "blocking TE" whatever the ***** that is.

Edited by SenorGato
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USA Today 10/18/2006

NFL Report: Two tight ends, shotgun help teams stop the blitzUpdated 10/18/2006 4:13 PM ET

By Jim Corbett, USA TODAY

More teams are bringing the blitz this season, and ESPN analyst Ron Jaworski says two trends have emerged in response to that increased pressure.

"When you have two tight ends, it makes you more balanced than having a strong-side set; it makes it more guesswork for the defense," Whisenhunt says. "Plus, the reason some teams are lining up a tight end in the backfield is that it's harder and harder to find a good fullback these days, and the tight end is a better receiver out of the backfield most times than a fullback would be."

Jack Anderson, Washington Post, June 26, 2008

When the Redskins drafted tight end Fred Davis with a second-round pick, many fans' initial reaction was that the pick was wasted. <snip>

The two-tight-end set creates a matchup nightmare for opposing coaches, and Zorn was wise to stick with his convictions that more offense is needed to help Campbell. Now that he has accomplished this, it's time to put the pieces into action.

From Sports Illustrated 2006

Bill Parcells' booming voice filled with excitement last week when I asked why he switched this season to two tight ends in his base offense...<snip>

, the Cowboys switched to the Detroit Package by surprisingly plucking Fasano from Notre Dame in the second round of the 2006 draft. According to league insiders, the decision stunned the Bengals, who had targeted Fasano two spots later.<snip>

These were on the other Jets board.

But yea...who needs 2 talented TE's...especially ones just a "blocking TE" whatever the ***** that is.

These are some decent points, but note that these three years worth of articles the two high draft picks used were #2s. Fred Davis was total trash, caught three balls and was inactive because he kept blowing assignments. It would be nice to have a couple of more TEs, but at #17 you need impact. I honestly don't believe a blocking TE is going to give us that kind of impact, but it depends who else is on the board.

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These are some decent points, but note that these three years worth of articles the two high draft picks used were #2s. Fred Davis was total trash, caught three balls and was inactive because he kept blowing assignments. It would be nice to have a couple of more TEs, but at #17 you need impact. I honestly don't believe a blocking TE is going to give us that kind of impact, but it depends who else is on the board.

Exactly.

All these people falling in love with Pettigrew will realize he's nothing more than Daniel Graham, and what a waste of a 1st round pick that will be.

Take a Wide Receiver who will START, as opposed to a blocking Tight End that you can get in Round 3 or Round 4. If you take a blocking TE at 17 and a WR in Round 3 or Round 4, you have 0 starters. Do it the other way around, at least you have two starters.

Pettigrew = Trash.

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