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Was starting Sanchez the right move?


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December, 23, 2009

By Tim Graham

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Was making quarterback Mark Sanchez a full-time starter in his first season the right call by the Jets?Soon enough, Rex Ryan will have been correct.

The rookie coach mistakenly said the New York Jets had been eliminated from the playoff race Sunday after crumbling to the Atlanta Falcons. Turns out, there still is a mathematical ray of hope.

For now.

The Jets sacrificed a season that appeared destined for the playoffs. They rank No. 1 in scoring defense, total defense and passing defense. They lead the NFL in rushing offense.

That sort of formula should have clinched a postseason berth by now.

Problem is, Mark Sanchez is part of the equation, too.

But was the Jets' decision to start Sanchez straight out of college complete rubbish?

The Jets threw away their season, but maybe it will have been worth it in the long run.

"When you're going to develop an outstanding quarterback, you're just going to have to bite the bullet and not look back," former St. Louis Rams head coach and offensive guru Mike Martz said.

The dilemma when it comes to rookie quarterbacks is whether it's more beneficial to put them in the huddle or to let them watch from the sidelines for a season.

"In the big picture, it's all a step in the right direction," said former Jets quarterback Ken O'Brien, who started five of the 10 games he played as a rookie in 1984. "The best way to learn is to play."

That theory is not absolute.

"Some guys, like Peyton Manning or Troy Aikman, take that first-year beating, and it makes them better for the long run," Scouts Inc. analyst Matt Williamson said. "Some guys are not mentally strong enough to overcome a terrible rookie year, and the confidence can be shot."

The Jets seemed like geniuses three weeks into the season. They were 3-0, and Sanchez was performing beyond his years. The former University of Southern California star played as though he'd been in the league two or three years already, apparently turning what Matt Ryan and Joe Flacco achieved last year into a trend.

Since then, Sanchez's season has been spotted by a series of youthful indiscretions that ranged from immature (scarfing down a hot dog during a game) to reckless (injuring his knee while diving head-first three days after New York Yankees manager Joe Girardi taught him how to slide).

The hot start is a distant memory. Entering Week 16 against the Indianapolis Colts, the Jets are 7-7 and on the fringes of the playoff race.

The recurring theme, however, will be those interceptions. They came in big bunches. Three, four, sometimes five at a time.

Sanchez has thrown at least three interceptions in four of his 13 starts. The Jets went 0-4 in those games, losing by an average of 9.3 points. They dropped two of them at the Meadowlands by a field goal.

"There are times when he's looked great against complex schemes," said Jon Ritchie, an analyst for ESPN's "First Take" and former Oakland Raiders and Philadelphia Eagles fullback, "and there are times when he's looked confused out there. That's what everyone expected."

USC coach Pete Carroll was labeled a unappreciative whiner when Sanchez decided he would forego his senior season and enter the draft.

Carroll claimed Sanchez wasn't ready. Sanchez started one full season, and while he posted remarkable numbers, he would head to the NFL with only 16 collegiate starts. The learning curve would be one harsh arc.

The Jets traded up to draft Sanchez fifth overall and make him the face of the franchise. He would have to fall flat on his facemask to not win the job from veteran Kellen Clemens in training camp. Sanchez signed a five-year contract, which also escalated his timetable. Six years is the common length of a highly drafted quarterback's first deal.

"It's a tough situation for anybody to come in right out of college, where you didn't play much, and plug in," O'Brien said. "It just takes time."

What has been troubling about Sanchez's development is that Ryan and offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer have needed to simplify it as the season has progressed. Ryan, who is dyslexic, applied one his own comprehension tricks and color-coded Sanchez's play-calling wristband to underscore the importance of ball security.

"He doesn't seem to be learning from his mistakes or getting better in any way," Williamson said. "He still really doesn't understand coverages or the speed of the game at this level. He isn't seeing things clearly and is either very rushed or too slow in everything he does."

Martz and O'Brien insisted Sanchez will come around.

Martz stressed the importance of the Jets acquiring more help for Sanchez at receiver and spending a lot of time working together during his first full NFL offseason. Dropping top receiver Braylon Edwards into Sanchez' lap in Week 5 didn't do him any favors.

"There's a little bit of a disconnect with them, which is understandable," said Martz, who 10 years ago in St. Louis ran the record-setting offense dubbed "The Greatest Show on Turf."

"That rapport and that chemistry, it takes a long time to develop. I don't think people realize how difficult that is. There's thousands of throws that need to happen."

Sanchez has been one of the NFL's worst play-action passers. He ranks 27th in the NFL with a 58.8 play-action passer rating, completing 52 percent of his throws with three touchdowns and seven interceptions.

"It's just a matter of repetition," O'Brien said. "It's a lot more beneficial to watching yourself on film and having recall of which decisions to make. You can figure out 'This is what I did last time and I was knucklehead. Let's forget about that.'

"You store it all away. Your mind becomes a vault. You have to click through all those pictures, that video game in your head and dial in that right formula the next time you come across it."

As for the toll a disappointing first season can have, jangled confidence shouldn't be an issue with Sanchez. His leadership intangibles might be what carry him.

"The good players, they have such a deep-seated belief in themselves that they might be shaken a bit," Martz said, "but they just can't be moved off the mark. He's got too much going."

Teammates recognize that. Ritchie, who went to the playoffs with Rich Gannon and Donovan McNabb, noted the guys in the locker room are willing to forgive mistakes and weigh the future benefits when they see a young quarterback committing himself at the facility, whether it be on the practice field or in the film room.

"Guys know that he's putting in all the time in and that he is sacrificing to do everything that he can to get better," Ritchie said. "He's a guy you love to have on your team and will be much improved. That rookie wall hits everyone, and you come to the conclusion that he's hit that.

"But a guy that has such an unbelievable attitude, positivity surround him all the time, can lead a group of men who have been playing in the league just with his sheer charisma. That played into their decision and I can't fault them there."

So don't be so anxious about throwing away this season, Jets fans.

When we look back on 2009, Sanchez will have junked the Jets' chance to make the playoffs. But Sanchez's long-term future might turn out to be worth forfeiting the postseason.

"He'll be so much better next year," Martz said. "It was absolutely the right thing to do. That team will evolve with him."

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great read,,liked Martz words at end..

"He'll be so much better next year," Martz said. "It was absolutely the right thing to do. That team will evolve with him."

I friggin hope so SJ-we're running out of seasons to waste being the resident old guys here and all...

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I friggin hope so SJ-we're running out of seasons to waste being the resident old guys here and all...

its all good..I definitly think next year will be greta..

Jenkins back, leon back will help sanchez in pass game as the D cant stack box in tight so much since we will have outside run threat and pass RB threat..

a whole offseason styudyin and throwin in mini/camp to WRs wont hurt either

have to fix special teams, another WR

hell we are in meaningful games in Dec with a rook qb, a rook coach, allpro NT jenks out, allpro RB/special teamer Leon out..not too bad when you think about it..

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I would say the answer is yes it was the right move unless you believe one of the following:

1) The Jets were super bowl contenders with a veteran quarterback. Not playoff contenders or even a playoff lock. Super bowl contenders. Sanchez was going likely to take his lumps in his first year anyway (this year or next). While its possible that starting him next year would have lessened the mistakes, I would say that its better to get the mistakes, getting used to game speed, etc out of the way now this year. That is unless you truly believe if not for Sanchez the team had a super bowl shot.

2) The first year damages Sanchez psychologically. Time will tell on this one, but I submit that if the first year could have that type of damage, he would not have worked out in this town anyway. New York is arguably the toughest place to play and Jet fans are not known for their patience. Simply put, you need to be mentally tough to play in New York.

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I would say the answer is yes it was the right move unless you believe one of the following:

1) The Jets were super bowl contenders with a veteran quarterback. Not playoff contenders or even a playoff lock. Super bowl contenders. Sanchez was going likely to take his lumps in his first year anyway (this year or next). While its possible that starting him next year would have lessened the mistakes, I would say that its better to get the mistakes, getting used to game speed, etc out of the way now this year. That is unless you truly believe if not for Sanchez the team had a super bowl shot.

2) The first year damages Sanchez psychologically. Time will tell on this one, but I submit that if the first year could have that type of damage, he would not have worked out in this town anyway. New York is arguably the toughest place to play and Jet fans are not known for their patience. Simply put, you need to be mentally tough to play in New York.

1 - maybe until jenks and leon went down..

2- from what i see, its not a issue,,ryan leaf in his failures was a dope on sidelines and in interviews,,this kid seems to 'get it'

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The Jets sacrificed a season that appeared destined for the playoffs. They rank No. 1 in scoring defense, total defense and passing defense. They lead the NFL in rushing offense.

this is the dumbest quote in the article.......no one could have possibly known what the running game and the defense would do this year.

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this is the dumbest quote in the article.......no one could have possibly known what the running game and the defense would do this year.

Exactly. I don't have the energy to look it up now, but I would almost guarantee that the same author predicted a 6 or 7 win season before the season.

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I agree with Mike Martz.

"When you're going to develop an outstanding quarterback, you're just going to have to bite the bullet and not look back," former St. Louis Rams head coach and offensive guru Mike Martz said.

Martz stressed the importance of the Jets acquiring more help for Sanchez at receiver and spending a lot of time working together during his first full NFL offseason. Dropping top receiver Braylon Edwards into Sanchez' lap in Week 5 didn't do him any favors.

"There's a little bit of a disconnect with them, which is understandable," said Martz, who 10 years ago in St. Louis ran the record-setting offense dubbed "The Greatest Show on Turf."

"That rapport and that chemistry, it takes a long time to develop. I don't think people realize how difficult that is. There's thousands of throws that need to happen."

"The good players, they have such a deep-seated belief in themselves that they might be shaken a bit," Martz said, "but they just can't be moved off the mark. He's got too much going."

"He'll be so much better next year," Martz said. "It was absolutely the right thing to do. That team will evolve with him."

And as far as this is concerned...

Sanchez has been one of the NFL's worst play-action passers. He ranks 27th in the NFL with a 58.8 play-action passer rating, completing 52 percent of his throws with three touchdowns and seven interceptions.

Maybe Schottie could try a play action pass on a down where the Jets might otherwise be expected to run. Faking a handoff on third & long isn't fooling anyone.

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Exactly. The 20/20 hindsight and the handwringing over something no one would have predicted in a million years is laughable.

exacto mundo...

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Edited by SouthernJet
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They should have let him sit the first 5-6 games and learn, if only to get his body and mind in the right places to play. Not only is he physically immature, but he seems to be mentally immature, as well.

Those who want to say that the playing time is serving him well don't address how horribly he's regressed since the opening three games of the season. Rick Mirer went 3-2 in his first five starts in Seattle before his career took a dive when opposing DC's figured out he wouldn't throw to his left, and his career plummeted. Obviously, opposing teams have a book on Sanchez that includes some ridiculously poor tendencies he has that may have been worked out if he was able to sit and watch a vet play for a month or two. As is, because Sanchez has gone directly into the toilet in terms of his decision-making and ability to lead the team, I don't see the payoff to playing him early.

Now, you're going into the off-season, presumably with a new offensive coordinator, and we have to hope that Sanchez can 1) restore his own confidence 2) learn a new system 3) Get his knees and body ready to take the beating of an NFL season and 4) Show up to camp ready to regain his teammates' confidence in him. A tall order for a young dude, imo.

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I thought all along we should have had a vet to help "Sanchize" with the transition but I wasn't opposed to him starting from day one. Right now I really wish we had picked up a vet like Jeff Garcia, maybe I'm being a prisoner of the moment but who doesn't wish we had him right now? I'm hoping this Sanchez thing works out as much as the rest of you but I'm so tired of looking to the"future" and reading up on the ****ing draft while other fans are talking playoffs. It's hard to stomach the fact we're not going to the playoffs with the number one defense in the league when it seems like Sanchez is making no progress and if anything is regressing. I'll be the really drunk one at the final game again this season, no reason to end this season any other way then blacked out

Edited by SayNoToDMC
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They should have let him sit the first 5-6 games and learn, if only to get his body and mind in the right places to play. Not only is he physically immature, but he seems to be mentally immature, as well.

Those who want to say that the playing time is serving him well don't address how horribly he's regressed since the opening three games of the season. Rick Mirer went 3-2 in his first five starts in Seattle before his career took a dive when opposing DC's figured out he wouldn't throw to his left, and his career plummeted. Obviously, opposing teams have a book on Sanchez that includes some ridiculously poor tendencies he has that may have been worked out if he was able to sit and watch a vet play for a month or two. As is, because Sanchez has gone directly into the toilet in terms of his decision-making and ability to lead the team, I don't see the payoff to playing him early.

Now, you're going into the off-season, presumably with a new offensive coordinator, and we have to hope that Sanchez can 1) restore his own confidence 2) learn a new system 3) Get his knees and body ready to take the beating of an NFL season and 4) Show up to camp ready to regain his teammates' confidence in him. A tall order for a young dude, imo.

Correct me if I'm wrong sir, but I remember the two of us predicting this precise situation would be the inevitable result of drafting/starting Sanchez. It was obvious that he was gonna play like a rookie QB and get crucified by the fans and there was nothing anyone could do to stop it, sadly.

Anyway guys, think about what other options we really had here.

1) We start Clemens, we might make the playoffs, but maybe not. 1 and done at most.

OR,

2) We sign and start Garcia (if he's willing). We probably make the playoffs, and he IS good but I just don't see him leading us to a superbowl at his age and condition.

Results of either 2 = no super bowl. Sanchez maybe learns a bit, maybe not but either way no super bowl. Especially without Jenkins and Leon.

Since the only thing we really care about is a super bowl (after 40 years), it does little good to leave Sanchez on the bench. Let him develop on the field w/ the up and coming team that we have and maybe in 2, 3, 4 or 5 years we can get our long awaited championship.

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They should have let him sit the first 5-6 games and learn, if only to get his body and mind in the right places to play. Not only is he physically immature, but he seems to be mentally immature, as well.

Those who want to say that the playing time is serving him well don't address how horribly he's regressed since the opening three games of the season. Rick Mirer went 3-2 in his first five starts in Seattle before his career took a dive when opposing DC's figured out he wouldn't throw to his left, and his career plummeted. Obviously, opposing teams have a book on Sanchez that includes some ridiculously poor tendencies he has that may have been worked out if he was able to sit and watch a vet play for a month or two. As is, because Sanchez has gone directly into the toilet in terms of his decision-making and ability to lead the team, I don't see the payoff to playing him early.

Now, you're going into the off-season, presumably with a new offensive coordinator, and we have to hope that Sanchez can 1) restore his own confidence 2) learn a new system 3) Get his knees and body ready to take the beating of an NFL season and 4) Show up to camp ready to regain his teammates' confidence in him. A tall order for a young dude, imo.

Insanity = what you post.

When a super-raw QB has to think about his footwork, where he is in the pocket, how much time he's been holding the ball, how far the ball is from his body, and probably some throwing mechanics corrections as well, he needs to watch first. You get those things in order first (or at least mostly in order first). Then have him breaking down that week's opponents' tendencies all over the field to allow him to use that knowledge properly without 20 things going off in his mind at the same time.

How does anyone expect him to read the defense properly in split-second time, and instantaneously relate it to any what-to-do's he went over during the course of the week, if he's thinking about when and where to slide in the pocket, how far the ball is being held from his body, and even in which fashion to slide if he runs out of the pocket? He may be able to answer all those "What do you do in this situation?" questions in a classroom, but on the field he has less than one second to think of what the problem is, what to do about it, and tell his body to do what his brain says, and all that has to happen while thinking about fundamentals that should be second-nature (but aren't yet) before he takes the field.

Basically, there's a lot of fundamentals stuff that should have been second-nature to him first. Doesn't help that on top of everything he's in this offense with all its stupid extra motion and garbage on top of the low percentage of pass plays called with a safety outlet. Further that with there being absolutely no veteran QB on the team who has ever had even half of a successful NFL season.

He'll eventually get it, and hopefully it'll be next season. But if you wanted me to script a way to ruin a QB for the long term, this would be how I would do it. Maybe even more so than on a team with help all around him, because on a team like that he wouldn't have to deal with the mental letdowns of knowing he's probably the worst football player on the field.

If it all works out in the end it will be a testament to Sanchez himself, because the team really handled him horribly.

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MS is a bum. Were soooo stooopid! It;s like 'The Emporers New Clothes". No one wants to say the obvious...HE'S NAKED AS A JAYBIRD !!! Whats this business about "learning on the job"? This loser IS NOT READY....HELLO!...NOT READY! After all these years of loyalty, Im getting really tired of rooting for this LOSING ASS ORGANIZATION!! Problem is ..I got no choice. Always with the bonehead move. This offense is offensive, and almost Unwatchable! Its boring, predactable, and whats worse, this QB plays as if it were a high-octane style. All of our plays are vanilla, yet he doesnt even understand how to run an offense without his "Red-Yellow-Green " training wheels . The fans blame the defense. Thats just plain crazy-talk. NO defense can be expected to stop Everyone! NOT REALITY! However, the offense must be able to score. This is not a FG league. Our offense needs to do the league minimum of production for us to win (at least) This is pathetic, Sanchez is NOT an NFL QB, and we r a laughingstock every week...I HATE THIS!!!:russian::character0269:

Edited by The Mytee Markjets
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Correct me if I'm wrong sir, but I remember the two of us predicting this precise situation would be the inevitable result of drafting/starting Sanchez. It was obvious that he was gonna play like a rookie QB and get crucified by the fans and there was nothing anyone could do to stop it, sadly.

Anyway guys, think about what other options we really had here.

1) We start Clemens, we might make the playoffs, but maybe not. 1 and done at most.

OR,

2) We sign and start Garcia (if he's willing). We probably make the playoffs, and he IS good but I just don't see him leading us to a superbowl at his age and condition.

Results of either 2 = no super bowl. Sanchez maybe learns a bit, maybe not but either way no super bowl. Especially without Jenkins and Leon.

Since the only thing we really care about is a super bowl (after 40 years), it does little good to leave Sanchez on the bench. Let him develop on the field w/ the up and coming team that we have and maybe in 2, 3, 4 or 5 years we can get our long awaited championship.

Terrific post.

We've been hearing this "built to win now" BS around here since Bruce Coslet brought in Ronnie Lott. It's amazing that people continue to believe it being that we've only had one 11 win season in all of that time. We'll really be built to win now when we have a franchise QB in place. The one thing our potential franchise QB lacks is experience. Throwing him out on the field behind a solid OL and with a defense that can protect him is a good thing.

That 3-0 start was a tease. It probably would've been better this year (for Sanchez) if the Jets were never in the playoff hunt. I hope he goes out these last two games and just has fun. Jets could need a lot of points in each of them. Then study and practice over the offseason, and come back better.

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MS is a bum. Were soooo stooopid! It;s like 'The Emporers New Clothes". No one wants to say the obvious...HE'S NAKED AS A JAYBIRD !!! Whats this business about "learning on the job"? This loser IS NOT READY....HELLO!...NOT READY! After all these years of loyalty, Im getting really tired of rooting for this losing ass organization!! Problem is ..I got no choice. Always with the bonehead move. This offense is offensive, and almost Unwatchable! Its boring, predactable, and whats worse, this qb plays as if it were a high-octane style. All of our plays are vanilla, yet he doesnt even understand how to run an offense without his "Red-Yellow-Green " training wheels . The fans blame the defense. Thats just plain crazy-talk. NO defense can be expected to stop Everyone! NOT REALITY! However, the offense must be able to score. This is not a FG league. Our offense needs to do the league minimum of production for us to win (at least) This is pathetic, Sanchez is NOT an NFL QB, and we r a laughingstock every week...I HATE THIS!!!:russian::character0269:

You're an example of what I don't want in a fellow fan of this team.

Your vag was so damp for the guy in November that you sign up with "Mytee Mark" as your screen name, and then in December the guy's a laughingstock bum.

Any idea who the real laughingstock is?

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Correct me if I'm wrong sir, but I remember the two of us predicting this precise situation would be the inevitable result of drafting/starting Sanchez. It was obvious that he was gonna play like a rookie QB and get crucified by the fans and there was nothing anyone could do to stop it, sadly.

Anyway guys, think about what other options we really had here.

1) We start Clemens, we might make the playoffs, but maybe not. 1 and done at most.

OR,

2) We sign and start Garcia (if he's willing). We probably make the playoffs, and he IS good but I just don't see him leading us to a superbowl at his age and condition.

Results of either 2 = no super bowl. Sanchez maybe learns a bit, maybe not but either way no super bowl. Especially without Jenkins and Leon.

Since the only thing we really care about is a super bowl (after 40 years), it does little good to leave Sanchez on the bench. Let him develop on the field w/ the up and coming team that we have and maybe in 2, 3, 4 or 5 years we can get our long awaited championship.

One of the few here who get it, well written.

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It has been painful, but given the options (Clemens, bringing in a journeyman vet), it was the right thing to do. I think game playing experience is a 100 times better than standing on the sidelines and holding a clipboard. When someone sits with him this off season and breaks down the film of every game, he will see what he did right and wrong and have the time to really analyze how to improve. A new OC would do wonders as well.

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MS Lacks FUNDAMENTALS ! Or are you blind. Dont start off your post by taking a dig at me, thats weak! I hate fans like you that have all the answers, yet refuse to admit the obvious.......HE"S NOT READY!!!! P.Carroll even said it . But YOU know more than Him too right?

Edited by The Mytee Markjets
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MS Lacks FUNDAMENTALS ! Or are you blind. Dont start off your post by taking a dig at me, thats weak! I hate fans like you that have all the answers, yet refuse to admit the obvious.......HE"S NOT READY!!!! P.Carroll even said it . But YOU know more than Him too right?

Pete Carroll's comments were self-serving. He wanted Sanchez to help him win games this year, and not to enter the draft.

Despite a crappy coordinator designing low-percentage passes, his lack of experience, and a game of musical chairs at at WR, Sanchez is having a pretty average rookie season. He clearly has some natural talent. Few rookies are ready, and yeah, he's probably less ready than most. Thing is, I knew that going into the season. I'm not surprised. I was all for him starting the year, and I still am. Either he has the mental toughness to learn from this season or he doesn't. And if he doesn't, then sitting him this year wasn't going to help him ever be an NFL QB, anyway.

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Correct me if I'm wrong sir, but I remember the two of us predicting this precise situation would be the inevitable result of drafting/starting Sanchez. It was obvious that he was gonna play like a rookie QB and get crucified by the fans and there was nothing anyone could do to stop it, sadly.

Anyway guys, think about what other options we really had here.

1) We start Clemens, we might make the playoffs, but maybe not. 1 and done at most.

OR,

2) We sign and start Garcia (if he's willing). We probably make the playoffs, and he IS good but I just don't see him leading us to a superbowl at his age and condition.

Results of either 2 = no super bowl. Sanchez maybe learns a bit, maybe not but either way no super bowl. Especially without Jenkins and Leon.

Since the only thing we really care about is a super bowl (after 40 years), it does little good to leave Sanchez on the bench. Let him develop on the field w/ the up and coming team that we have and maybe in 2, 3, 4 or 5 years we can get our long awaited championship.

excellent post..perfect analysis of what reality would have been in all scenarios,,POTW

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Insanity = what you post.

When a super-raw QB has to think about his footwork, where he is in the pocket, how much time he's been holding the ball, how far the ball is from his body, and probably some throwing mechanics corrections as well, he needs to watch first. You get those things in order first (or at least mostly in order first). Then have him breaking down that week's opponents' tendencies all over the field to allow him to use that knowledge properly without 20 things going off in his mind at the same time.

***

If it all works out in the end it will be a testament to Sanchez himself, because the team really handled him horribly.

You may be 100% correct about Sanchez should have sat (perfect world--competent veteran QB to start and Sanchez to sit), but we have to view the practicalities involved.

The Jets may have just drafted their biggest bust in franchise history in Vernon Gholston in 2008. They got ZERO production out of him. If they sat Sanchez in 2009, then that would mean 2 straight years o zero production from their 1st rounder.

I'm not saying it's right, but just looking at it from Tannenbaum's perspective. He could sell Sanchez sucking in 2009 as a learning experience. He couldn't take 2 years of non production by a 1st rounder and then the potential of Sanchez sucking in 2010 as he's learning on the job.

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Now, you're going into the off-season, presumably with a new offensive coordinator, and we have to hope that Sanchez can 1) restore his own confidence 2) learn a new system 3) Get his knees and body ready to take the beating of an NFL season and 4) Show up to camp ready to regain his teammates' confidence in him. A tall order for a young dude, imo.

The irony in all this is that if you and Sperm had your way in the Jets sitting Sanchez, Brian Schittenheimer would be the OC in 2010.

The only circumstance in which Schitty would not be back is what has transpired thus far.

Remember, Schitty was considered a budding OC star with the 25th ranked offense in 2006. If he would perform up to standard, the Jets would have an offense in the high teens low 20s with a veteran QB and Schitty would be back.

Why would they switch OCs in the offseason with the franchise QB on the bench learning the job and then have him have to learn a whole new playbook at the same time learning game speed?

I really can't see any scenario with Schitty being fired with Sanchez on the bench.

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The irony in all this is that if you and Sperm had your way in the Jets sitting Sanchez, Brian Schittenheimer would be the OC in 2010.

The only circumstance in which Schitty would not be back is what has transpired thus far.

I really can't see any scenario with Schitty being fired with Sanchez on the bench.

true...one step back to take two steps forward philosophy

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Sanchez should have learned from the bench initially. This is not a crazy scenario. And winning the superbowl is not the only reason Jets fans have to follow this team--if that were the case, there would be no Jets fans. If we can make the playoffs--we should. Sacrificing an entire season so a single player can learn his position is an affront to every other hardworking player on this team, every coach who's lost sleep, every fan who's bought a ticket or dedicated four months of Sundays to this organization. Sanchez needed to learn to be an NFL player, learn how to handle his station on an NFL team, how to handle the microscope of the media, criticism, film study and a thousand other things that go along with getting a new job straight out of college. Then he had to go out and play starting QB for the New York Jets--a team who's last QB was Brett Favre. There's a reason teams have minicamps and training camps and study sessions before stepping onto the field. Players must first prepare themselves to succeed. Or should every player just read a playbook and strap on their cleats--after all, learning on the field is the best way, isn't it? Mark Sanchez had/has a ton to learn. By sitting behind a vet, he would have been able to crawl, then walk, then run with this team. As it is he's just stumbling along and tripping the team up alongside him.

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The only QB that didn't start as a rookie this decade was Brady and that was because he was a 6th rd pick and was behind a Pro Bowl QB who had taken his team to a Bowl..Since Sanchez had a limited college career sitting a year may have helped him be better in year 2 but then so does having a years experience playing under fire according to Peyton Manning..

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The only QB that didn't start as a rookie this decade was Brady and that was because he was a 6th rd pick and was behind a Pro Bowl QB who had taken his team to a Bowl..Since Sanchez had a limited college career sitting a year may have helped him be better in year 2 but then so does having a years experience playing under fire according to Peyton Manning..

bottom line, no one knows..its like the draft, a few years from now we will have a idea

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