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#1 kelly

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 09:31 AM

There seems to be a certain amount of confusion regarding the Darrelle
Revis situation, the Jets' cap situation, restructuring contracts, and
various and sundry other messy details. I'm going to attempt to address
many of the most common misconceptions being spread by the media and
others and shed some light on what is really going on. Read on if you
can stand exploring some of the arcane details necessary for a better
understanding of these issues.

Myth #1: The Jets cannot restructure Mark Sanchez' contract (or fill in
the blank with your favorite outsize contract) because he would be a
fool to accept less money.

Reality: Restructuring contracts more often than not does not involve
the player accepting less money. It CAN, and sometimes does, but more
often restructuring a contract leaves the total guaranteed $ in place.
What happens is base salary (which is always fully applied to the
current year salary cap) is converted into signing bonus (which can be
spread out in equal annual amounts over up to 5 years). So, as an
example, if player X has a 2013 contract with a base salary of $12
million, all guaranteed, all of that $12 million would count against the
2013 cap. But if we converted $10 million of it into a signing bonus,
the cap hit for that $10 million would be spread out over 5 years,
making the cap hit as follows: 2013 $4 million ($2 million in remaining
base salary plus $2 million prorated signing bonus). 2014-2017 $2
million each year in prorated signing bonus. Thus player X still gets
all his guaranteed money, but the cap hit for 2013 is reduced from $12
million to $4 million. If you really want to get creative, you can even
delay payment of the signing bonus until 2014 (or later), further
reducing the 2013 cap hit to just $2 million, at the cost of further
extending the cap hit into later years.

The point here is Sanchez (or anyone else) does not have to be a fool to
restructure his contract and provide the Jets cap relief. Restructuring
contracts need not cost the player a cent. Whether or not it is
advisable for the Jets to push out the cap hits into later years is an
entirely different issue. It may well be the Jets would be fools for
restructuring certain contracts -- the players, however, should not have
a problem with it. That brings us to...

Myth #2: Santonio Holmes (or David Harris, or choose your favorite
outsized contract) is untradable because his contract is so large no
team would want to take it on.

Reality: No player who still is capable of playing in the NFL is
completely untradable. As we discussed above, any player can have his
contract restructured. The acquiring team in a trade picks up base
salary and any currently unearned roster, workout and reporting bonuses.
All prorated signing bonuses stay with the team trading the player, and
are immediately accelerated into the current cap year.

Trading any player with any value as a player (i.e., maybe not Tebow, or
Sanchez) is not impossible. You simply have to get the cap figure for
the acquiring team down enough to make the player attractive at that cap
figure. The way to do that is to convert base salary into signing
bonus. So, as an example, Santonio Holmes has a 2013 cap figure of
$12,500,000, with $11 million in base salary. Any team acquiring that
contract would be taking on $11 million in cap space, too much for a
player like Holmes. But convert say $8,000,000 of his base salary into a
signing bonus, and the cap hit for the acquiring team becomes a very
manageable $3 million. Just like that, an untradable player becomes
eminently tradable.

There are two caveats to this. First, doing a deal like this creates
dead money. In the Holmes example, we now have $8 million on the cap
which is going to a player no longer on the team -- dead money. It is
not ideal, and you can only do so much of this kind of thing before half
the cap is being spent on other teams' players, but in small doses for
the right trades it works. The other caveat is that you have to convince
the player to restructure. As a monetary matter this shouldn't be
difficult, as the restructuring preserves all of the player's money and
in fact gets it to him faster. However, the player in effect has a no
trade clause, in that if he hates the idea of playing for the new team,
he has only to refuse to restructure. In that case you either have to
find a more palatable team to trade with or sweeten the pot for the
player. In most cases it should be doable, if the Jets are highly
motivated to get the deal done, but the player can and occasionally does
throw up a roadblock to a trade.

Myth #3: The Jets are in salary cap hell in 2013 and simply have no way
of affording anything other than bargain basement players.

Reality: The Jets can afford to be major players in the free agent
market, if they are so inclined. The Jets right now are already under
the cap by enough to afford their draft class and sign one pretty good
free agent. If the Jets want to go all in for 2013, they have
significant room under current contracts to restructure and create ample
space under the cap. Sanchez, Harris, Holmes, Cromartie, Ferguson,
Mangold collectively represent as much as $40 million in base salary,
roster bonuses, workout bonuses and reporting bonuses that can be
restructured into signing bonuses that are prorated, moving as much as
$32 million into later years' cap. This may or may not be something the
Jets should do, and it may or may not be something Idzik decides to do,
but it is most definitely something the Jets CAN do. If the Jets only
sign bargain basement players in 2013, it should be understood that this
was a CHOICE the Jets made after considering what was in the best
interests of the organization, not something forced on them by an
impossible cap situation.

Myth #4: The Jets cannot afford to re-sign Revis under the 2013 cap.

Reality: Revis is signed through the end of 2013. Any extension will rip
up the voidable years of his contract (2014-2016) and replace them with
something much larger in $. But it will only effect the 2013 cap figure
if the Jets choose to structure it this way. If the Jets choose it is
not at all difficult to restructure in such a way that 2013 remains
untouched. It is even possible, though unlikely, to restructure in a way
that LOWERS the 2013 cap figure (for example, by converting some of his
$6 million in base salary and non-proratable bonus money in 2013 into a
signing bonus, and prorating this into future years). Affording Revis
will not be easy, but the current cap situation should not pose any
impediment to getting it done. And 2014 cap room is more than ample to
fit Revis in. The Jets can afford Revis. The question is, do they want
to?

Myth #5: Sanchez's contract impacts the Jets' ability to fit Revis under the cap.

Reality: Sanchez's contract is structured in such a way that all his
guaranteed money will be paid out by the end of the 2013 season. By 2014
the Jets can afford to cut Sanchez. Since Sanchez only has an outsize
effect on the Jets cap in 2013, and a new Revis contract would only
effect the Jets cap space in 2014 and beyond, the two are completely
unrelated issues. So long as the Jets don't move most of Sanchez's cap $
into 2014, Sanchez's contract will have no effect on the Jets' ability
to fit Revis under the cap.

 

Myth #6: If Revis is traded he will bring back a package of 2013 draft picks.

Reality: It's possible but not probable.

Revis is unlikely to be traded before the 2013 draft. Here’s why.

First, he will not even be running until early April at the earliest.
That’s straight line running, no cuts. No doctor in the world can at
that stage of the recovery accurately predict how the knee will hold up
in game conditions, hence no meaningful medical approval is possible.
All they can say is he is progressing reasonably well so far. Teams will
want to see him actually play cornerback. AP is NOT a template.
Peterson's recovery was such an outlier in terms of how quickly he came
back it was pretty much a medical miracle. This is the gold standard of
recoveries -- it is silly to think all future recoveries will follow the
same miraculous course. Revis is already 2 1/2 months behind AP. Plus a
significant % of guys NEVER return to their former form.

Putting aside the health issues, which I think almost everyone is WAY
too confident about, there is an even more fundamental reason Revis will
not be traded for 2013 picks: his contract. If Revis is traded PRIOR to
June 1st, all cap ramifications flow into the 2013 cap. Those
ramifications are as follows: a net $4 million INCREASE to the Jets cap
#, even after accounting for the trading partner picking up his base
salary and roster bonus, due to the prorated bonus money which will be
immediately accelerated. Bottom line, as of now Revis counts $9 million
against the 2013 cap. If he is traded prior to June 1 he will count $13
million against the 2013 cap.

It gets worse. Suppose he is traded for a single #1 pick. That pick will
cost an additional $2 million or so against the cap, bringing the total
cap hit to $6 million, and in effect meaning Revis will cost us $15
million in 2013 cap space. If we got more high picks, the effect would
of course be even worse.

Compare that to simply waiting until after June 1. Then all prorated cap
money would be counted against the 2014 cap. Bottom line: $9 million in
prorated money would be accelerated into the 2014 cap, not the 2013
cap. Revis would then count only $4 million against the cap, and the
picks would be 2014 picks, counting zero against the 2013 cap. Net
result: simply waiting until after June 1 to trade him will save the
Jets a whopping $11 million or more (depending on the return package of
picks) in 2013 cap space.

The Jets may be hell bent to trade Revis as soon as possible and take
the entire cap hit in 2013. If so it pretty much signals that Idzik is
writing off the 2013 season. I consider this highly unlikely, but not
impossible. By simply waiting until after June 1 to trade Revis, if that
is what the Jets wish to do, the Jets save at least $11 million in 2013
cap space, at the cost of that cap hit taking place in 2014. Since the
Jets are in far better shape cap wise in 2014, I consider it far more
likely that if Revis is traded, he will be traded for 2014 picks.

Myth #7: If Revis is lost to free agency, the Jets will get a 3rd round compensatory draft pick.

Reality: The Jets will receive a 3rd round pick as compensation for
Revis ONLY if the Jets do not sign any notable free agents in 2014.
Compensation is intended to be for NET losses; i.e., weighing how much a
team gained by signing FAs vs. how much they lost by other teams'
signing their FAs. Since as it now stands the Jets will have
considerable cap space in 2014, the likelihood of the Jets failing to
sign any notable free agents is pretty low. If they do sign high end
free agents of their own, then the compensation for Revis will be
reduced accordingly. If the Jets sign enough FAs in 2014, then they may
get no compensation at all for Revis.

Myth #8: The Jets cannot cut Player X because it would leave them with too much dead money.

Reality: Teams don't like dead money. It's money that counts against the
cap being spent on players no longer with the team. In an ideal world
you would never have any dead money. But the reality is dead money is
already spent, and will count against the cap whether or not Player X is
cut. So the only real issue is, does cutting Player X help the team? If
it does, Player X can be cut, regardless of dead money. I can think of
at least 2 scenarios where this is the case. The first: cutting Player X
frees up enough cap space to make the dead money worthwhile. So, for
example, if Player X is no longer good enough to play, and cutting him
will result in $4 million in dead money but $7 million in cap savings,
Player X should be cut, dead money or no dead money. The second scenario
is where having a player on the team would result in a fractured locker
room, or the player is a terrible influence on the team or undermines
the coaches' authority. Then you have to get rid of him, dead money or
no.

Dead money is always a consideration, and too much dead money cripples
your cap situation, but there is always the possibility that cutting a
player and eating the dead money is in the best interests of the team.

Myth #9: The Jets talk too much.

Reality: This may be the most pervasive and pernicious myth of all Jets
myths. The truth is, Tone talks some. Cro talks some. Scott talks some.
But none of them are over the top. And.. and... who else? The Jets don't
talk any more than almost any other team. Richard Sherman does more
talking than all the Jets players combined, and I don't hear anything
about how the Seahawks talk too much.
 
There is one reason and only one reason this myth got started: Rex Ryan.
Rex in the early days did nothing but run his mouth. However, even Rex
doesn't really talk much these days, other than to compliment other
teams. The notion that the Jets talk too much is a tired and outdated
caricature that should be put to rest permanently.

I hope I have set some things straight here. But what about you? What Jets myths would you like to see put to rest?
        

> i saw this on " another fan site " .


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i ♥ u guys :P.. ...cheers ~ ~

#2 faba

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 09:34 AM

For Mark it is just better to take this year salary and not hurt us in future years- sad but reality.


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Treat people with how you want to be treated-with respect.

#3 Integrity28

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 11:48 AM

If "Jets talk too much" is one of the myths that needs busting, then it's probably true. LOL

 

*yawn*


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"Idz a process."

 

Posted Image


#4 Sperm Edwards

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 12:37 PM

The problem with the analysis on Sanchez's cap number is that it ignores the fact that the player also has a base salary in those "years" you've pushed the signing bonus off to.  And "years" is really "year" because we're not keeping him at the salaries outlined under that Tannenbaum extension anyway.  So if you make almost all of his salary into signing bonus (can't completely, as he has a minimum NFL salary), and count just under $2M/year as bonus money, it's absurd.

 

$2M/year for '13, '14, '15, and '16 (and therefore saving $5.5M give or take for '13) is - or should be - a theoretical fantasy.  He's getting cut after '13 unless he's willing to take a true $10M paycut.  So then for '14 you've got

 

$2M = the '14 bonus allotment of this new bonus

$4M = the accelerated '15 and '16 allotment of this new bonus

$5M = the accelerated '14-'16 of prior bonus from his extension

-----

$11M = total cap hit to cut prior to 2014.  (Oh yeah, and he still counts over $7M this year as well).

 

Compare that to keeping doing nothing and cutting him prior to 2014 ($13M this year and $5M next year) or cutting him outright before he gets his $500K workout bonus ($17M this year and nothing next year & beyond).

 

 

Converting almost all of his salary to new signing bonus, and passing it off as being a good thing, is the Jets myth.


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JetNation.com
 

 

 


#5 JoeC36

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:05 PM

There seems to be a certain amount of confusion regarding the Darrelle
Revis situation, the Jets' cap situation, restructuring contracts, and
various and sundry other messy details. I'm going to attempt to address
many of the most common misconceptions being spread by the media and
others and shed some light on what is really going on. Read on if you
can stand exploring some of the arcane details necessary for a better
understanding of these issues.

Myth #1: The Jets cannot restructure Mark Sanchez' contract (or fill in
the blank with your favorite outsize contract) because he would be a
fool to accept less money.

Reality: Restructuring contracts more often than not does not involve
the player accepting less money. It CAN, and sometimes does, but more
often restructuring a contract leaves the total guaranteed $ in place.
What happens is base salary (which is always fully applied to the
current year salary cap) is converted into signing bonus (which can be
spread out in equal annual amounts over up to 5 years). So, as an
example, if player X has a 2013 contract with a base salary of $12
million, all guaranteed, all of that $12 million would count against the
2013 cap. But if we converted $10 million of it into a signing bonus,
the cap hit for that $10 million would be spread out over 5 years,
making the cap hit as follows: 2013 $4 million ($2 million in remaining
base salary plus $2 million prorated signing bonus). 2014-2017 $2
million each year in prorated signing bonus. Thus player X still gets
all his guaranteed money, but the cap hit for 2013 is reduced from $12
million to $4 million. If you really want to get creative, you can even
delay payment of the signing bonus until 2014 (or later), further
reducing the 2013 cap hit to just $2 million, at the cost of further
extending the cap hit into later years.

The point here is Sanchez (or anyone else) does not have to be a fool to
restructure his contract and provide the Jets cap relief. Restructuring
contracts need not cost the player a cent. Whether or not it is
advisable for the Jets to push out the cap hits into later years is an
entirely different issue. It may well be the Jets would be fools for
restructuring certain contracts -- the players, however, should not have
a problem with it. That brings us to...

Myth #2: Santonio Holmes (or David Harris, or choose your favorite
outsized contract) is untradable because his contract is so large no
team would want to take it on.

Reality: No player who still is capable of playing in the NFL is
completely untradable. As we discussed above, any player can have his
contract restructured. The acquiring team in a trade picks up base
salary and any currently unearned roster, workout and reporting bonuses.
All prorated signing bonuses stay with the team trading the player, and
are immediately accelerated into the current cap year.

Trading any player with any value as a player (i.e., maybe not Tebow, or
Sanchez) is not impossible. You simply have to get the cap figure for
the acquiring team down enough to make the player attractive at that cap
figure. The way to do that is to convert base salary into signing
bonus. So, as an example, Santonio Holmes has a 2013 cap figure of
$12,500,000, with $11 million in base salary. Any team acquiring that
contract would be taking on $11 million in cap space, too much for a
player like Holmes. But convert say $8,000,000 of his base salary into a
signing bonus, and the cap hit for the acquiring team becomes a very
manageable $3 million. Just like that, an untradable player becomes
eminently tradable.

There are two caveats to this. First, doing a deal like this creates
dead money. In the Holmes example, we now have $8 million on the cap
which is going to a player no longer on the team -- dead money. It is
not ideal, and you can only do so much of this kind of thing before half
the cap is being spent on other teams' players, but in small doses for
the right trades it works. The other caveat is that you have to convince
the player to restructure. As a monetary matter this shouldn't be
difficult, as the restructuring preserves all of the player's money and
in fact gets it to him faster. However, the player in effect has a no
trade clause, in that if he hates the idea of playing for the new team,
he has only to refuse to restructure. In that case you either have to
find a more palatable team to trade with or sweeten the pot for the
player. In most cases it should be doable, if the Jets are highly
motivated to get the deal done, but the player can and occasionally does
throw up a roadblock to a trade.

Myth #3: The Jets are in salary cap hell in 2013 and simply have no way
of affording anything other than bargain basement players.

Reality: The Jets can afford to be major players in the free agent
market, if they are so inclined. The Jets right now are already under
the cap by enough to afford their draft class and sign one pretty good
free agent. If the Jets want to go all in for 2013, they have
significant room under current contracts to restructure and create ample
space under the cap. Sanchez, Harris, Holmes, Cromartie, Ferguson,
Mangold collectively represent as much as $40 million in base salary,
roster bonuses, workout bonuses and reporting bonuses that can be
restructured into signing bonuses that are prorated, moving as much as
$32 million into later years' cap. This may or may not be something the
Jets should do, and it may or may not be something Idzik decides to do,
but it is most definitely something the Jets CAN do. If the Jets only
sign bargain basement players in 2013, it should be understood that this
was a CHOICE the Jets made after considering what was in the best
interests of the organization, not something forced on them by an
impossible cap situation.

Myth #4: The Jets cannot afford to re-sign Revis under the 2013 cap.

Reality: Revis is signed through the end of 2013. Any extension will rip
up the voidable years of his contract (2014-2016) and replace them with
something much larger in $. But it will only effect the 2013 cap figure
if the Jets choose to structure it this way. If the Jets choose it is
not at all difficult to restructure in such a way that 2013 remains
untouched. It is even possible, though unlikely, to restructure in a way
that LOWERS the 2013 cap figure (for example, by converting some of his
$6 million in base salary and non-proratable bonus money in 2013 into a
signing bonus, and prorating this into future years). Affording Revis
will not be easy, but the current cap situation should not pose any
impediment to getting it done. And 2014 cap room is more than ample to
fit Revis in. The Jets can afford Revis. The question is, do they want
to?

Myth #5: Sanchez's contract impacts the Jets' ability to fit Revis under the cap.

Reality: Sanchez's contract is structured in such a way that all his
guaranteed money will be paid out by the end of the 2013 season. By 2014
the Jets can afford to cut Sanchez. Since Sanchez only has an outsize
effect on the Jets cap in 2013, and a new Revis contract would only
effect the Jets cap space in 2014 and beyond, the two are completely
unrelated issues. So long as the Jets don't move most of Sanchez's cap $
into 2014, Sanchez's contract will have no effect on the Jets' ability
to fit Revis under the cap.

 

Myth #6: If Revis is traded he will bring back a package of 2013 draft picks.

Reality: It's possible but not probable.

Revis is unlikely to be traded before the 2013 draft. Here’s why.

First, he will not even be running until early April at the earliest.
That’s straight line running, no cuts. No doctor in the world can at
that stage of the recovery accurately predict how the knee will hold up
in game conditions, hence no meaningful medical approval is possible.
All they can say is he is progressing reasonably well so far. Teams will
want to see him actually play cornerback. AP is NOT a template.
Peterson's recovery was such an outlier in terms of how quickly he came
back it was pretty much a medical miracle. This is the gold standard of
recoveries -- it is silly to think all future recoveries will follow the
same miraculous course. Revis is already 2 1/2 months behind AP. Plus a
significant % of guys NEVER return to their former form.

Putting aside the health issues, which I think almost everyone is WAY
too confident about, there is an even more fundamental reason Revis will
not be traded for 2013 picks: his contract. If Revis is traded PRIOR to
June 1st, all cap ramifications flow into the 2013 cap. Those
ramifications are as follows: a net $4 million INCREASE to the Jets cap
#, even after accounting for the trading partner picking up his base
salary and roster bonus, due to the prorated bonus money which will be
immediately accelerated. Bottom line, as of now Revis counts $9 million
against the 2013 cap. If he is traded prior to June 1 he will count $13
million against the 2013 cap.

It gets worse. Suppose he is traded for a single #1 pick. That pick will
cost an additional $2 million or so against the cap, bringing the total
cap hit to $6 million, and in effect meaning Revis will cost us $15
million in 2013 cap space. If we got more high picks, the effect would
of course be even worse.

Compare that to simply waiting until after June 1. Then all prorated cap
money would be counted against the 2014 cap. Bottom line: $9 million in
prorated money would be accelerated into the 2014 cap, not the 2013
cap. Revis would then count only $4 million against the cap, and the
picks would be 2014 picks, counting zero against the 2013 cap. Net
result: simply waiting until after June 1 to trade him will save the
Jets a whopping $11 million or more (depending on the return package of
picks) in 2013 cap space.

The Jets may be hell bent to trade Revis as soon as possible and take
the entire cap hit in 2013. If so it pretty much signals that Idzik is
writing off the 2013 season. I consider this highly unlikely, but not
impossible. By simply waiting until after June 1 to trade Revis, if that
is what the Jets wish to do, the Jets save at least $11 million in 2013
cap space, at the cost of that cap hit taking place in 2014. Since the
Jets are in far better shape cap wise in 2014, I consider it far more
likely that if Revis is traded, he will be traded for 2014 picks.

Myth #7: If Revis is lost to free agency, the Jets will get a 3rd round compensatory draft pick.

Reality: The Jets will receive a 3rd round pick as compensation for
Revis ONLY if the Jets do not sign any notable free agents in 2014.
Compensation is intended to be for NET losses; i.e., weighing how much a
team gained by signing FAs vs. how much they lost by other teams'
signing their FAs. Since as it now stands the Jets will have
considerable cap space in 2014, the likelihood of the Jets failing to
sign any notable free agents is pretty low. If they do sign high end
free agents of their own, then the compensation for Revis will be
reduced accordingly. If the Jets sign enough FAs in 2014, then they may
get no compensation at all for Revis.

Myth #8: The Jets cannot cut Player X because it would leave them with too much dead money.

Reality: Teams don't like dead money. It's money that counts against the
cap being spent on players no longer with the team. In an ideal world
you would never have any dead money. But the reality is dead money is
already spent, and will count against the cap whether or not Player X is
cut. So the only real issue is, does cutting Player X help the team? If
it does, Player X can be cut, regardless of dead money. I can think of
at least 2 scenarios where this is the case. The first: cutting Player X
frees up enough cap space to make the dead money worthwhile. So, for
example, if Player X is no longer good enough to play, and cutting him
will result in $4 million in dead money but $7 million in cap savings,
Player X should be cut, dead money or no dead money. The second scenario
is where having a player on the team would result in a fractured locker
room, or the player is a terrible influence on the team or undermines
the coaches' authority. Then you have to get rid of him, dead money or
no.

Dead money is always a consideration, and too much dead money cripples
your cap situation, but there is always the possibility that cutting a
player and eating the dead money is in the best interests of the team.

Myth #9: The Jets talk too much.

Reality: This may be the most pervasive and pernicious myth of all Jets
myths. The truth is, Tone talks some. Cro talks some. Scott talks some.
But none of them are over the top. And.. and... who else? The Jets don't
talk any more than almost any other team. Richard Sherman does more
talking than all the Jets players combined, and I don't hear anything
about how the Seahawks talk too much.
 
There is one reason and only one reason this myth got started: Rex Ryan.
Rex in the early days did nothing but run his mouth. However, even Rex
doesn't really talk much these days, other than to compliment other
teams. The notion that the Jets talk too much is a tired and outdated
caricature that should be put to rest permanently.

I hope I have set some things straight here. But what about you? What Jets myths would you like to see put to rest?
        

> i saw this on " another fan site " .

 

we need a link next time Kelly.

 

Thanks


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289 Time Post of the Week Loser


#6 Greenseed4

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 12:40 AM

we need a link next time Kelly.

 

Thanks

 

He/She is normally really good about that. 


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#7 kelly

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 09:34 AM

we need a link next time Kelly.

 

Thanks

agreed...sorry 'bout that.


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i ♥ u guys :P.. ...cheers ~ ~

#8 JoeC36

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 05:49 PM

agreed...sorry 'bout that.

thanks babe


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289 Time Post of the Week Loser


#9 Il Mostro

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 08:23 PM

He/She is normally really good about that. 

 

A real two-way threat.


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#10 flgreen

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 08:29 PM

A real two-way threat.

:rl:


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#11 kelly

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 12:24 PM

A real two-way threat.

did you say 2-...https://sphotos-b.xx...5_1977120_n.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

:love0040:


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#12 Il Mostro

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 03:52 PM

did you say 2-...https://sphotos-b.xx...5_1977120_n.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

:love0040:

 

I've got to say, your little sister is really cute when she's passed out.   :-)


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#13 kelly

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 12:29 PM

I've got to say, your little sister is really cute when she's passed out.   :-)

thanx mostro ! !.. 

 

...oh , just an fyi ; that's me :love0040: ....peace :winking0001:


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#14 kelly

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 12:25 PM

options...

 

The Darrelle Revis saga plays on this week with the
Daily News reporting that the Jets were "actively shopping" the
cornerback during the Scouting Combine in Indianapolis. 


That comes on the heels of another

report that no one from the team met with Revis' representatives during
the meat market, which is odd since every team seems to meet with every
agent at a pre-free agency tampering convention disguised as a chance
for scouts to watch players that they've been scouting for months or
years run in a straight line. What's more, Rex Ryan has reportedly been
left out of the process, leaving new G.M. John Idzik and owner Woody
Johnson running the show. 


Naturally, this has been taken to

mean that the Jets are hellbent on trading Revis. Ryan's the only one
willing to go on the record and say he wants Revis on the team, but the
narrative is that the others are doing an end run to ditch Revis as soon
as possible. 


Maybe so, but these things can take a

lot of twists and turns before reaching their final conclusion. That's
especially true in cases like this one, where there are five distinct
options for how things could wind up for the Jets and Revis.


Option 1 - Trade Revis before the draft:

In a perfect world, this is the option that works best for the Jets
since they would be able to get new faces in April that would help turn
the page on the Revis era immediately. This isn't a perfect world,
though.Revis hasn't been on a field since

tearing his ACL, leaving teams to guess about his health and leaving the
Jets to have to consider taking 75 cents on the dollar in a deal
because they can't sell Revis' future by solely focusing on the past.
Beyond that, this is a draft that's shaping up to be a fairly
underpowered one so adding extra picks wouldn't necessarily do much to
kickstart the rebuild in green. 


Option 2 - Trade Revis this summer:

This option gives Revis time to get healthy and restore at least some
of his trade value, although any return in a deal would not be realized
until the 2014 draft. That's not a bad thing if it brings back more
value, although it would send an early white flag on the season. 


Option 3 - Trade Revis during the 2013 season:

Similar to the second option, although with the increased benefit of
time on the field to sell himself to other suitors as well as the
possibility that injury/ineffectiveness somewhere else would lead
someone to pay even more than the sticker price to grab Revis for their
secondary. Going this option runs the risk that Revis is a disgruntled
figure on the team as well as the risk of another injury that could
destroy any trade value whatsoever.  


Option 4 - Re-sign Revis:

The Jets aren't showing much interest in this course of action, which
makes sense given his injury and their dismal salary cap outlook. Not
even paying lip service to the idea of Revis remaining with the team is a
bit strange, and it suggests that we were probably heading for this
kind of situation even if Revis hadn't gone down in a heap against
Miami.If Revis is back to being Revis,

this is the best option because you don't win in the NFL by showing
great players the door. If this is off the table, though, the Jets might
as well make the trade whenever they get an offer that is even close
because the final option isn't an option at all.  


Option 5 - Let Revis walk as a free agent without any compensation:

This might not prove to be an option so much as a last resort, but it's
where this will head if the Jets aren't able to pull either of the
other triggers available to them. If it gets to this point, they'll
deserve every bit of mockery they will surely receive. 


Josh Alper is also a writer for Pro Football Talk. You can follow him on Twitter.

 

> http://www.nbcnewyor...-193565591.html


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#15 kelly

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 12:22 PM


Trying to balance the Jets' books
 
'Tis the season for number crunching.

The Jets, like many teams, have salary-cap concerns. They have
roughly $6 million in cap space, which doesn't allow them to be serious
players in free agency -- unless they create more room by cutting
players and/or restructuring contracts.

Here's a position-by-position breakdown of the cap totals, providing
insight into how the Jets have invested in recent years -- and where
they need to trim some fat. (Note: Totals don't include current free
agents such as Dustin Keller, Mike DeVito, LaRon Landry, et al. Allow small margin of error.)

OFFENSE

Quarterback : $16.48 million. Roughly 14 percent of cap devoted to a position that needs an overhaul. Yeesh.

Running back : $1.8 million. If the QB position is Peter Luger's Steakhouse, this is Burger King.

Wide receiver : $16.86 million. Not much bang for the buck, based on 2012 performance.

Tight end : $960,000. Konrad Reuland and Hayden Smith are the top guys under contract. Hence, the low number. They need Keller.

Offensive line : $22.12 million. A pretty high number, considering only two starters are under contract.

Offense total : $58.22 million

 
 
DEFENSE

Defensive line : $12.5 million. One of the few areas where the talent lines up with the cost. They're trying to re-sign DeVito.

Linebacker : $20.6 million. We're counting $4.5 million in dead money from Bart Scott, Calvin Pace cuts.

Secondary : $26.47 million. The total will increase by $3 million if they trade Darrelle Revis, if you can believe that. Landry will be a tough squeeze.

Defense total : $59.57 million

 

> http://espn.go.com/b...-the-jets-books


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#16 kelly

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 03:26 PM


Woody should be dealing with Revis
Jets owner needs to focus on signing his star cornerback rather than moving him

In the summer of 2010, Woody Johnson gave Darrelle Revis a four-year, $46 million contract meant to be revisited at a later date. Revis left those talks believing the New York Jets
were committed to redoing his deal after two years, and the Jets left
them believing they were committed to redoing his deal after three.


This was the source of their brief spat last July before Revis agreed
to report to camp, buckle up his chinstrap and play for a $7.5 million
wage. He would ultimately blow out his knee and watch the Jets stagger
to a 6-10 record that would cost general manager Mike Tannenbaum the job
now held by John Idzik.

The Jets have a new
boss above Rex Ryan, and three new coordinators below him, but one thing
never changed: The promise. In 2012, when they were busy refuting the
Revis camp's claim that a renegotiation was supposed to go down after
Year 2, a senior Jets official confirmed that the renegotiation was
always scheduled for 2013, when the Jets had no intention of having
Revis play for $6 million, or less than half his market value.

It would have been nice if Woody Johnson & Co. had discovered Darrelle Revis' demands before gauging outside interest.


So here we are in 2013, and guess what? The Jets don't want to give
their best player a new deal after all. They prefer to trade Revis not
because of the knee injury, and not because they suspect he isn't quite
the all-time Jet his own coach has made him out to be.

They prefer to trade Revis because Woody Johnson doesn't want to do the deal his words and actions said he'd do in 2010.


Actually, his football guy, Tannenbaum, is the one who made it
public at the time. "This is an intermediate step," the GM said, "to
what we hope will be an entire career of Darrelle as a Jet, for him to
retire as a Jet and for him to hopefully go to the Hall of Fame as a
Jet."

Tannenbaum was saying only what Johnson
cleared him to say, and again, what a senior team official confirmed
last summer. The Jets were calling the four-year deal to end the holdout
"an intermediate step." Revis? He was calling it a "Band-Aid," surely a
more fitting term for an owner born into the Johnson & Johnson
family.

Now Woody wants to skip that
intermediate step and make the soiled Band-Aid someone else's problem. A
league source confirmed reports that the Jets have talked to multiple
teams about the possibility of trading Revis, and no matter how you
slice it this is bad NFL business.



The Jets are negotiating with other teams before they negotiate with Revis himself.


Though the Jets haven't peddled the corner around the league, they
have listened to some interested parties. It would've been nice if
they'd listened to the most interested party of all, Revis, to find out
how much money he's actually looking for and how badly he wants to
remain a Jet.

It's the most amazing part of
this story, really, that Revis hopes to finish his career with the Jets
as much as Derek Jeter and Eli Manning
hope to finish with the Yankees and Giants. Revis, 27, was born 16
years after the Jets' one-and-done appearance in the Super Bowl, and yet
he burns to do what Joe Namath did not -- retire a one-uniform lifer.


Revis is the league's undisputed heavyweight champ at corner. His
work ethic is never in question, and people around the league know Adrian Peterson
is hardly the only player to fully recover from a serious knee injury.
Revis is on the front end of his prime, he wants to stay, and his head
coach wants him to stay, too.


And yet the Jets haven't bothered to talk to his

agents, Neil Schwartz and Jonathan Feinsod. They haven't bothered to see
if Revis truly wants Mario Williams money (six years, $100 million), or if he wants Calvin Johnson money (eight years, $132 million), or if he wants a figure north or south or somewhere in between.


The Jets haven't bothered to see if Revis is willing to offer a
bit of a hometown discount, or a bit of a surgically-repaired knee
discount. They haven't bothered to see if he's open to doing a
cap-friendly deal, or if he's A-OK with modest guaranteed cash in a
longer-term deal.

Remember, in the NFL, most
of these mega-contracts contain barrels of Monopoly money in them.
Unlike the A-Rods and LeBrons of the world, Revis would be guaranteed to
see about half of a potential nine-figure deal.


But right now, the Jets are acting as if they want Revis on another
team's payroll as quickly as possible. They should be focusing on
signing him rather than moving him. Ryan knows a Revis trade for draft
picks would all but seal his fate this time next year, when a third
consecutive non-playoff season will land him in Tannenbaum's shoes.

Ryan would much prefer to trade Antonio Cromartie
and apply the savings to Revis, according to a league source. If
Johnson and Idzik truly want to give their coach the fighting chance
they say they want to give him (You see why Woody should've fired Rex
along with Tannenbaum?), shouldn't they ship out Cromartie instead of
Revis, the superior player and character guy?


This is where the team owner has to declare himself. Even as he tries to
adhere to a budget his father would've scoffed at, Hal Steinbrenner
broke with team policy to pursue a deal with his best player, Robinson
Cano, a pending free agent who will want at least $200 million, all
guaranteed. Even as he pulled himself from the rubble of the Bernie
Madoff mess, Fred Wilpon signed his best player, David Wright, a pending
free agent who came off the board at eight years and $138 million, all
guaranteed.

 



Jets blog


nyj.gif
Looking for more on
the green and white? ESPNNewYork.com has you covered. Blog »


How does Woody Johnson respond when his best
player and pending free agent steps to the plate and swings for a
guarantee worth less than half of Wright's? By ordering the intentional
pass?

Three years ago, right after the Jets
lost the AFC title game in Indianapolis, Tannenbaum approached Revis'
agents near the team bus and told them for the first time he wanted the
corner to be a Jet for life, the franchise's answer to Jeter. But that
was then and this is now.

Revis hurt his knee,
and Mike Tannenbaum became John Idzik, who's apparently telling Rex as
little as possible about the status of his favorite player. Johnson
spent too much money on the wrong guys, Mark Sanchez and Santonio Holmes among them, and now he'd rather not spend it on the right guy, the guy who did the Band-Aid deal to get to this point.


Revis should actually be rooting for a trade, hoping and praying
for one, to get to a team with a credible shot of winning him a ring.
Instead he's cut against the grain of the typical superstar athlete
stuck with a losing franchise. He's demanded a non-trade.


Johnson should take advantage of that and order Idzik to spend
his time and energy on signing Revis now, and trading Cromartie later.
And if Idzik finds in the coming weeks that Revis' agents are asking for
an unreasonable sum -- unreasonable as it would be defined by any NFL
owner driven to win a title and make the on-field product worthy of the
fans' investment in PSLs -- then go ahead and trade him.


But Woody Johnson had better make a good-faith effort to sign
Revis first. Otherwise, he'll need more than a Band-Aid to cover the
damage to his brand.

 

> http://espn.go.com/n...e-revis-not-him


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#17 JetsFanInDenver

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 03:46 PM

But what if Mark gave up some part of his salary like Gholston. Its won't be a folly on his part to give up some money this year.

 

There are two things here. There is the contract and then their is a career. For Mark a career in the NFL will be more lucrative than what he gets paid in this year by the JETS. And staying with the JETS gives Mark the best chance of having a career in the NFL. If he is released by the JETS at the end of this season his career is pretty much over. If he makes it to some teams training camp he is not their guy and may struggle to get a decent look in. But for the JETS he is their guy and they give him the best opportunity to start in the NFL.


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#18 Blackout

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 02:23 PM

baseball is so much easier...no salary caps to worry about


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Blackout, on 16 Oct 2014 - 10:28 PM, said: i HATE saying this but CJ2k is now CJ 0.5K at this point

#19 kelly

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 12:34 PM

Revis and Belichick ? No way

 

Looking at the Jets and the rest of the NFL   :

1. Cancel this Foxborough shuttle: Let's end this notion right now. If Darrelle Revis plays out his contract and becomes an unrestricted free agent, there's no way he'll end up in New England. Tom Brady
is the big fish in Beantown, and he'll remain the Patriots'
highest-paid player for as long as he's around. It would contradict the
Patriot Way to pay another player more than Saint Tom, who, in case you
missed it, took a hometown discount last week.

Combining his three-year extension with his two existing years,
Brady reportedly averages $14.5 million per year -- below what Revis is
seeking. Bill Belichick might feign interest to drive up the price (and
tweak the Jets), but he'll never undercut Brady by paying someone else
more -- especially someone who once called him a "jerk."

2. Diminishing return: If the Jets get to the point
where they decide to trade Revis (which, in my opinion, is how this
will end), they need to remember this: In 2007, they traded their
second-round pick to switch places with the Panthers and move up 11
spots in the first round, picking him 14th overall. As an asset, Revis
has appreciated over time, so the Jets shouldn't settle for anything
less than their original investment -- first- and second-round picks.

By the way, Revis was the second DB drafted that year. Can you name the first? Answer below.

3. More Revis thoughts: Trading Revis in the
offseason could cost the Jets a quality starter. How's that? Right now,
he's counting $9 million on the cap. If he's dealt, his "dead" charge is
$12 million. That extra $3 million could mean the difference between
re-signing a free agent like Mike DeVito or letting him go. In other words, you lose more than a premier cornerback if you trade Revis.The counter argument: If you wait until the end of the preseason to
trade him, the dead charge is $15 million because he will have received
$3 million in bonuses by then -- $1 million roster, $1 million workout
and $1 million reporting. The Jets would have to leave themselves enough
cap flexibility to incur an additional $6 million beyond his current
cap figure, and that won't be easy. Let's face it, it's a mess.

4. Draft nuggets: The Jets have met with the top 10
quarterback prospects, according to senior personnel exec Terry
Bradway. In an interview with the team website, he said the strength of
the QB class will be in the second and third round, although he suspects
a couple will wind up as first-rounders. Reading between the lines,
this tells me the Jets don't have any quarterbacks with a first-round
grade.

Other insights from Bradway: The best values at safety and running
back are Rounds 2 to 4. There are 12 to 14 wide receivers who can make
significant contributions as rookies. Oregon pass rusher Dion Jordan (shoulder surgery), a player linked to the Jets at No. 9, might not be ready until early training camp.

5. Crystal ball: Prediction on the early theme of free agency for the Jets -- exodus. I can easily see them losing mainstays such as DeVito, Dustin Keller, Brandon Moore and Shonn Greene, along with LaRon Landry.
Even with the bump in the cap, they're still only about $8 million
under. It'll take about $8 million for the draft and restricted-free
agent tenders, so they're really operating with no room for spending.
They have to make cuts (Tim Tebow) and restructure contracts (Santonio Holmes) to create room.

6. Austin Power: The Jets are trying to decide whether to give RT Austin Howard
the first-round tender ($2.86 million) or second-round tender ($2.02
million) as a restricted free agent. Something they should consider: The
Ravens, Howard's first team, own the last pick in the second round and
could be looking for a left tackle to replace free-agent LT Bryant McKinnie.
Howard, almost 26, would be better than any draft pick at that spot, so
it wouldn't be a shock if the Ravens explore an offer sheet.

7. Out like Flynn: A lot of folks are saying the Jets should trade for Seahawks backup QB Matt Flynn,
but he'd hardly be a sure thing. Dolphins coach Joe Philbin, formerly
Flynn's coordinator in Green Bay, passed on him last offseason. Chiefs
GM John Dorsey, formerly a Packers exec, also passed, as the Chiefs
opted to trade for Alex Smith. It tells you something about a player when the people who know him best don't want him.

8. No ordinary Joe: Ravens QB Joe Flacco
landed a six-year, $120.6 million contract, the 13th $100 million deal
in NFL history. Of the eight contracts no longer active, the biggest
actual payout was Brett Favre,
who got $54.6 million of a $100 million deal, according to ESPN Stats
& Information. Moral of the story: There's a lot of funny money in
the NFL.

9. No ordinary Joe, Part II: Three weeks ago, I had lunch with Flacco's agent, Joe Linta, for a story on another client, Stony Brook RB Miguel Maysonet.
Linta, describing his penchant for signing small-school players (Flacco
came from Delaware), admitted it's a risky way to do business. "It's
living on the edge, but I like taking the road less traveled," he said.
After his Flacco commission, Linta will be driving that road in style.

10. A poor Reid-option: Alex Smith fits Andy Reid's
West Coast offense because of his short accuracy, but let's be real
here: The Chiefs gave up too much in the trade, sending the 49ers a
second-round pick (No. 34) this year and a conditional pick in 2014.
Smith isn't that good, but it's a weak quarterback class. Plus,
the Chiefs have a poor track record for drafting passers. The last 10
quarterbacks drafted by the Chiefs never won a game for the franchise,
per ESPN Stats. Where have you gone, Len Dawson ?

Answer to the trivia question: LaRon Landry, drafted sixth overall by the Redskins.

 

> http://espn.go.com/b...elichick-no-way


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#20 Greenseed4

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 12:56 PM

Revis and Belichick ? No way

 

Looking at the Jets and the rest of the NFL   :

1. Cancel this Foxborough shuttle: 
 Bill Belichick might feign interest to drive up the price (and
tweak the Jets), 

 

If BB feign's interest, his driving the price up will have absolutely no impact whatsoever on the Jets.  At that point Revis would be a free agent deciding where to play among the other 31 teams in the league.  

2. Diminishing return: If the Jets get to the point
where they decide to trade Revis (which, in my opinion, is how this
will end), they need to remember this: In 2007, they traded their
second-round pick to switch places with the Panthers and move up 11
spots in the first round, picking him 14th overall. As an asset, Revis
has appreciated over time, so the Jets shouldn't settle for anything
less than their original investment -- first- and second-round picks.

They actually traded a 1st, a 2nd, and a 5th to move up from #25 to #14. 

3. More Revis thoughts: Trading Revis in the
offseason could cost the Jets a quality starter. How's that? Right now,
he's counting $9 million on the cap. If he's dealt, his "dead" charge is
$12 million. That extra $3 million could mean the difference between
re-signing a free agent like Mike DeVito or letting him go. 

 

The idea would be to trade him for more than one draft pick, or possibly a pick and player(s) type situation.  Lets say we can land 2 second round picks (the floor of his trade value, IMO) then we are replacing ONE starter (Revis) with TWO potential starters.  It's not like we're trading him for no return. 


4. Draft nuggets: The Jets have met with the top 10
quarterback prospects, according to senior personnel exec Terry
Bradway. In an interview with the team website, he said the strength of
the QB class will be in the second and third round, although he suspects
a couple will wind up as first-rounders. Reading between the lines,
this tells me the Jets don't have any quarterbacks with a first-round
grade.
Hopefully they continue reading between those lines, and make the connection that if you don't have a first-round grade on a QB, then that player is unlikely to make significant contributions to a team without significant development.  If we're going to roll the dice on a player, do so in the 5th round and beyond. Rounds 2-4 can unearth some gems, and at the very least provide quality depth. 


5. Crystal ball: Prediction on the early theme of free agency for the Jets -- exodus. I can easily see them losing mainstays such as DeVito, Dustin Keller, Brandon Moore and Shonn Greene, along with LaRon Landry.

 

Spoiler alert: I predict we'll keep at least one of the above...and why no mention of Slauson?


6. Austin Power: The Jets are trying to decide whether to give RT Austin Howard
the first-round tender ($2.86 million) or second-round tender ($2.02
million) as a restricted free agent. Something they should consider: The
Ravens, Howard's first team, own the last pick in the second round and
could be looking for a left tackle to replace free-agent LT Bryant McKinnie.
Howard, almost 26, would be better than any draft pick at that spot, so
it wouldn't be a shock if the Ravens explore an offer sheet.

 

They could tag him with the ROFR tag (right of first refusal tag) for under $1.5M.  This lets him gauge his value, and allows us to save some bucks if he doesn't get any nibbles. 



7. Out like Flynn: A lot of folks are saying the Jets should trade for Seahawks backup QB Matt Flynn,
but he'd hardly be a sure thing. Dolphins coach Joe Philbin, formerly
Flynn's coordinator in Green Bay, passed on him last offseason. Chiefs
GM John Dorsey, formerly a Packers exec, also passed, as the Chiefs
opted to trade for Alex Smith. It tells you something about a player when the people who know him best don't want him.

 

Let's face it, Alex Smith has actually experience in the league.  Before his injury Smith was setting all-time records for completion pct...and I thought Flynn was brought in to Miami, and lost in the Manning shuffle. It's not like he was completely dissed.  

8. No ordinary Joe: Ravens QB Joe Flacco
landed a six-year, $120.6 million contract, the 13th $100 million deal
in NFL history. Of the eight contracts no longer active, the biggest
actual payout was Brett Favre,
who got $54.6 million of a $100 million deal, according to ESPN Stats
& Information. Moral of the story: There's a lot of funny money in
the NFL.

 

I wish we could pay Revis some funny money. 
 

 

Good job Kelly, keep em coming! :love0038:


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#21 kelly

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 03:45 PM

Source : Howard receives 2nd-round tender
 

Right tackle Austin Howard, a restricted free agent, received a

second-round tender from the Jets, according to a league source.


The tender is worth $2.02 million for one year. If the Jets decline
to match an offer sheet -- they have the right of first refusal --
they'd receive a second-round draft pick as compensation.

The Jets' other options were a first-round tender ($2.8 million) or
the low tender ($1.32 million), the latter of which includes no
draft-pick compensation. If they had opted for the low tender, the Jets
would've invited a feeding frenzy.

Howard, a virtual unknown a year ago, won the right-tackle job in
training camp and started every game, replacing the unpopular
Wayne Hunter. The Jets signed Howard off the Ravens' practice
squad in 2011. Interestingly, the Ravens could be in the market
for a tackle and they hold the final pick in the second round.

Howard was originally an undrafted free agent out of Northern Iowa.
 

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#22 kelly

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 02:12 PM

A hilariously ironic scene unfolded Monday at an NFL-organized event at Rockefeller Center.

The noisy and brash Jets were quiet. The understated and old-school Giants were loud.

Woody Johnson, owner of the big-top Jets, absolutely refused to answer any questions

about the future of Darrelle Revis.Reporters badgered him, but he refused to give up

anything during theinterrogation. You half-wondered if people were watching on the other
side of a two-way mirror.

Nearby, Giants co-owner John Mara talked and talked about Victor Cruz,
a restricted free agent. It was a clear case of public negotiating,
Mara saying how much they'd love to have him but claiming there's a
limit to how much they're willing to pay.

A role reversal for our two local teams.

Why have the Jets opted for the silent approach ?  Some might say it's
an attempt to "smoke out" Revis' hard-line agents, but I think it has
more to do with the Jets having no interest in talking to Revis about a
contract extension. I wrote this a few weeks ago, and I'll write it
again: There's no chance that Johnson will sign Revis to a new deal.
None. They will trade their best player, and it's only a matter of when.

It would be bad business for the Jets to trade Revis without so much
as a contract discussion with the agents. Is that any way to run a
franchise? As of Monday night, the Jets hadn't reached out to the
agents, according to league sources. In theory, they'll have to give
them permission to negotiate a contract with the team that steps up and
agrees to trade for him, meeting the Jets' compensation demands.

Pro Football Talk reported Monday night that the Jets have a "good"
offer on the table for Revis. It's hard to imagine a team coming to the
table this quickly, considering Revis is only five months removed from
ACL surgery. Be careful, there's a lot of smoke this time of year. But
if the Jets do have a good offer, they should wait because they should
be able to do better as Revis gets healthier. Maybe a bidding war
emerges before the draft.

Revis has a de facto no-trade clause because any team willing to
trade for him likely will want to negotiate a long-term contract, and
the Revis camp will drive a hard bargain. Without a long-term deal,
Revis could be a one-year rental, and it's hard to imagine a team
surrendering a lucrative compensation package to the Jets without having
a commitment from Revis beyond 2013. If the Jets let him go without
receiving at least a first-round pick, there should be an investigation.

The Bucs make a lot of sense as a possible destination. They need a
cornerback, they have more than $30 million in cap room and they've
negotiated big deals with Revis' agents in the past -- i.e. Vincent Jackson.

Coach Greg Schiano, the former Rutgers coach, is familiar with Revis

from his Big East days.

On Monday, Johnson said he'd field Revis-related questions next week
at the league meetings. Who knows ? By then, Revis could be gone.

 

> http://espn.go.com/b...ave-like-giants


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#23 kelly

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 08:57 AM


Cro reworks deal, not going anywhere
 

For those clinging to the hope the Jets would trade CB Antonio Cromartie and use

the money to re-sign Darrelle Revis ... well, you can forget about that.

Cromartie is untradable now because he restructured his contract,
according to NFLPA records posted Tuesday night. He was a prime
candidate because of a $2.3 million roster bonus due Wednesday.

It appears he didn't lose any money in the restructuring. He was due
to make a $7 million base salary plus the roster bonus, a total of $9.3
million. His base pay dropped to $840,000, the roster bonus was
eliminated and he will receive the difference in the form of an $8.5
million signing bonus that will be pro-rated over the next two years. It
drops his cap charge to $6.25 million, a savings of about $4.2 million.

There's a down side to this credit-card approach; it inflates
Cromartie's 2014 cap number to $15 million, including a $5 million
roster bonus. It'll force the two sides to the bargaining table because
there's little chance of them doling out that kind of bonus in the final
year of a contract.

Holmes apparently took a straight pay cut, although it's possible he
can recoup some money with incentives. His base salary was reduced from
$11 million to $7.5 million, the amount that was guaranteed in the
original contract. Basically, his non-guaranteed salary ($3.5 million)
was slashed.

By adjusting the Holmes and Cromartie contracts, the Jets created
about $7.7 million in cap space. This puts them about $16 million under
the cap. C Nick Mangold is due a $3 million roster bonus Wednesday,

but his contract remains untouched. Revis is due a $1 million roster

bonus on Saturday.

In case you're wondering, David Garrard's contract is one year for a

total of $1.1 million.

 

> http://espn.go.com/b...-going-anywhere

 


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#24 kelly

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 09:17 AM

Day 1 recap : Defense takes a couple of hits
 

A few takeaways on Day 1 of free agency:


1. SLIM PICKINGS: To use an old Bill Parcells
expression, the Jets' defense resembles a turkey carcass the day after
Thanksgiving. There's not much left. (I'm pretty sure Parcells used the
turkey analogy to describe a draft board after the first few rounds.)
They lost DT Mike DeVito to the Chiefs (three years, $12.6 million) and they
released NT Sione Po'uha($3.8 million cap savings). There goes their two
best interior linemen. Rex Ryan must be moping around the office because
his defense is in the process of being gutted.Sione Po'uha spent eight
years with the Jets.
 
Get this : They have only five defensive players under contract that
started last year -- three corners (Darrelle Revis, Antonio Cromartie and
Kyle Wilson), one linebacker (David Harris) and one lineman
(Muhammad Wilkerson).And Revis could be on his way out. This is a
major rebuilding project for Ryan and new coordinator Dennis Thurman,
who will be leaning heavily on young players such as Quinton Coples,
Kenrick Ellis, Demario Davis and Ricky Sapp to step into prominent roles.

2. A HOLMES HAIRCUT: As expected, the Jets and Santonio Holmes
agreed on a restructured contract that will keep him with the team in
2013. The new deal hasn't been submitted yet, but you can bet his base
salary will be lower than the original $11 million. Chances are, they
saved about $2 million to $3 million by getting Holmes to re-work his
deal. They could've released him if he refused, but that would've been a
tough one to swallow. They owe him $7.5 million guaranteed and the cap
hit would've been $11.25 million.

3. TWO GOOD MEN -- GONE: The locker room lost two
veteran leaders in Po'uha and DeVito, close friends who mentored the
young linemen. Po'uha and DeVito are blue-collar types whose
professionalism permeated the defensive-line room. I remember the 2011
lockout, when they organized informal workouts for the D-line at a local
high school. The Jets don't have enough guys like that in the locker
room; their intangibles will be missed. How's this for irony? They said
goodbye to a couple of class acts on the same day in which they a found a
way to retain Holmes, a problem child who poisoned the team chemistry
in 2011.

4. RETURN ENGAGEMENT?: Some people have asked
whether the Jets might re-sign Po'uha. I don't see that happening. His
back issue from last season is still causing problems, and his No. 1
priority should be getting healthy so he can enjoy a rich life after
football.

5. BARGAIN HUNTING: As expected, the Jets didn't
fly out of the free-agent gate, throwing around wads of money. Far from
it. They set up visits with at least two players, neither of whom is a
household name -- Rams WR Brandon Gibson and Raiders RB
Mike Goodson. If they don't sign Gibson, they could turn to Browns
WR Mohamed Massaquoi.This demonstrates the team's approach to
free agency. They're lookingfor young, relatively inexpensive players
with some upside, sleeper types that showed glimpses in backup roles.
The Jets could chase some name vets down the road, when their
asking prices drop. This is a buyer's market, and GM John Idzik will be
patient.

6. FISH FRENZY: The Dolphins won the day, landing WR Mike Wallace
and LB Dannell Ellerbe. They signed a $13 million-a-year receiver and
here are the Jets, possibly getting ready to send Revis away in a trade.
Should the Jets beworried ? Yes and no. In their three most recent games
against the Steelers, they used Cromartie on Wallace -- speed vs. speed.
Wallace's three-game totals were ordinary: 13 catches, 182 yards and
one TD.
Here's the problem : The Dolphins retained WR Brian Hartline,
whom Cromartie usually covers -- length vs. length. If Revis is gone,
Cromartie won't be able to cover them both, obviously. One interesting
note on Wallace: He's had only two 100-yard performances in his last 24
games.

7. LOOKING AT DAY 2: S LaRon Landry
could be the next to fall, as he's scheduled to visit the Colts, Cards,
Lions and 49ers. He could sign a deal anywhere along his tour. The Jets
are out of it. It was a quiet first day for RG Brandon Moore and TE
Dustin Keller, but they could start to attract more interest. Ditto,
 

 


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#25 kelly

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 09:35 AM

Get ready to lose Keller, Greene, too
 
The Rex-odus will continue.

Tight end Dustin Keller and running back Shonn Greene,
mainstays on the Jets' offense, are scheduled to visit Wednesday with
the Dolphins and Titans, respectively, sources confirmed. The Jets
expect to lose both players, sources said.

On Tuesday, they tried to re-sign DT Mike DeVito, but he signed
a three-year, $12.6 million contract with the Jets. They also cut
popular NT Sione Po'uha, who still is battling a back injury. The
Jets also expect to lose Pro Bowl safety LaRon Landry, who has
set up visits with several teams.

Oh, and did we mention they're trying to trade star CB Darrelle Revis ?

The Dolphins are interested in Keller after losing out on former Titans
TE Jared Cook, who signed with the Rams. It's interesting that the Rams,
with former Jets offensive coordinatorator Brian Schottenheimer running
the O, preferred Cook over Keller.

The Titans see Greene as a possible between-the-tackles complement
to Chris Johnson.

Meanwhile, the Jets are set to host WR Brandon Gibson
on Wednesday for a free-agent visit. He was a full-time player for the
Rams last season, catching 51 passes for 691 yards and five touchdowns.
He played in 73 percent of the Rams' offensive snaps, according to
ProFootballFocus.com.

Suddenly, Gibson is one of the "hot" second-tier free agents. The
Dolphins are also showing interest, but they won't pay much after
spending a combined $18 million a year for Mike Wallace and Brian Hartline.
 

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