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Jets closing in on deal with All-Pro center Nick Mangold


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Cimini:

Chances are, Mangold accepted a deal with "rolling" guarantees, a la Ferguson. Revis wants no part of that kind of deal; he wants fully guaranteed money (i.e. a huge signing bonus). It's his right to ask for that, but his leverage is diminishing. Remember, he has three years left on his contract, so there's no sense of urgency for the Jets.

You know when there's a sense of urgency? If the defense gets torched by the Baltimore Ravens on opening night, that's when the leverage shifts to Revis. Is he willing to hold out that long? Is he willing to take that chance? He might have to because, barring an injury at cornerback, the Jets are showing no signs of buckling.

In the spring, the Jets were accused of being cheap, strapped for cash because of lagging PSL sales. That, some media types theorized, was holding up the deals for the "Core Four." (The fourth is David Harris, who is entering the final year of his rookie deal.) At the time, the Jets were saying they had budgeted enough money to sign all four to new deals. Not many believed them, but now they've taken care of Ferguson and Mangold.

If it were just one, you could call it a fluke. But two? Those players were willing to take the Jets' money. Why not Revis?

The structure of the deal is going to be interesting. Brick got a small amount of money upfront, and doesn't get any of his "guarantees" until the 2011 season begins. Like Rich says here, Revis wants some actual guarantees, and these fancy new contracts that Tannenbaum is putting together probably aren't going to get the job done.

Nick had about $3.65M coming this season, and so with the 30% rule they could get to $4.7 in the second year, $6.1M in the third, $7.9M in the fourth, $10.2M in the fifth, etc. Not too tricky.

Revis only had $550K coming this year, which makes that 30% rule much more difficult to operate around without a large bonus. Especially when Revis is worth more per year than Mangold.

We'll see what Mangold got upfront, but if it is like Brick's deal, the Jets can still fairly be called cheap here.

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In all honesty I wanted Brick and Mangold to get done before Revis and Harris. This is great news and hopefully sends the message that we will work with players who work with us (go to offseason workouts, mini camps, training camp). Two good soldiers down, 1 ******* to go.

Harris has to wait. The 30% rule screws him over.

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Cimini:

The structure of the deal is going to be interesting. Brick got a small amount of money upfront, and doesn't get any of his "guarantees" until the 2011 season begins. Like Rich says here, Revis wants some actual guarantees, and these fancy new contracts that Tannenbaum is putting together probably aren't going to get the job done.

Nick had about $3.65M coming this season, and so with the 30% rule they could get to $4.7 in the second year, $6.1M in the third, $7.9M in the fourth, $10.2M in the fifth, etc. Not too tricky.

Revis only had $550K coming this year, which makes that 30% rule much more difficult to operate around without a large bonus. Especially when Revis is worth more per year than Mangold.

We'll see what Mangold got upfront, but if it is like Brick's deal, the Jets can still fairly be called cheap here.

This is confusing. So basically they can only up his measly salary by 30% per year? That's going to require a huge bonus! But you can't spread a bonus around over years can you? If not that could be a disastrous move for the Jets... you give him this huge bonus upfront, what if he gets injured? You're out about 90% of his HUGE contract?

I wouldn't call them cheap for not doing THAT

The other thing that freaks me out about that is let's say there's football in 2011. Now he's got his huge bonus, but now he's going to bitch and moan about his petty salary so you're looking at yet another hold out? UGH

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This is confusing. So basically they can only up his measly salary by 30% per year? That's going to require a huge bonus! But you can't spread a bonus around over years can you? If not that could be a disastrous move for the Jets... you give him this huge bonus upfront, what if he gets injured? You're out about 90% of his HUGE contract?

I wouldn't call them cheap for not doing THAT

The other thing that freaks me out about that is let's say there's football in 2011. Now he's got his huge bonus, but now he's going to bitch and moan about his petty salary so you're looking at yet another hold out? UGH

It is confusing, and I'm not going to pretend that I know all the particulars - because I don't.

Revis has earned the incentives that would pay him $5M in 2011 and $15M in 2012. If they can somehow work that semi-existing deal into an extension, it makes it a lot easier - but I don't know if that's possible.

I'm sure the Jets want to keep that bonus money low to protect themselves - as they should. Not as low as Brick's, but nothing exceeding the average annual salary of the deal I would think.

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It is confusing, and I'm not going to pretend that I know all the particulars - because I don't.

Revis has earned the incentives that would pay him $5M in 2011 and $15M in 2012. If they can somehow work that semi-existing deal into an extension, it makes it a lot easier - but I don't know if that's possible.

I'm sure the Jets want to keep that bonus money low to protect themselves - as they should. Not as low as Brick's, but nothing exceeding the average annual salary of the deal I would think.

I think this is great, now get a deal with Harris done...tons of pressure on Revis now

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Cimini:

The structure of the deal is going to be interesting. Brick got a small amount of money upfront, and doesn't get any of his "guarantees" until the 2011 season begins. Like Rich says here, Revis wants some actual guarantees, and these fancy new contracts that Tannenbaum is putting together probably aren't going to get the job done.

Nick had about $3.65M coming this season, and so with the 30% rule they could get to $4.7 in the second year, $6.1M in the third, $7.9M in the fourth, $10.2M in the fifth, etc. Not too tricky.

Revis only had $550K coming this year, which makes that 30% rule much more difficult to operate around without a large bonus. Especially when Revis is worth more per year than Mangold.

We'll see what Mangold got upfront, but if it is like Brick's deal, the Jets can still fairly be called cheap here.

Really? Based on what? Sorry, but you are completely wrong on this one, even if the deals are structured the same way. You want to know why, if it wasn't for agreeing to do those deals, neither Brick or Mangold would have gotten anything this year. They would have been negotiating extensions next offseason, and it has nothing to do with cheapness and everything to do with the CBA. But now, rather than having to worry about negotiating a new deal next year, they already have their new deal set in place ready to kick in, guarantees and all, as soon as next year comes along. Considering that neither of these guys were going to hold out like that little sh*t Revis anyway, and that Brick (and assuming Mangold will too) got a raise for this year, how is this anything but a win for those guys? Don't mistake players not having the kind of insatiable greed that Revis has for the Jets being cheap. It's not a coincidence that two of the Jets most important players on offense found these deals acceptable and so far there's only been one guy who's been so disgustingly insulted by it all. That's not on the Jets.

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The structure of the deal is going to be interesting. Brick got a small amount of money upfront, and doesn't get any of his "guarantees" until the 2011 season begins. Like Rich says here, Revis wants some actual guarantees, and these fancy new contracts that Tannenbaum is putting together probably aren't going to get the job done.

Nick had about $3.65M coming this season, and so with the 30% rule they could get to $4.7 in the second year, $6.1M in the third, $7.9M in the fourth, $10.2M in the fifth, etc. Not too tricky.

Revis only had $550K coming this year, which makes that 30% rule much more difficult to operate around without a large bonus. Especially when Revis is worth more per year than Mangold.

We'll see what Mangold got upfront, but if it is like Brick's deal, the Jets can still fairly be called cheap here.

Incorrect. The 30% rule is based on the player's compensation for the last capped season, which was 2009.

For calculations under the 30% rule, Revis's comp number last year was at least $6.16m, thanks in large part to a $5.7m roster bonus (on top of of his $460k salary). There was an additional $550k in other bonuses, but I'm not sure of the nature of that bonus or how it is classified. Given that his first year's salary under the deal could be $8+ million, this rule is not a major hurdle in finalizing a deal for him, especially when you consider that "not likely to be reached" incentives (that can be based on easily attainable statistical milestones) needn't comply with the 30% annual increases.

Deals for Mangold and Harris, on the other hand, will likely require some creativity in lieu of forking over a huge upfront signing bonus to bring up the total comp.

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Revis only had $550K coming this year, which makes that 30% rule much more difficult to operate around without a large bonus. Especially when Revis is worth more per year than Mangold.

Incorrect. The 30% rule is based on the player's compensation for the last capped season, which was 2009.

For calculations under the 30% rule, Revis's comp number last year was at least $6.16m, thanks in large part to a $5.7m roster bonus (on top of of his $460k salary). There was an additional $550k in other bonuses, but I'm not sure of the nature of that bonus or how it is classified. Given that his first year's salary under the deal could be $8+ million, this rule is not a major hurdle in finalizing a deal for him, especially when you consider that "not likely to be reached" incentives (that can be based on easily attainable statistical milestones) needn't comply with the 30% annual increases.

LOL. Slats is full of FAIL on the Revis contract discussion. :D

If there is a deal for Revis like rumored, then Revis came down from his $16 mill per demand. That was the No. 1 issue. Injury stuff and guarantees were tangental. National Football Post published last week that Team Revis saw Revis on par with Brady, Peyton, and Brees and thus his new contract should be in that ballpark.

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Really? Based on what? Sorry, but you are completely wrong on this one, even if the deals are structured the same way. You want to know why, if it wasn't for agreeing to do those deals, neither Brick or Mangold would have gotten anything this year. They would have been negotiating extensions next offseason, and it has nothing to do with cheapness and everything to do with the CBA. But now, rather than having to worry about negotiating a new deal next year, they already have their new deal set in place ready to kick in, guarantees and all, as soon as next year comes along. Considering that neither of these guys were going to hold out like that little sh*t Revis anyway, and that Brick (and assuming Mangold will too) got a raise for this year, how is this anything but a win for those guys? Don't mistake players not having the kind of insatiable greed that Revis has for the Jets being cheap. It's not a coincidence that two of the Jets most important players on offense found these deals acceptable and so far there's only been one guy who's been so disgustingly insulted by it all. That's not on the Jets.

If Brick suffers a career ending injury this year, he has no contract next year. Just whatever insurance he pays out of pocket.

Woody's preparing to lock these players out. Contracts were never put together like this before. I can't believe how many fans think that's just Jim Dandy. Don't want to hear any bitching from you next year when the owners shut down football.

Incorrect. The 30% rule is based on the player's compensation for the last capped season, which was 2009.

For calculations under the 30% rule, Revis's comp number last year was at least $6.16m, thanks in large part to a $5.7m roster bonus (on top of of his $460k salary). There was an additional $550k in other bonuses, but I'm not sure of the nature of that bonus or how it is classified. Given that his first year's salary under the deal could be $8+ million, this rule is not a major hurdle in finalizing a deal for him, especially when you consider that "not likely to be reached" incentives (that can be based on easily attainable statistical milestones) needn't comply with the 30% annual increases.

Deals for Mangold and Harris, on the other hand, will likely require some creativity in lieu of forking over a huge upfront signing bonus to bring up the total comp.

You're correct. I thought of this when I got out of bed today, but you beat me by an hour. tongue.gif

I'm sure it will be done by Wednesday.

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If Brick suffers a career ending injury this year, he has no contract next year. Just whatever insurance he pays out of pocket.

Woody's preparing to lock these players out. Contracts were never put together like this before. I can't believe how many fans think that's just Jim Dandy. Don't want to hear any bitching from you next year when the owners shut down football.

Again, Brick doesn't get a new deal this year if he doesn't agree to those terms, so it's absolutely no different than the contract he was going to already play under except he's already getting more money this year and the new contract he would've been getting next year is already in place. How is that a bad thing for him? Contracts were never put together like this before because these rules under the new CBA never existed before, I'm not sure what's so difficult to understand about that.

The owners won't be shutting down anything, this idea of a lockout is a farce, if anything the owners are in a good position if there is no new CBA given the rights they will be able to exercise. If anything, once that happens it could be the players who could potentially be striking, which is just another reason teams are hesitant to give out big signing bonuses right now. Just like the Jets issue will be with Revis going forward, the owners need to make sure all players have proper incentive to show up for work as opposed to not.

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If Brick suffers a career ending injury this year, he has no contract next year. Just whatever insurance he pays out of pocket.

Brick got an extension, not a new contract. He still has to play under the terms of his initial deal. What he got was a new deal beyond that, but he still has to finish out this year to get it.

The Jets seem pretty adamant about players playing out the terms of the contracts they were given before a boatload of new money is put in the players' pockets. Revis isn't the first player to take bonus money and call it a thing of the past. The Jets have seen him do this, and others as well, and going forward seem to be more in line with the idea of paying guarantees only if the player shows up to play. None of this "You paid me that money x-years ago and it doesn't count anymore" garbage.

Brick had 2 years left on his contract. Over the last 2 years the Jets have given him more this year, and then $35M in guarantees starting next year. To categorize that as the Jets awarding Ferguson with nothing meaningful is just taking the player-advocate POV to an extreme. At some point you have to accept that the player is locked into the contract and the player isn't. If that's too awful for the players then they can go play in the CFL. If you as a fan think it's too unjust, then go buy a team with hundreds of millions of dollars you've scraped together and then pay all your players guaranteed contracts whether they play or not.

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Again, Brick doesn't get a new deal this year if he doesn't agree to those terms, so it's absolutely no different than the contract he was going to already play under except he's already getting more money this year and the new contract he would've been getting next year is already in place. How is that a bad thing for him? Contracts were never put together like this before because these rules under the new CBA never existed before, I'm not sure what's so difficult to understand about that.

I understand the CBA rules. There's nothing in there that prevents bonuses from being paid out. If anything, it makes it easier to pay out bonuses that may not be charged against future caps. The rules make it impossible to guarantee future years. I get that. But they should actually be encouraging owners to hand out extra money this year. Instead, the owners seem to be collectively doing the opposite.

I also understand perfectly why D'Brick signed the deal he did, and why Revis or Mangold shouldn't sign a similar contract.

For Mangold, he's in his contract year. He should tell them to pay up or they can bid for his services on the open market the next time it opens.

For Revis, his injury concerns are greater than that of an offensive lineman. Brick or Mangold could lose a step and still be at the top of their profession. If Revis suffers a loss of that same half a step, he could go from GOAT to average. That's why he's holding out for real guarantees.

The owners won't be shutting down anything, this idea of a lockout is a farce, if anything the owners are in a good position if there is no new CBA given the rights they will be able to exercise. If anything, once that happens it could be the players who could potentially be striking, which is just another reason teams are hesitant to give out big signing bonuses right now. Just like the Jets issue will be with Revis going forward, the owners need to make sure all players have proper incentive to show up for work as opposed to not.

I hope you're right, but again, I don't think you are. There's been no strike talk from the union, plenty of lockout talk from the management side. This year is written into the current CBA as the final year. Until a new agreement is reaches, there is no deal in place next year. So they either have to come to terms on a new contract, or both sides have to agree to continue playing under the existing rules of this year.

Despite having the richest league in the country, and the most favorable labor agreement of the major sports, the NFL owners want more. They want the longer season and a rookie cap, and they'll press a reduction in the overall cap to get what the want. Watch.

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If Brick suffers a career ending injury this year, he has no contract next year. Just whatever insurance he pays out of pocket.

Woody's preparing to lock these players out. Contracts were never put together like this before. I can't believe how many fans think that's just Jim Dandy. Don't want to hear any bitching from you next year when the owners shut down football.

Everybody knows that there is a strong possibility that there won't be football in 2011 if they've been paying attention.

Contracts are being put together like this because of the current rules in place. Other players have signed similar contracts.

Also, the odds of Brick suffering a career ending injury is infinitesimally in 2010 or any other year. Leon, a RB, had a compound fracture of his leg and is back playing in less than a year. If he signed a DBrick deal he'd get all his money.

The injury argument is incredibly bogus. Skill is the most important guarantee because it means you get your full guarantee if you're cut after passing a physical. Players are cut for skill way more than they ever are for injury.

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If there is a deal for Revis like rumored, then Revis came down from his $16 mill per demand. That was the No. 1 issue. Injury stuff and guarantees were tangental. National Football Post published last week that Team Revis saw Revis on par with Brady, Peyton, and Brees and thus his new contract should be in that ballpark.

Here you go DireJet, next time you take your head out of your a$$, read this!

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LOL. Slats is full of FAIL on the Revis contract discussion. :D

If there is a deal for Revis like rumored, then Revis came down from his $16 mill per demand. That was the No. 1 issue. Injury stuff and guarantees were tangental. National Football Post published last week that Team Revis saw Revis on par with Brady, Peyton, and Brees and thus his new contract should be in that ballpark.

IF that is true, he will sit out the year and force a trade

I pray to god it is not true

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IF that is true, he will sit out the year and force a trade

I pray to god it is not true

Doesnt matter what he wants if that is true... Because if it is true and he really is that stubbrn, he's already played his last down in the NFL for quite some time. Nobody is paying Revis Brees, Brady, or Peyton numbers on a long term deal.

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