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Where did you go to College?


PS17
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Funny you mention that. I just got back from a college fair a while ago. All I know is that I want to do something engineering-related. Stanford or MIT would be ideal, but Holy Cross or other schools work for me.

Good luck with that man, wish I didn't get a degree in Arts and Crafts err Communications like I did.

For me, University of Tampa.

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Iona College...drafted because dumb me was taking only 10 credit hours and needed 12 for a deferment. Graduated from the University of South Vietnam...instead of a diploma, they gave me a Purple Heart and some other pieces of jewelry that won't buy me a cup of coffee. Have to say though, my Purple Heart license plate does get me out of traffic citations...always.

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Iona College...drafted because dumb me was taking only 10 credit hours and needed 12 for a deferment. Graduated from the University of South Vietnam...instead of a diploma, they gave me a Purple Heart and some other pieces of jewelry that won't buy me a cup of coffee. Have to say though, my Purple Heart license plate does get me out of traffic citations...always.

In life experience that is worth way more than a college degree to put things in perspective in life.

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Iona College...drafted because dumb me was taking only 10 credit hours and needed 12 for a deferment. Graduated from the University of South Vietnam...instead of a diploma, they gave me a Purple Heart and some other pieces of jewelry that won't buy me a cup of coffee. Have to say though, my Purple Heart license plate does get me out of traffic citations...always.

:cheers: The Purple Heart will never go out of style Bill!

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Funny you mention that. I just got back from a college fair a while ago. All I know is that I want to do something engineering-related. Stanford or MIT would be ideal, but Holy Cross or other schools work for me.

You know, if you dig small catholic schools like Holy Cross, there is one outside of Philadelphia that has a GREAT engineering program... PM me for more info ;-)

Oh and this school has a national champion football team & pretty awesome basketball too.

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I used to live about a mile away from Holy Cross. Used to watch the Worcester Tornadoes play right next to their campus. And they are one of my backup plans if I can't make Division 1 football.

Holy Cross IS division 1 football. Do I need to start an "FCS football IS DIVISION I FOOTBALL (except when Georgetown does it)" thread?

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Funny you mention that. I just got back from a college fair a while ago. All I know is that I want to do something engineering-related. Stanford or MIT would be ideal, but Holy Cross or other schools work for me.

If you 99% plan on Post-Grad, then go to Holy Cross or 'other schools' for Undergrad, and save Stanford and MIT for your Post Grad degree.

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If you 99% plan on Post-Grad, then go to Holy Cross or 'other schools' for Undergrad, and save Stanford and MIT for your Post Grad degree.

If it's a profession that requires post-grad before going out into the workforce (ie. law or medical), then I would agree.

In engineering, it completely depends on what you're looking to do. If you want to be an egghead and go the research/PhD/professor route, then I would agree that the school you choose for undergrad is not as important.

However, if you intend on being a practicing engineer working for a company, I would go to a better school for undergrad and try to get your foot in the door somewhere as an intern, if possible. Then, after graduating, look for a full-time position, as many companies will pay for you to go back to school. The bonus is that as long as the course can be justified as being directly related to your current job function, that money is not taxable as income. This route saved me quite a bit of money, as my company covered up to 18 credits of post-grad per calendar year.

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If it's a profession that requires post-grad before going out into the workforce (ie. law or medical), then I would agree.

In engineering, it completely depends on what you're looking to do. If you want to be an egghead and go the research/PhD/professor route, then I would agree that the school you choose for undergrad is not as important.

However, if you intend on being a practicing engineer working for a company, I would go to a better school for undergrad and try to get your foot in the door somewhere as an intern, if possible. Then, after graduating, look for a full-time position, as many companies will pay for you to go back to school. The bonus is that as long as the course can be justified as being directly related to your current job function, that money is not taxable as income. This route saved me quite a bit of money, as my company covered up to 18 credits of post-grad per calendar year.

A buddy of mine went to Laffayette for engineering, and right out the gate(no post-grad) kids making probably 4x I am working on the new World Trade Center.

But that might be a case of who he knew not what he knew. Not to

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If it's a profession that requires post-grad before going out into the workforce (ie. law or medical), then I would agree.

In engineering, it completely depends on what you're looking to do. If you want to be an egghead and go the research/PhD/professor route, then I would agree that the school you choose for undergrad is not as important.

However, if you intend on being a practicing engineer working for a company, I would go to a better school for undergrad and try to get your foot in the door somewhere as an intern, if possible. Then, after graduating, look for a full-time position, as many companies will pay for you to go back to school. The bonus is that as long as the course can be justified as being directly related to your current job function, that money is not taxable as income. This route saved me quite a bit of money, as my company covered up to 18 credits of post-grad per calendar year.

i think i said that,,haha

if u only want undergrad, go to better school,,if u want post grad, save the better school for post grad..just go to a school at undergrad level that got a decent enough rep to get you into the elite post grad..

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Old Dominion University. Graduated in '99 and OXSCOTT on here is my "Little bro" in our fraternity.

Many, many hot ladies in the Virginia Beach area.

Great Times.

I was a sailor in the late '80s and friends I made at ODU were my weekend "escape". It's really too bad they demolished Friar Tucks. Drove by last year and found out it was gone.

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i think i said that,,haha

if u only want undergrad, go to better school,,if u want post grad, save the better school for post grad..just go to a school at undergrad level that got a decent enough rep to get you into the elite post grad..

My response was specific to him considering Engineering... he'll probably be one of those propeller-heads that winds up never leaving school for the real world, so your advice is certainly sound.

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