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New York Jets could opt to cut former first-round pick Vernon Gholston

BY Rich Cimini

DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER

Wednesday, January 27th 2010, 4:00 AM

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New York Jets linebacker Vernon Gholston walks off the field after Gang Green loses to the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday. It may be his last time in a Jets' uniform.

There was a Vernon Gholston sighting in the AFC Championship Game. He was in the final three defensive plays, when the Colts were handing off in garbage time.

It may have been his final hurrah (if you could call it that) in a Jets uniform.

Gholston is one of the most intriguing items on the Jets' offseason agenda. As of now, the organization is truly undecided on whether to bring him back.

Ordinarily, a team never would consider unloading a former first-round pick (sixth overall) this quickly - three years left on his contract - but the prospect of no salary cap under the current CBA means the Jets could cut bait and absorb the large cap hit without having to worry about too much "dead" money.

Do they jump at a rare opportunity or do they give it another year on the off-chance Gholston becomes a contributor? If they opt to cut or trade him, he won't be missed in the locker room.

"I don't see the passion," said one of Gholston's teammates, speaking on the condition of anonymity. "He plays stiff and he just doesn't seem to have that love for the game. I've never seen any emotion at all."

In two seasons, Gholston's bang-for-the-buck ratio is mind boggling. Total income: $11.5 million. Production: 0 sacks.

Rex Ryan made Gholston his pet project, declaring last January, "If he can't do it for me and this team, he's never going to do it." He compared Gholston to the Ravens' Terrell Suggs, one of his former star pupils.

Gholston was Ryan's biggest failing as a first-year head coach, but it wasn't for lack of trying. He hired a pass-rushing consultant, ex-Falcons standout Chuck Smith, who taught Gholston how to use his hands to shed blocks. Ryan gave Gholston an undeserved break, a chance to start the first four games when Calvin Pace was serving a league suspension.

It was no use. Gholston did nothing to distinguish himself and wound up on special teams, saying Monday that he was "fine with that." In the postseason, he played four defensive snaps in three games.

The Jets could've used another pass rusher against the Colts. In an effort to pressure Peyton Manning, they blitzed on 27 of 41 pass plays, unofficially. If they had been able to use a conventional four-man rush, it would've given them another player or two in pass coverage.

That was the Jets' story throughout the season. Even though they finished No. 1 in total defense, they produced only 32 sacks, down from 41 in 2008.

Gholston signed a five-year, $32 million contract that includes $21 million in guarantees, meaning the decision could be based on finances. His cap number for 2010 is $3.5 million, a hefty amount for a special teams player.

Is Gholston concerned about his future?

"No, not really," he said. "That will take place on its own. I'll just try to become the best player I can be."

CLOSER LOOK: S Kerry Rhodes, whose future with the Jets is up in the air, tweeted yesterday that he went for MRI exams on both shoulders, both feet and a knee.

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Jets report card

By MARK CANNIZZARO

QUARTERBACKS

Mark Sanchez had a volatile season to say the least. His final numbers (196-of-364, 53.8-percent, for 2,444 yards, 12 TDs, 20 INTS, 63.0 rating) were proof of that. Fifteen of those INTs came in four games, all losses. Once Sanchez learned to protect the ball, though, the team prospered. While winning seven of their last eight entering the AFC title game, Sanchez was a big part of the Jets' surge. In the playoffs, he was at his best, completing 60.2 percent of his passes with 4 TDs, 2 INTs and a 92.7 rating. Backup Kellen Clemens (13-of-26, 125 yards) did an admirable job managing the one game he started when Sanchez was out with a knee injury.

GRADE: C

RUNNING BACKS

Thomas Jones followed up his '08 season winning the AFC rushing title to run for 1,402 yards and 14 TDs on 331 carries, a 4.5-yard average. But Jones' production waned late in the season due to wear and tear and a bruised knee. In his final seven games, Jones rushed for more than 100 yards only once (Dec. 27 against the Colts) and had a modest total of 451 yards, 5 TDs and a 3.3-yard average. Part of that drop in production, though, had to do with the emergence of rookie Shonn Greene, who finished with 540 yards, 2 TDs and a 5-yard average. In the final seven games, Greene rushed for 532 yards and a 5.5-yard average. FB Tony Richardson is an unsung part of the run blocking that made the Jets the top-ranked rushing offense in the NFL. Leon Washington's season was cut short by a broken leg after he had 331 rushing yards and 15 catches through seven games.

GRADE: A

RECEIVERS

Jerricho Cotchery (57 catches, 821 yards, 3 TDs) was Sanchez' most clutch target, particularly in the playoffs, making five catches for 102 yards in the AFC title game. Braylon Edwards, acquired in mid-season and figuring to be the big-play target the team missed, was hit-and-miss, making too many drops and not enough big plays. He finished with 35 catches, a 15.5-yard average and four TDs. After Cotchery and Edwards, there was a huge fall-off. David Clowney (14-191, 1 TD) never became the deep threat he promised to be. Brad Smith, more of a hybrid player in the "Wildcat" formation, had his best season with more with his legs as an option runner (207 yards and a TD on 18 carries). He caught only seven passes.

GRADE: C

TIGHT ENDS

Dustin Keller (45-522, 2 TDs) became more of a force in the postseason, making TD catches in all three playoff games. Known only as a pass-catching TE, he did improve his blocking. Backup Ben Hartsock, who had one catch for a 2-yard TD, had an awful stretch in midseason with some killer mistakes, including a holding penalty in OT in the home loss to the Bills that negated a play that had put the Jets in chip-shot game-winning FG position. He was, however, an extension of the offensive line as a solid blocker.

GRADE: C-plus

OFFENSIVE LINE

The starting five has played in an NFL-long 36 consecutive games together, including playoffs and dating back to last season. They've become the NFL's best unit in the NFL, helping the Jets lead the NFL in rushing attempts (607) and yards (2,756). They averaged 4.5-yards per carry and had 21 rushing TDs. The big run blockers were Gs Brandon Moore and Alan Faneca as well as C Nick Mangold. Ts D'Brickashaw Ferguson and Damien Woody helped protect Sanchez (26 sacks). Backups Wayne Hunter and Robert Turner were used as extra blocking TEs often and made big contributions in the rushing attack. Faneca, Mangold and Ferguson are all on the Pro Bowl team.

GRADE: A

DEFENSIVE LINE

An unheralded group that was led by DEs Shaun Ellis (56 tackles, 7 for losses and 6

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Analysis: Jets can't rest on laurels

Wednesday, January 27, 2010

BY J.P. PELZMAN

Indianapolis' decision to pull its starters Dec. 27 and pretty much throw away a chance at an unbeaten season has been debated for a month now, and the final verdict on the wisdom of the Colts' controversial choice won't be known until after the Super Bowl.

But there's no question it had a positive effect on the Jets, who took their good fortune and ran with it all the way to the AFC title game and their loss to the Colts in the rematch.

As the Jets head into the off-season, they still need to keep in mind that had it not been for a long kickoff return by Brad Smith

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Rhodes' 'major' announcement

By Rich Cimini

Kerry Rhodes is planning to discuss his future with the Jets during his weekly spot on SNY's "Wheelhouse" show Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. On Tuesday night, SNY was teasing the spot, saying Rhodes is planning a "major" announcement. SNY also said Rhodes has been receiving calls from other teams inquiring about his status.

Technically, that would be a violation of the league's tampering rules -- unless the Jets already have given permission for Rhodes to talk to teams about a trade.

Rhodes' future became a story in late November, when he lost his starting job. He got it back and played well down the stretch (until the AFC Championship Game), but Rex Ryan made it a bigger story by issuing cryptic, non-answers Monday when asked if he expects Rhodes on the team in 2010. Rhodes also was non-committal on Monday.

Choosing to make this so-called "major" announcement on TV will only enhance Rhodes' image as a player consumed with his "Hollywood" image. Frankly, I can't imagine he's going to drop any bombshells. It wouldn't be his nature to go on TV and demand a trade, and I don't think he's going to announce that both sides have agreed to a trade, because that would hurt the Jets' bargaining position with potential suitors.

In the end, I suspect Rhodes will say he wants to remain with the Jets, and that he sees himself as part of the solution, not the problem.

Whether they want him back is another story. If they do, why didn't Ryan just say that on Monday? Isn't it interesting that assistant DB coach Doug Plank, who handled the safeties, was fired on Monday? Maybe that was Rhodes related. Who knows, maybe Rhodes will announce his retirement so he can pursue a career in acting.

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Revisiting the Value of Vinny Testaverde

By TONI MONKOVIC

Vinny Testaverde should be a Hall of Famer?

Feel free to approach the article with skepticism. (I did.) But by the end, you may say, Hmm.

Nice work, Jason Lisk.

Jason Lisk, Pro-Football-Reference.com:

http://www.pro-football-reference.com/blog/?p=5449

Vinny Testaverde has virtually no chance of making the Pro Football Hall of Fame, even though he ranks seventh all-time in passing yards. The common perception of his career is that he was a late bloomer and a compiler who stuck around long enough to put up an occasional good season. He played in only two pro bowls, with the first coming at age 33. He stuck around to throw over 700 passes after turning 40 years old.

I

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New York Jets 2010 Free Agency Limitations and Potential Roster Moves

As the Jets season comes to a close we now turn our attention towards the offseason. The Jets will be in a very different situation this season unless there is a late agreement between the National Football League owners and Players Association to bring back a salary cap before the start of free agency. Most reports have said that the owners are prepared for an uncapped year and that is what they prefer for 2010. While there were early published stories this year talking about the chaos that an uncapped year would bring complete with wild spending and massive player movement, these were stories written with no understanding of how the NFL works and how limited team will be in the offseason. There will be no team more limited than the New York Jets.

The Final Eight Plan is a clause put in the CBA designed to keep the best eight teams from the final capped season from being able to wildly spend and buy a championship in the uncapped year. Because the Jets advanced to the Championship round of the NFL playoffs the Jets are subject to the most severe offseason restrictions placed on teams in an uncapped season. The limitation placed on the team is that they can sign no Unrestricted Free Agents (UFA) in the offseason or make any trades. Here is what the Jets are allowed to do based on how I interpret the CBA (which admittedly may not be 100% correct):

A. The Jets may re-sign any free agent who was under contract to the Jets on the last day of the 2009 season. That means a player such as K Jay Feely, who was on a one year contract with the Jets and is now a free agent, can sign a contract with the Jets.

B. The Jets can sign any free agent who received that status as a result of the NFL Waiver system. What this means is that players who are cut from their current teams are fair game for the Jets. For example a player like QB Chad Pennington, who will be a free agent due to his contract running out, can not be signed by the Jets. However, if a player like Adalius Thomas is cut by the Patriots he can be signed by the team.

C. The Jets may sign or trade for any player to replace a departing free agent provided that the new players first year salary compensation does not exceed the compensation paid to the former player of the team. By compensation the league basically means salary cap number which includes signing bonus prorations, roster bonus, and likely to be earned incentives. The example here is if Jay Feely signs a deal with another team and his first year cap number with the new team is 2 million dollars the Jets may sign any UFA on the market to a contract, of any length, provided that the first year cap number is no higher than 2 million dollars and there is no more than a 30% annual increase in the contract.

D. The Jets are free to negotiate with any Restricted Free Agent. For example a player like WR Steve Breaston of the Arizona Cardinals may be signed by the Jets provided he is tendered by the Cardinals.

E. The Jets are free to negotiate with any Franchise or Transition tag player. What this means is if the Jets want to sign a Julius Peppers who will likely be Franchised they are allowed to, regardless of the salary paid.

Such restrictions put the Jets in an interesting position next year. Typically the Jets like to be active in free agency and like to explore the trade market. These avenues will basically be closed to them in the upcoming year. Because the Jets are limited in how many players that they can sign it is unlikely that some of the season long rumored moves of cutting RB Thomas Jones or trading S Kerry Rhodes will ever happen. The Jets will not have the ability to replace them on the roster if the year is indeed uncapped. We

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PSA: End of Season Presser Scheduled for Thursday

Posted on January 26th, 2010 by Bent

The Jets released the following information earlier today:

New York Jets EVP/General Manager Mike Tannenbaum will be available for an end-of-season press conference on Thursday, January 28 at 2:00 PM. The press conference will be held at the Atlantic Health Jets Training Center.

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Some great stuff right there.

The sad part about VG being cut is that he's probably relieved that he doesnt have to play Football anymore. I will never forgive the Jets for drafting that POS. Everyone and their mother knew this guy was going to be a enormous bust...except Bit.

I love Rex Ryan. His approach to this offseason is outstanding. Love how he's challenging everyone on the team, including himself to find a way to get better. Also, like how he is emphasizing that we are talented enough to get back to the AFC Champ game, but its not a given.

F Keri Rhodes. Seriously, what has he done and who does he think he is to garner this much attention. I hope he's announcing that he wants to be traded. It will be perfect example of how big of a ***** he truly is. He cant hack it in this system because he's such a vagina that he has to leave to some team that will welcome his Diva b.s. and be fine with him playing like a woman affraid to break a nail.

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FTR JiF, I thought the Gholston pick was going to be great...one more reason why 'I' should never run an NFL franchise. It's funny but T0m Shane's assessments of him this past summer were pretty much 100% confirmed by that anonymous Jets' player.

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FTR JiF, I thought the Gholston pick was going to be great...one more reason why 'I' should never run an NFL franchise. It's funny but T0m Shane's assessments of him this past summer were pretty much 100% confirmed by that anonymous Jets' player.

Hey, we all make those mistakes and I've been wrong plenty. In fact, I wanted nothing to do with our very own Mark Sanchez. He was the one guy I wanted nothing to do with in that draft. Gholston was the same. He was the one guy I wanted nothing to do with, and we when we took him, I just knew it wouldnt pan out.

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Hey, we all make those mistakes and I've been wrong plenty. In fact, I wanted nothing to do with our very own Mark Sanchez. He was the one guy I wanted nothing to do with in that draft. Gholston was the same. He was the one guy I wanted nothing to do with, and we when we took him, I just knew it wouldnt pan out.

hell, I was thrilled when we took Mike Nugent

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hell, I was thrilled when we took Mike Nugent

I wanted to gouge Terry Bradway's heart out with a rusty spork.

You gotta be thrilled with this though, right SoFla?

James Dearth- Dearth is one of those holdovers from the Parcells era and certainly good at what he does. His contract has now run out and he will hit free agency in March. The question the Jets have to ask themselves is whether it is worth spending about 1 million on a player who can do nothing but long snap or have that million to spend in free agency once he signs with a new team. You never want to undervalue the LS position, but they may have better used for the money and be able to find someone else that can LS and perhaps also play on the line.
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I wanted to gouge Terry Bradway's heart out with a rusty spork.

You gotta be thrilled with this though, right SoFla?

hey I'm not saying NOTHIN' about James Dearth anymore after he pulled a Jay and Silent Bob on me and showed up here at the house breathing fire out of his nostrils

anybody happen to know what Brad Banta is doing these days?

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Rhodes' 'major' announcement

By Rich Cimini

Kerry Rhodes is planning to discuss his future with the Jets during his weekly spot on SNY's "Wheelhouse" show Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. On Tuesday night, SNY was teasing the spot, saying Rhodes is planning a "major" announcement. SNY also said Rhodes has been receiving calls from other teams inquiring about his status.

Technically, that would be a violation of the league's tampering rules -- unless the Jets already have given permission for Rhodes to talk to teams about a trade.

Rhodes' future became a story in late November, when he lost his starting job. He got it back and played well down the stretch (until the AFC Championship Game), but Rex Ryan made it a bigger story by issuing cryptic, non-answers Monday when asked if he expects Rhodes on the team in 2010. Rhodes also was non-committal on Monday.

Choosing to make this so-called "major" announcement on TV will only enhance Rhodes' image as a player consumed with his "Hollywood" image. Frankly, I can't imagine he's going to drop any bombshells. It wouldn't be his nature to go on TV and demand a trade, and I don't think he's going to announce that both sides have agreed to a trade, because that would hurt the Jets' bargaining position with potential suitors.

In the end, I suspect Rhodes will say he wants to remain with the Jets, and that he sees himself as part of the solution, not the problem.

Whether they want him back is another story. If they do, why didn't Ryan just say that on Monday? Isn't it interesting that assistant DB coach Doug Plank, who handled the safeties, was fired on Monday? Maybe that was Rhodes related. Who knows, maybe Rhodes will announce his retirement so he can pursue a career in acting.

30 minutes from the SuperBowl... and this dipsh!t wants to leave. :rolleyes:

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The last two paragraphs are interesting. More money in the Jets pockets this year, but lots of incentive for the league's lesser franchises and players to get a new CBA ASAP.

New salary-cap rules would punish Jets for success

January 26, 2010 By BOB GLAUBER

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The Jets' unexpected run to the AFC Championship Game made the 2009 season a rousing success. But there might be a penalty for their achievement.

If, as expected, the NFL goes into the 2010 season with no salary cap, the Jets will be limited in their ability to sign unrestricted free agents during the offseason.

It's one of several changes that would go into effect if the NFL and its players union do not extend the current collective-bargaining agreement. Executives from both camps have indicated in recent weeks that it is highly unlikely an extension will be reached, meaning the following rules would go into effect:

The eight teams that made the divisional playoffs - including the Jets - would have limits placed on their ability to sign unrestricted free agents. They couldn't sign them until they lost their own unrestricted free agents. And even then, they could only sign free agents to deals equal to or less than those signed by the players they lost. (The Giants would not be restricted because they didn't make the playoffs.)

There is one important stipulation about free agents: According to a league source with knowledge of the uncapped year's rules, any team, including the final eight playoff clubs, can sign a player who is released and becomes a free agent. The restriction comes into play only for unrestricted free agents whose contracts have expired.

Unrestricted free agency moves from four years of accrued experience to six. Because of that rule, such notable players as Jets receiver Braylon Edwards and running back/kick returner Leon Washington; Broncos linebacker Elvis Dumervil and receiver Brandon Marshall, and Texans linebacker DeMeco Ryans would become restricted free agents because they have not completed six NFL seasons. Their teams could tender contracts to protect them from being signed by other clubs.

There would be no limit on how much teams can spend on salaries, and no minimum, either. When a salary cap is in effect, teams must adhere to a maximum and a minimum. In 2009, the cap was $128 million per team. The floor was $111 million, meaning even lower-paying teams still had to spend a minimum. It is expected that many traditionally frugal teams will lower salaries, some of them drastically, next season.

Two players per team would be eligible to receive a "transition tag." A transition player must be offered at least the average of the top 10 salaries for his position during the previous season, or 120 percent of his salary the previous year, whichever is greater.

The NFL would eliminate a supplemental revenue-sharing plan. The program, valued between $100 million and $200 million, involves the top 15 revenue-producing teams placing money into a pool from which the lower-income clubs can draw. Nine franchises qualified to receive the funds last year, according to the league.

The 32 teams no longer would be obligated to fund many player-benefit programs, including 401k, player annuity, severance pay and tuition assistance. The reduction could reach more than $7 million per team.

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New York Jets 2010 Free Agency Limitations and Potential Roster Moves

As the Jets season comes to a close we now turn our attention towards the offseason. The Jets will be in a very different situation this season unless there is a late agreement between the National Football League owners and Players Association to bring back a salary cap before the start of free agency. Most reports have said that the owners are prepared for an uncapped year and that is what they prefer for 2010. While there were early published stories this year talking about the chaos that an uncapped year would bring complete with wild spending and massive player movement, these were stories written with no understanding of how the NFL works and how limited team will be in the offseason. There will be no team more limited than the New York Jets.

The Final Eight Plan is a clause put in the CBA designed to keep the best eight teams from the final capped season from being able to wildly spend and buy a championship in the uncapped year. Because the Jets advanced to the Championship round of the NFL playoffs the Jets are subject to the most severe offseason restrictions placed on teams in an uncapped season. The limitation placed on the team is that they can sign no Unrestricted Free Agents (UFA) in the offseason or make any trades. Here is what the Jets are allowed to do based on how I interpret the CBA (which admittedly may not be 100% correct):

A. The Jets may re-sign any free agent who was under contract to the Jets on the last day of the 2009 season. That means a player such as K Jay Feely, who was on a one year contract with the Jets and is now a free agent, can sign a contract with the Jets.

B. The Jets can sign any free agent who received that status as a result of the NFL Waiver system. What this means is that players who are cut from their current teams are fair game for the Jets. For example a player like QB Chad Pennington, who will be a free agent due to his contract running out, can not be signed by the Jets. However, if a player like Adalius Thomas is cut by the Patriots he can be signed by the team.

C. The Jets may sign or trade for any player to replace a departing free agent provided that the new players first year salary compensation does not exceed the compensation paid to the former player of the team. By compensation the league basically means salary cap number which includes signing bonus prorations, roster bonus, and likely to be earned incentives. The example here is if Jay Feely signs a deal with another team and his first year cap number with the new team is 2 million dollars the Jets may sign any UFA on the market to a contract, of any length, provided that the first year cap number is no higher than 2 million dollars and there is no more than a 30% annual increase in the contract.

D. The Jets are free to negotiate with any Restricted Free Agent. For example a player like WR Steve Breaston of the Arizona Cardinals may be signed by the Jets provided he is tendered by the Cardinals.

E. The Jets are free to negotiate with any Franchise or Transition tag player. What this means is if the Jets want to sign a Julius Peppers who will likely be Franchised they are allowed to, regardless of the salary paid.

Such restrictions put the Jets in an interesting position next year. Typically the Jets like to be active in free agency and like to explore the trade market. These avenues will basically be closed to them in the upcoming year. Because the Jets are limited in how many players that they can sign it is unlikely that some of the season long rumored moves of cutting RB Thomas Jones or trading S Kerry Rhodes will ever happen. The Jets will not have the ability to replace them on the roster if the year is indeed uncapped. We

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Jets' league-leading backfield could face changes

January 26, 2010 By RODERICK BOONE

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There are a few tough decisions facing general manager Mike Tannenbaum as he attempts to tweak the Jets' roster, setting things up for another potential postseason run next season.

Perhaps the biggest question of all: What does he do with their crowded backfield?

The Jets' ground game was easily tops in the NFL, amassing 2,756 yards. At 31, Thomas Jones had a lot to do with that, with 1,402 hard yards and 14 touchdowns, both career highs. Jones silenced the critics who thought he was done, putting together a midseason surge during which he topped triple digits five times in a seven-game span, which included a career-best and franchise-high 210 yards against the Bills on Oct. 18.

However, Jones got worn down a bit at the end of the season after a career-high 331 carries and serving as a battering ram at times. Rex Ryan began resting him on Wednesdays during the stretch run, hoping it would keep his legs fresh and allow a bruised knee to heal. But it didn't do much to revive Jones, who mustered only 117 yards on 45 attempts in the postseason, averaging only 2.6 yards.

After making a base salary of $900,000 this season, Jones is due a $3-million roster bonus in March and has a base salary of $2.8 million. That's nearly $6 million for someone who'll be 32 by the 2010 opener. With the emergence of rookie Shonn Greene during the season-ending run, Jones could be expendable because he probably won't be the featured back. And who knows if he'd consider a lesser role?

Still, his status in the locker room could keep him around. Greene emulates everything Jones does, constantly picking his brain. Jones is also extremely close with fullback Tony Richardson and Leon Washington. The three are like brothers and spend a lot of time together, so letting Jones go and banishing him from teammates who want him back might not be as easy as it appears.

Greene had more rushing yards than anyone this postseason, gaining 304 with two touchdowns on 54 carries. Keep in mind he rushed 108 times for 540 yards and two touchdowns in the regular season.

He hits the hole much more quickly than Jones and has the ankle-breaking moves to leave defenders in the dust. Greene averaged 5 yards a carry in the regular season but also isn't without his faults. He fumbled three times, losing each.

Plus, Greene was hurt frequently in his first pro season, beginning in training camp in Cortland, when he showed flashes of brilliance in the Jets' Green & White scrimmage but had to leave with an ankle injury. He battled bruised ribs in the preseason and against the Colts on Sunday, sitting out most of the second half.

With that in mind, is he really ready to shoulder the load?

As for Washington, who will be a restricted free agent under the current collective-bargaining agreement, he expects to be 100-percent healthy by the time the season rolls around. The Jets missed Washington's big-play ability and versatility when he sat out the final 12 games with a broken right fibula. He said he thinks a three-headed monster in the backfield would work and remained open to the idea.

But we'll have to see if he can return to his shifty self.

We didn't even mention the other Washington on the roster. Who knows what the Jets think of second-year man Chauncey Washington, Mark Sanchez's former USC teammate whom the Jets picked up off Dallas' practice squad Dec. 15.

So the Jets have some difficult choices to make, and there's a good chance the league's top-ranked backfield might not look the same come September.

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So if I understand this correct, if the Jets let Kellen Clemens sign somewhere else, then they can sign another QB as long as the contract is equal, or less than, the contract Clemens gets in the first year?

And this same scenario applies to each player that leaves?

So in order for us to sign a free agent safety, we have to have a safety leave?

In order for us to sign a free agent CB, we have to have a CB leave?

Hmm... I hope I am totally misunderstanding this.

It does not have to be a player at the same position. If the Jets want to sign any UFA, they must lose a UFA with at least an equivalent contract value to the one they are signing. So if Clemens gets $1 million to play somewhere, the Jets can then go and sign any UFA for a contract up to $1 million.

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So if I understand this correct, if the Jets let Kellen Clemens sign somewhere else, then they can sign another QB as long as the contract is equal, or less than, the contract Clemens gets in the first year?

And this same scenario applies to each player that leaves?

So in order for us to sign a free agent safety, we have to have a safety leave?

In order for us to sign a free agent CB, we have to have a CB leave?

Hmm... I hope I am totally misunderstanding this.

You are.

If the Jets lose Kellen for $1M a year, they can sign any FA at any position for up to $1M a year.

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So if I understand this correct, if the Jets let Kellen Clemens sign somewhere else, then they can sign another QB as long as the contract is equal, or less than, the contract Clemens gets in the first year?

And this same scenario applies to each player that leaves?

So in order for us to sign a free agent safety, we have to have a safety leave?

In order for us to sign a free agent CB, we have to have a CB leave?

Hmm... I hope I am totally misunderstanding this.

I'm pretty sure you are. I don't think position has anything to do with it. You get the money that the player got to use on another FA. I'm hoping the Jets let him go and go with the three QBs on roster. I'm sick of carrying 4 QBs. Best case tender him and get some late pick back.

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It does not have to be a player at the same position. If the Jets want to sign any UFA, they must lose a UFA with at least an equivalent contract value to the one they are signing. So if Clemens gets $1 million to play somewhere, the Jets can then go and sign any UFA for a contract up to $1 million.

Ahh.... good. That makes much more sense.

How are signing bonuses affected in this whole paradigm? Let's say we want to sign Nick Collins. If Clemens gets a deal of $1M to be the backup somewhere, then we give Nick Collins $1M. However, this would be too little to get him... so could we offer him a $5M signing bonus? In addition, could we back-load the contract so it escalates in later years?

Basically, burying his 1st year salary in a bonus... while his contract is peanuts?

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I'm glad it's a decision that I don't have to make...on Jones that is...my gut tells me he should stay as a leader in the LR but who knows, maybe someone will want to trade for him

I think we keep him. I would love to see us stop carrying 4 QBs and start carrying 4 RBs... 175 carries for Jones, 200 carries for Greene, 100 for Leon, 75 for the guy that will step in for Jones in 2011.

Ground and pound.

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Ahh.... good. That makes much more sense.

How are signing bonuses affected in this whole paradigm? Let's say we want to sign Nick Collins. If Clemens gets a deal of $1M to be the backup somewhere, then we give Nick Collins $1M. However, this would be too little to get him... so could we offer him a $5M signing bonus? In addition, could we back-load the contract so it escalates in later years?

Basically, burying his 1st year salary in a bonus... while his contract is peanuts?

There's two issues with that, the first being that I'm pretty sure that its based on the salary cap number for that year, so the $1 million would also have to include that year's portion of the hit for the bonus given. The other issue is that in order to avoid the back-loading issue they've implemented an incremental cap that a player's contract can only increase by so much each year (I believe the number is 30%). Its possible a guy like Tannenbaum could work something out (I'm not sure how things like roster bonuses play into these restrictions), but there's a lot of guidelines out there which make it difficult.

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I think we keep him. I would love to see us stop carrying 4 QBs and start carrying 4 RBs... 175 carries for Jones, 200 carries for Greene, 100 for Leon, 75 for the guy that will step in for Jones in 2011.

Ground and pound.

Gotta get rid of the 4th QB. That's a no brainer.

I'd like to see the Jets cut Jones and bring him back at a reduced rate. If Washington comes back healthy next year, then Jones moves to #3 RB. I'd see him more in the 100 carry range, with Greene getting 250-300 carries. Jones would be a great insurance policy, and might be able to be a force in next year's playoffs (FSM willing) if he's got a light load during the regular season.

I'd like to see the Jets bring in and utilize a more versatile FB. Be great to have one who could get a few carries and catch a bunch of passes. A guy who'd be the ideal lone setback on obvious passing downs. A guy who could pick up blitzers, and be a legitimate threat as a safety valve.

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I think Sanchez and O'Connell will be 2 of the QB's next season. Clemens is gone and there seems to always be some hidden thing about Ainge keeping him so low on the depth chart. Whatever that is, they need to address it once and for all-either keep him as the #3 or let him go.

I wonder if they'll try and use Woodhead in the slot by working with Sanchez, Braylon, J-Co and Keller in the off season like Mark said to the guys that he's going to do this year.

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Just out of Curiosity, Since we finished 4th and the top 8 teams can only sign players equal to the value of players we lose , and since Gholston is gauranteed 21 million ,does that mean we can sign 1 player whose worth up to 21 million as a free agent , cause if Mr. T. swings this so we can get the value we are paying Ghoulston Mr. T. is Mr. GM......

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Just out of Curiosity, Since we finished 4th and the top 8 teams can only sign players equal to the value of players we lose , and since Gholston is gauranteed 21 million ,does that mean we can sign 1 player whose worth up to 21 million as a free agent , cause if Mr. T. swings this so we can get the value we are paying Ghoulston Mr. T. is Mr. GM......

Unfortunately no, for two reasons. #1, in this case the Jets would have to cut Gholston, and released players do not count towards this calculation and #2, even if Gholston would count, the value of the player is determined based on the first year of their contract with their new team, not the one from their prior team.

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