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Head up: Damian Woody is on Jim Rome (with Meshawn)


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HAHA anyone hear Keyshawn's sign off.

He was talking about Sanchez handlin the NY Media and he goes "Many had to handle it, I had to handle it and now you'll have to handle it. The only difference is you'll have the damn ball every play"

Or something along those lines.

Classic.

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keshawn was never more than a very tall possesion reciever.

:rl: :rl: :rl:

Clearly you weren't a Jets fan while Keyshawn was in New York.

When Key was in NY, he was much, much more than a possession guy. Later in his career he turned into that type of player, but he was a stud early on.

Coles & Cotchery cannot sniff what Key did 1998-99.

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:rl: :rl: :rl:

Clearly you weren't a Jets fan while Keyshawn was in New York.

When Key was in NY, he was much, much more than a possession guy. Later in his career he turned into that type of player, but he was a stud early on.

Coles & Cotchery cannot sniff what Key did 1998-99.

So he was steller for 2 years. Big phucking deal. He was a First player picked, and we replaced him with a 2nd and a 4th rounder. Job well done by the Jets.

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So he was steller for 2 years. Big phucking deal. He was a First player picked, and we replaced him with a 2nd and a 4th rounder. Job well done by the Jets.

And neither played like he could.

And he was actually "stellar" until 2003.

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Your opinion, not the fact.

Actually, that is the fact. He was a stellar, true #1 WR until 2003. Coles & Cotchery are life long #2's. There is a difference between a true #1 and just being labeled a #1. Keyshawn was a true #1, Coles was just labeled that way, as Cotchery is now.

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Actually, that is the fact. He was a stellar, true #1 WR until 2003. Coles & Cotchery are life long #2's. There is a difference between a true #1 and just being labeled a #1. Keyshawn was a true #1, Coles was just labeled that way, as Cotchery is now.

That post is full of logical falacies.

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So he was steller for 2 years. Big phucking deal. He was a First player picked, and we replaced him with a 2nd and a 4th rounder. Job well done by the Jets.

This is borderline comical...the Jets have yet to replace KJ after all of these years. Anyone recall his stats in the playoff game against the Jags? and the interception at the end

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Keyshawn was a very good WR but he was never 1/100th as good as he thought he was.

I'd say he was an above average posession guy who was great at pulling down a jump ball in a crowd.

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Keyshawn was a very good WR but he was never 1/100th as good as he thought he was.

I'd say he was an above average posession guy who was great at pulling down a jump ball in a crowd.

True, and we still haven't matched his talent at the WR spot.

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All right, time to bring some stats into the discussion.

Keyshawn's stats as a Jet:

1996: 63 catches, 844 yds, 8 TD's

1997: 70 catches, 963 yds, 5 TD's

1998: 83 catches, 1131 yds, 10 TD's

1999: 89 catches, 1170 yds, 8 TD's

*Also won Super Bowl with Tampa Bay, had 1266 yds that season

Coles's stats as a Jet:

2000: 22 catches, 370 yds, 1 TD

2001: 59 catches, 868 yds, 7 TD's

2002: 89 catches, 1264 yds, 5 TD's

2003-2004: with Washington

2005: 73 catches, 845 yds, 5 TD's

2006: 91 catches, 1098 yds, 6 TD's

2007: 55 catches, 646 yds, 6 TD's

2008: 70 catches, 850 yds, 7 TD's

Keyshawn's average season: 76 catches, 1027 yds, 8 TD's

Coles's average season (excluding 2000): 73 catches, 929 yds, 6 TD's

Even when removing Coles's rookie year, Keyshawn's numbers are better. And that doesn't even bring up the fact that, as was said before, Keyshawn was a better blocker, had less drops, went over the middle more, and made plenty more catches in the "spectacular" variety than Coles did. He also was a big reason we made the AFC Title game in 1998, and why the Bucs won the Super Bowl in 2002.

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All right, time to bring some stats into the discussion.

Keyshawn's stats as a Jet:

1996: 63 catches, 844 yds, 8 TD's

1997: 70 catches, 963 yds, 5 TD's

1998: 83 catches, 1131 yds, 10 TD's

1999: 89 catches, 1170 yds, 8 TD's

*Also won Super Bowl with Tampa Bay, had 1266 yds that season

Coles's stats as a Jet:

2000: 22 catches, 370 yds, 1 TD

2001: 59 catches, 868 yds, 7 TD's

2002: 89 catches, 1264 yds, 5 TD's

2003-2004: with Washington

2005: 73 catches, 845 yds, 5 TD's

2006: 91 catches, 1098 yds, 6 TD's

2007: 55 catches, 646 yds, 6 TD's

2008: 70 catches, 850 yds, 7 TD's

Keyshawn's average season: 76 catches, 1027 yds, 8 TD's

Coles's average season (excluding 2000): 73 catches, 929 yds, 6 TD's

Even when removing Coles's rookie year, Keyshawn's numbers are better. And that doesn't even bring up the fact that, as was said before, Keyshawn was a better blocker, had less drops, went over the middle more, and made plenty more catches in the "spectacular" variety than Coles did. He also was a big reason we made the AFC Title game in 1998, and why the Bucs won the Super Bowl in 2002.

Coles playes a lot of seasons with Chad which meant he spent a lot of time standing around waiting for the ball to get there whereas Keys best season came with Vinny T and Brad Johnson. Both QBs with strong arms who could hit a WR in stride.

The fact that Coles was only 100 yds and 2 TDs less per year than Key is pretty impressive to me. I would have expected a much larger gap.

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