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A Bit Of A Late Night Rant On Workers


RutgersJetFan

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(Warning, sentimental rant ahead)

I've been working for years busting my a$$ pursuing a dream career that's involved never ending schooling, and sometimes I forget how lucky I am to come from and have a family that's been able to support me through all of it financially while I pursued a dream. During that time, I've held side jobs in restaurants, busting my a$$ serving and slinging chicken parm and God knows what else to hordes for tips to support myself. Also throughout that time, I've had the privilege of working alongside some of the hardest working people I've ever met, people with much more resolve than I. Men and women who literally slave away at washing dishes or running food for close to no money, to people who do nothing but treat them like garbage, and then send the majority of it back to their home countries. Guys who emerge from kitchens at the end of the day covered in slop from head to toe, only to have people who've exited the restaurant scoff at them as they trotted off to their bike or the bus stop after a solid 12-14 hours of work.

In particular, we just had a stocker quit at the restaurant I've been at lately, this lady didn't speak a lick of English. Very sweet, never really spoke to anyone except one of the other bussers named Lucero. Turns out the year she'd been here, she'd been slaving away stocking plates and silverware in the States because her baby son needed to have an operation back in Peru to save his eyesight. She busted her a$$ for an entire year, leaving her husband and the rest of her family and friends, living with Lucero and saving almost every nickel. I can not imagine for the life of me ever sacrificing that much of myself like that, or the will that takes. Our entire staff found out about this yesterday, on her last day, and we immediately took up a collection and raised about another 400 bucks. We all presented it to her and she broke down crying instantly, everyone was in tears really, and I told her in Spanglish that I thought she was the bravest person I've ever met.

It's worth noting that there were plenty of times I'd see her pass a table, and see someone ask her for something, and she'd politely say "no English, sorry," and she then would come and get one of us to help out for whatever they needed. This of course infuriated some people, because God forbid someone doesn't get something at the exact millisecond that they want it. But I digress...

So, I guess my point is, appreciate what you have. And the next time you see someone at a restaurant clearing your table, or a dude at a gas station filling your tank, or a landscaper trimming your bushes, give him or her a smile and ask how they're doing. Ask them how their day's going and if people have been kind to them that day. It goes a long way, I swear. They're working pretty hard, probably harder than most of us do during the day. And in the meantime, this is for Eva and her son in Peru.

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LOL so you didn't have change for the lady, brought it back to her late, and you were rude about it?

No, it's true. These people work their asses off. I worked with this one guy who made $950 a week and sent $500 of it to Mexico for his family. Sure with the other $450 he used it on drugs, alcohol, "massages," and rent for his room in a basement of a house in a terrible area with owners who didn't live there. The point is that $500 a week probably reached a billion dollars in Mexico by week 3.

I have to say that waiting tables and/or driving or anything in restaurants >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> retail. They don't even get paid under the table!

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RJF -- GREAT POST man. Great post.

So true. I hate when people look down on others. Unfortunately it happens too often. Good way to look at it though (us being fortunate) vs looking down on others. Very well said...

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FWIW Someone at work one day several years ago made a comment about seeing someone in their 50s bagging groceries. It was in the negative tone I told him I have far more respect for that guy than someone younger begging on a street corner. I am fortunate to have steady employment for the last 25 years but to this day have never forgotten what it's like to have no job and money. It is amazing how fast people turn their back on you when your down and out. No matter what service I get I always tip those who do a good job -- It is the least I can do. When we were on a cruise last month my wife and I always ask the workers where they are from - Amazing some of the stories you hear and everyone of them have family they are supporting far away and all their money goes to them. I count my blessings everyday.

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