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Home ownership, the honeymoon is over...


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21 replies to this topic

#1 Integrity28

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 10:28 AM

So, the guy that lived in this house before me apparently used a tan / off-white exterior latex gloss paint on all of the trim in the house OVER an oil-based paint without priming it, sanding it or scoring it.

 

Every time we brush anything against the trim, or molding, or the built-ins, it peels back in a rubbery clump.

 

I bought a sander, some Zinsaar 1-2-3 primer, and some ultra white paint with primer in it as well, and got to work this past week.

 

Starting with the nursery for the baby, the master bath and the kitchen I will be sanding down all of the trim, then priming and repainting it. Then the ceilings. Then the walls. 

 

I think this is going to take me the first 1-2 years, since the baby is due in a couple weeks.

 

Any of you good peeps encounter anything like this? Have any thoughts on how to remove both the old latex and oil-based paints? I chose sanding because I can seal off the rooms I'm working in, and tarp all the appliances, and somewhat control the dust - versus chemical strippers and scraping, because I want to minimize the vapors in the air at the house.

 

 


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#2 Pacmule

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 10:45 AM

Call me when you're ready to work on the yard.
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#3 JoeC36

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 10:50 AM

This isn't what you want to hear, but IMHO it may be easier and quicker to go to Lowes or Home Depot and pick out new trim and just put up the new stuff yourself. To sand it all or even go at it with paint remover, like you said is a HUGE time commitment. 


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#4 Maxman

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 11:40 AM

Definitely more money but I like Joe's idea.  Do the trim one room at a time to keep the costs down.


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#5 Integrity28

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 11:43 AM

This isn't what you want to hear, but IMHO it may be easier and quicker to go to Lowes or Home Depot and pick out new trim and just put up the new stuff yourself. To sand it all or even go at it with paint remover, like you said is a HUGE time commitment. 

 

It is definitely something I've considered, however, the old trim throughout the house is that classic, hardwood you get with a 70 year old New England colonial. I've very torn on this, both of us are. Underneath the other guy's ill-fated efforts to updated it, it's beautiful. 

 

We both look at the house as move-in ready and NOT in immediate need of any work. So whatever we do to it, is voluntary and ambitious. Like updating the molding color, despite the amount of prep work that comes with it.

 

I have to admit, I'm in love with having all the home projects to work on. After 15+ years of apartment living, I can finally invest my blood, sweat and creativity into something of my own. I love it.


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#6 Integrity28

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 11:45 AM

Definitely more money but I like Joe's idea.  Do the trim one room at a time to keep the costs down.

 

I'm doing this one room at a time, no matter how I attack it.

 

The real issue is with the built-ins, there's no replacing those. They are classic.


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#7 JoeC36

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 11:57 AM

It is definitely something I've considered, however, the old trim throughout the house is that classic, hardwood you get with a 70 year old New England colonial. I've very torn on this, both of us are. Underneath the other guy's ill-fated efforts to updated it, it's beautiful. 

 

We both look at the house as move-in ready and NOT in immediate need of any work. So whatever we do to it, is voluntary and ambitious. Like updating the molding color, despite the amount of prep work that comes with it.

 

I have to admit, I'm in love with having all the home projects to work on. After 15+ years of apartment living, I can finally invest my blood, sweat and creativity into something of my own. I love it.

 

I thought about that right after I posted it.  Let us know what happens. 


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#8 Integrity28

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 12:02 PM

I thought about that right after I posted it.  Let us know what happens. 

 

Yea, will do. I'm trying to make sure I get good before and after shots of everything I do in the house.


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#9 JerryK

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 12:27 PM

Continue with your plan and see how it evolves, over time it might get easier:

 

Experiment with the amount of sanding -You might discover you only have to sand down a certain depth before you get a primable/paintable surface.

 

(after sanding) Will the paint+primer stick without needing the Zinsser product?  I painted over glossy varnished oak railings with just a light sanding + paint with primer.  Still holding strong after a year.

 

 

 

 

 

..I might get flamed for having painted glossy oak, but I'm just not into the country look.


Edited by JerryK, 20 August 2013 - 12:29 PM.

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#10 Integrity28

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 03:40 PM

Continue with your plan and see how it evolves, over time it might get easier:

 

Experiment with the amount of sanding -You might discover you only have to sand down a certain depth before you get a primable/paintable surface.

 

(after sanding) Will the paint+primer stick without needing the Zinsser product?  I painted over glossy varnished oak railings with just a light sanding + paint with primer.  Still holding strong after a year.

 

 

 

 

 

..I might get flamed for having painted glossy oak, but I'm just not into the country look.

 

Good thought - and you may be right.

 

I was putting the 2nd skim coat on my bathroom last night and noticed some bubbling of the paint I was applying it over. I put a small slice in it and peeled it back and it was more of the "old banana yellow" oil based paint. The original owner must've used that on the bathroom walls too - and the guy who had the house before me just painted over it like a slap dick. I ended up peeling a huge portion off, scoring it with my razor knife since there was wet joint compound everywhere and then skimming it in hopes it'll adhere. (Fingers crossed.)

 

I grew up in a house with stained wood trim - I liked it in my house growing up, but for me I'm all about the ultra white trim. I love that look. Especially in a poorly lit room, it brings it to life. Which is what you want in a nursery.


Edited by Integrity28, 20 August 2013 - 03:41 PM.

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#11 JerryK

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 03:52 PM

I see it's an older home.  If the paint goes back to the 70's it might be lead based, so you might be better off removing as much as you can.  

Especially in a nursery at floor level.

 

Which I realize is kinda opposite my earlier advice.   :)


Edited by JerryK, 20 August 2013 - 03:52 PM.

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#12 Integrity28

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 03:58 PM

I see it's an older home.  If the paint goes back to the 70's it might be lead based, so you might be better off removing as much as you can.  

Especially in a nursery at floor level.

 

Which I realize is kinda opposite my earlier advice.   :)

 

I tested the walls and trim in that room with an in-home kit made by D-Lead. One of only 3 kits approved by the EPA. 0% false positives. Hopefully I can trust the results. I'm considering having the rest of the house checked out professionally, despite everyone I know saying it's probably fine if all the spots I tested showed no signs of lead. 

 

I wouldn't have done all that sanding if I hadn't test first. 


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#13 Lizard King

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 04:30 PM

This sounds like an awful project. But good luck
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#14 HessStation

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 08:49 PM

Is the color that bad? Or is it bc it's peeling? Agreed this project sounds horrendous. Tbh if ever there was a time to just pay a professional to do, it would something like this. Especially if a baby is coming soon. Painting the walls and ceilings is one thing...but this sounds like too much for anyone to just try an do alone.

None of the trim on our house is painted, it's just natural wood look, stained of some sort...and I hate it. White trim makes the whole house look nicer and more vibrant. But no way in hell, NO WAY could I tackle such a project, even just to prime and paint it, myself. And I know it's really expensive to do, JUST to prime and paint, nevermind stripping it first, which is why ours is still just wood look.

A serious good luck!
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#15 Integrity28

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 12:57 PM

This sounds like an awful project. But good luck

 

It's an ambitious one - but I don't mind it so far. Thanks.

 

Is the color that bad? Or is it bc it's peeling? Agreed this project sounds horrendous. Tbh if ever there was a time to just pay a professional to do, it would something like this. Especially if a baby is coming soon. Painting the walls and ceilings is one thing...but this sounds like too much for anyone to just try an do alone.

None of the trim on our house is painted, it's just natural wood look, stained of some sort...and I hate it. White trim makes the whole house look nicer and more vibrant. But no way in hell, NO WAY could I tackle such a project, even just to prime and paint it, myself. And I know it's really expensive to do, JUST to prime and paint, nevermind stripping it first, which is why ours is still just wood look.

A serious good luck!

 

Both.

 

Since last summer I have paid cash for us to keep our apartment in Mass, live in Indiana for a month during her father's passing, then move from one Mass apartment to another, then paid for our wedding in Indiana, then my sister's wedding, then our honeymoon, then putting the deposit on the house, then moving us again from apartment to house, then my brother's wedding, then furniture and appliances for the new house (fridge, washer/dryer, couch, dining set, outdoor furniture, weber grill, 3 air conditioners), upgrading the electric to 200 amp and performing about $2k in service that was needed, and much more "first time home owner startup costs" and "first baby costs" including crib and furniture.

 

In all of this, the only debt I've accrued is the mortgage.

 

So, the option to pay someone for this... is kinda off the table. :)

 

... and thanks. 


Edited by Integrity28, 22 August 2013 - 12:57 PM.

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#16 T0mShane

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 06:36 PM

I wasn't going to offer this info up because you'll blame me if it goes bad, but if you use a heat gun, that paint should practically fall off. Just don't burn the house down.
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#17 Lizard King

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 06:17 AM

It's an ambitious one - but I don't mind it so far. Thanks.


Both.

Since last summer I have paid cash for us to keep our apartment in Mass, live in Indiana for a month during her father's passing, then move from one Mass apartment to another, then paid for our wedding in Indiana, then my sister's wedding, then our honeymoon, then putting the deposit on the house, then moving us again from apartment to house, then my brother's wedding, then furniture and appliances for the new house (fridge, washer/dryer, couch, dining set, outdoor furniture, weber grill, 3 air conditioners), upgrading the electric to 200 amp and performing about $2k in service that was needed, and much more "first time home owner startup costs" and "first baby costs" including crib and furniture.

In all of this, the only debt I've accrued is the mortgage.

So, the option to pay someone for this... is kinda off the table. :)

... and thanks.


Home improvement can be extremely gratifying when it goes the way you want it to. I wish you the best of luck and did not mean to demean your efforts it is all personal style!
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#18 Integrity28

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 08:42 AM

I wasn't going to offer this info up because you'll blame me if it goes bad, but if you use a heat gun, that paint should practically fall off. Just don't burn the house down.

 

I considered it, and am still thinking about it. I'd probably want to rent one and give it a try. 

 

Home improvement can be extremely gratifying when it goes the way you want it to. I wish you the best of luck and did not mean to demean your efforts it is all personal style!

 

Didn't take it that way at all, I posted to get suggestions - you guys have all given me great ones, and helped me realize what I'm taking on. Thanks!


Edited by Integrity28, 23 August 2013 - 08:43 AM.

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#19 Larz

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 06:31 PM

one of my bathrooms was wallpapered on top of wallpaper.  the wife got sick of it

 

so instead of looking into how to get it off she just goes bezerk while Im at work and i come home to semi demolished room

 

I wound up just hanging new drywall

 

fml


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#20 Integrity28

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 07:13 PM

one of my bathrooms was wallpapered on top of wallpaper.  the wife got sick of it

 

so instead of looking into how to get it off she just goes bezerk while Im at work and i come home to semi demolished room

 

I wound up just hanging new drywall

 

fml

 

 

LOL, my Mom used to do that to my Dad all the time growing up.

 

Fortunately, my wife believes on making decisions together, and having a plan before we take action.


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#21 JohnnyHector

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 10:21 PM

I have to admit, I'm in love with having all the home projects to work on. After 15+ years of apartment living, I can finally invest my blood, sweat and creativity into something of my own. I love it.

 

Ah, the exuberance of a new homeowner...  I, for one, long for my condo where I never had to worry bout landscaping, snow removal, replacing the roof, etc. 

 

I can't wait to finish what I need to in this house, because when I buy the next one, I don't intend to do a ******* thing aside from vanity projects like an outdoor bar and kitchen.  At some point in my life, I'd like to actually be able to enjoy the limited hours I get to spend at home.

 

As for your dilemma, I'm with Shane on the heat gun for situations like this.  The dipsh*t before me had painted the shower basin, which started flaking off.  I wound up stripping like 5 coats of paint with the heat gun... just don't accidentally knock it off the spot you had it resting over to cool, only to have it swing into your leg and singe off your hair.  I've been told that can happen.


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#22 Integrity28

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 11:25 PM

Ah, the exuberance of a new homeowner...  I, for one, long for my condo where I never had to worry bout landscaping, snow removal, replacing the roof, etc. 

 

I can't wait to finish what I need to in this house, because when I buy the next one, I don't intend to do a ******* thing aside from vanity projects like an outdoor bar and kitchen.  At some point in my life, I'd like to actually be able to enjoy the limited hours I get to spend at home.

 

As for your dilemma, I'm with Shane on the heat gun for situations like this.  The dipsh*t before me had painted the shower basin, which started flaking off.  I wound up stripping like 5 coats of paint with the heat gun... just don't accidentally knock it off the spot you had it resting over to cool, only to have it swing into your leg and singe off your hair.  I've been told that can happen.

 

Yeah, heat gun is clutch - stripped 3 doors this weekend, and the remainder of the trim in the 2 rooms I'm updating. It probably takes about 3/4 the time that sanding did, but it's much more thorough - I am going to have to hit everything with a finishing sander too though.

 

Should have paint on it tomorrow or Thursday, as long as she doesn't go into labor. Looking forward to seeing the end results.


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