Jump to content

heritage / ancestor....


gg

Recommended Posts

this came up in the prized possession thread..

tell us about your ancestors, or your heritage..

i will post mine later, just running out now...

i think this could be cool.

please post only serious replies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 97
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Norwegian

my parents actually found their ancestors a few years ago and visited Norway. They said some people traveled 1,000 miles to be there by car and gas aint cheap over there !

one good story, some dude lives in a wood cabin. My dad asks what the 6' long pole is for ? answer : "defending against bear attacks when coming back from the fjord with your haul of fish !"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Italian!!

My mother was born in Naples, my Nonno is from Parma, and my Nonna is from Avellino (small town by Naples). My grandfather has been in the wine business throughout his whole life (Opici), we're pretty much a big wine family.

My father is 100% Italian as well, but he wasn't born there like my mom. His Grandparents were all from the Lazio region.

We love food, wine, soccer, and we speak Italian. I love my heritage and I hope to teach my children the language and let it live on!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, man, you should see some of the photos I have. I'll have to scan and post some. I'm an adoptee, so the ethnic background can get a little cloudy for folks.

Natural biology is Italian/Dutch/Scottish/English, and I'm whiter than white! Can't get any whiter! We always laugh around here because I put mozzarella to shame. Adoptive line is as purely Sicilian as you can get with no deviation all the way down the line. Palermo people.

EDIT & P.S.: My Daddy was an immigrant (Sicilian born in Buenos Aires), Mom was first generation. Mom was born on 1st Ave. Every time I go to Veniero's, I try to walk by the apartment. She was always so proud of it, and loved to point it out. "I was born there!"

My Daddy got his nose busted with a baseball bat by an Irish gang on the streets of Manhattan when he was a kid. He refused to fix it all of his life. My Daddy was also the coolest dude to ever walk the planet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm about as Italian as you can get. First generation. Mom and Dad were both from Cantanzaro, Calabria - although they met here in Massachusetts. My Grandfather has been here for a while, trying is establish a life and a living. My Dad came by ship two years later - and then a year later the rest of the family came (grandmother, aunt and uncle). Bacause of some red-tape (paperwork) they lived in a one bedroom apartment in Brooklyn, NY for a few months before making their way to MA. Pretty much the same story for my Mom's side of the family - except she had seven siblings. Three boys, five girls (including my mom who was the third oldest). I don't see much of my Mom's side of the family. Just kind of worked out that way. Anyway.....

So many of the old traditions still live on and I love them. Late Fall is wine making time. Dead of winter is Sopressata and cappicola making time. My aunt still jars her own tomatoes for sauce. My dad, aunt and Uncle still grow these tremedous and huge vegtable gardens. I've been eating organic since childhood! I remember playing hide and seek amongst the rows and rows of towering beanstocks. It was fun!

I spoke very little English going into kindergarten. Whatever my aunt, bugs bunny, the flintones and the jetsons taught me! I managed to survive, and eventually thrive. I have very strong feelings about ESL programs in schools nowadays. I think it's a bunch of phooey. If I can do it, anyone can. No cructhes. Sink or swim, I say.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm about as Italian as you can get. First generation. Mom and Dad were both from Cantanzaro, Calabria - although they met here in Massachusetts. My Grandfather has been here for a while, trying is establish a life and a living. My Dad came by ship two years later - and then a year later the rest of the family came (grandmother, aunt and uncle). Bacause of some red-tape (paperwork) they lived in a one bedroom apartment in Brooklyn, NY for a few months before making their way to MA.

So many of the old traditions still live on and I love them. Late Fall is wine making time. Dead of winter is Sopressata and cappicola making time. My aunt still jars her own tomatoes for sauce. My dad, aunt and Uncle still grow these tremedous and huge vegtable gardens. I've been eating organic since childhood! I remember playing hide and seek amongst the rows and rows of towering beanstocks. It was fun!

I spoke very little English going into kindergarten. Whatever my aunt, bugs bunny, the flintones and the jetsons taught me! I managed to survive, and eventually thrive. I have very strong feelings about ESL programs in schools nowadays. I think it's a bunch of phooey. If I can do it, anyone can. No cructhes. Sink or swim, I say.

Awesome. We still jar our own sauce too. We have a huge grape garden and we grow all of our own stuff (basil, rosemary, tomatoes, you name it!). Being Italian is awesome.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome. We still jar our own sauce too. We have a huge grape garden and we grow all of our own stuff (basil, rosemary, tomatoes, you name it!). Being Italian is awesome.

I dig Italianos..specailly if they can do this

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tw0D-Rv_vro&hl=en&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tw0D-Rv_vro&hl=en&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome. We still jar our own sauce too. We have a huge grape garden and we grow all of our own stuff (basil, rosemary, tomatoes, you name it!). Being Italian is awesome.

It is pretty cool. My Dad grows grapes too - and has a fig tree, cherry tree, peach and apple as well. Also has a patch of strawberries going. Frickin' Farmer Tony! LOL!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

German-

I was born in Germany and moved to the States when I was 3. Much of my family is still over there, but we get to see each other fairly often. My German is a little rusty, but I pick it back up again pretty quickly.

My grandmother walks down to the market every day for fresh ingredients for 'mittagessen', which is the large meal of the day. In Germany, and I imagine many other countries, the large meal of the day is in the early afternoon. Then they have a lighter meal later in the evening.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I spoke very little English going into kindergarten. Whatever my aunt, bugs bunny, the flintones and the jetsons taught me! I managed to survive, and eventually thrive. I have very strong feelings about ESL programs in schools nowadays. I think it's a bunch of phooey. If I can do it, anyone can. No cructhes. Sink or swim, I say.
Same thing with my folks. They 'learned' English in school without being 'taught' the language because they had to. An entire classroom of kids where the majority didn't speak English and they all persevered without being catered to. Imagine that.

Today, no red pen for corrections on test papers! That'll cause damage! Purple pen is the old red. No score-keeping in soccer! What about old-fashioned failure and picking yourself up by your bootstraps? Kids today and the cushion culture that surrounds it, get out of town. We used to ride our bikes like a pack of dogs on Northern Blvd. in Queens with no physical protection when I was young. You got me going, Beans.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Same thing with my folks. They 'learned' English in school without being 'taught' the language because they had to. An entire classroom of kids where the majority didn't speak English and they all persevered without being catered to. Imagine that.

Today, no red pen for corrections on test papers! That'll cause damage! Purple pen is the old red. No score-keeping in soccer! What about old-fashioned failure and picking yourself up by your bootstraps? Kids today and the cushion culture that surrounds it, get out of town. We used to ride our bikes like a pack of dogs on Northern Blvd. in Queens with no physical protection when I was young. You got me going, Beans.

When we first moved here, we spoke no English either. There was a TV show where they were talking about having to kill all germs. Scared the hell out of my mom.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Same thing with my folks. They 'learned' English in school without being 'taught' the language because they had to. An entire classroom of kids where the majority didn't speak English and they all persevered without being catered to. Imagine that.

Today, no red pen for corrections on test papers! That'll cause damage! Purple pen is the old red. No score-keeping in soccer! What about old-fashioned failure and picking yourself up by your bootstraps? Kids today and the cushion culture that surrounds it, get out of town. We used to ride our bikes like a pack of dogs on Northern Blvd. in Queens with no physical protection when I was young. You got me going, Beans.

My Mom moved from Ukraine when she was 7. Came to NYC and when she graduated high school she won the English Medal in her NYC Public High School, with ZERO accent.

Problem is arrogance of new immigrants and the ACLU demanding we change USA to cater to thier needs. To make it here, you need to prove you can adapt and be a winner..We dont need no stinkin losers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Mom moved from Ukraine when she was 7. Came to NYC and when she graduated high school she won the English Medal in her NYC Public High School..

Problem is arrogance of new immigrants and the ACLU demanding we change USA to cater to thier needs. To make it here, you need to prove you can adapt and be a winner..We dont need no stinkin losers.

Bravo, SJ and Jeto! Seriously, to acclimate does not mean losing your heritage. I am living proof.

I went from being able to say "hello" and "good bye" and not much else, to being enrolled in speech therapy class in first grade because I was having a very hard time with "th" words....there, thought, them, etc. You see, there is no "th" sound in Italian. I lasted one session. The teacher has these blocks and my job was to place the blocks in their corresponding spots properly. What that had to do with "th" remains a mystery to this day. So, I buzzed through the excersize quite quickly - and when I got to the last block I threw it at his face and proclaimed "I'm not stupid!" and walked out and walked home MAD. I had attitude. Anyway, the teacher said he didn't want to see me again. Good. So, where was I? Oh, yah, by fifth grade I was the English teachers favorite and by high school I was in English honors. For about ten years a story I had written was part of the required reading for all incoming Freshmen at my high school. Take that, p-word ESL, Bi-lingual learning proponents!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bravo, SJ and Jeto! Seriously, to acclimate does not mean losing your heritage. I am living proof.

I went from being able to say "hello" and "good bye" and not much else, to being enrolled in speech therapy class in first grade because I was having a very hard time with "th" words....there, thought, them, etc. You see, there is no "th" sound in Italian. I lasted one session. The teacher has these blocks and my job was to place the blocks in their corresponding spots properly. What that had to do with "th" remains a mystery to this day. So, I buzzed through the excersize quite quickly - and when I got to the last block I threw it at his face and proclaimed "I'm not stupid!" and walked out and walked home MAD. I had attitude. Anyway, the teacher said he didn't want to see me again. Good. So, where was I? Oh, yah, by fifth grade I was the English teachers favorite and by high school I was in English honors. For about ten years a story I had wrote was part of the required reading for all incoming Freshmen at my high school. Take that, p-word ESL, Bi-lingual learning proponents!

More props for doing it with all that bahstanese thing going on around you

;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Mom moved from Ukraine when she was 7. Came to NYC and when she graduated high school she won the English Medal in her NYC Public High School, with ZERO accent.

Problem is arrogance of new immigrants and the ACLU demanding we change USA to cater to thier needs. To make it here, you need to prove you can adapt and be a winner..We dont need no stinkin losers.

I agree. I dont like the fact that I have to press "1" for English in an English speaking country. I think in order for people to move here they should be fluent in English. We shouldnt have to cater to their needs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1st generation born to a immigrant parents who moved to the US as adults. Both parents are from the same small town in Sicily in the province of Messina. The whole line on both sides is from Sicily going back as many generations as I have been able to track.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bravo, SJ and Jeto! Seriously, to acclimate does not mean losing your heritage. I am living proof.

I went from being able to say "hello" and "good bye" and not much else, to being enrolled in speech therapy class in first grade because I was having a very hard time with "th" words....there, thought, them, etc. You see, there is no "th" sound in Italian. I lasted one session. The teacher has these blocks and my job was to place the blocks in their corresponding spots properly. What that had to do with "th" remains a mystery to this day. So, I buzzed through the excersize quite quickly - and when I got to the last block I threw it at his face and proclaimed "I'm not stupid!" and walked out and walked home MAD. I had attitude. Anyway, the teacher said he didn't want to see me again. Good. So, where was I? Oh, yah, by fifth grade I was the English teachers favorite and by high school I was in English honors. For about ten years a story I had wrote was part of the required reading for all incoming Freshmen at my high school. Take that, p-word ESL, Bi-lingual learning proponents!

Well, that's the problem right there. Many folks don't WANT to acclimate, stay insular on purpose, and expect the U.S. to write stuff in their native tongue. Where else on earth but the U.S. can you make such demands and get them? I won't go the chicken chit route and blame it on 'advertising', either. You go on certain bus or subway lines, and NOTHING is in English - period. That's just bulls hit. When in Rome, do as the Romans, hello. I would never go to live in another country and even ENTERTAIN that sort of arrogance - and I'm as arrogant as they come.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm also adopted. My bloodline is 75% Irish and 25% Lithuanian.

My mother was Irish/Welsh, my father was pure Czech. He was proud of his heritage. I have a map of the country that dates back well before WWII. It's something I probably need to get preserved. My brother and I talk about it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...