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D'Brick signs D'Extension!!!


Jetsfan1015
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Just the opposite in my opinion. It is a one on one stat where said OL gets beat by his blocking assignment.

Seems pretty simple to me.

It's like a pass defended, we have no problem quoting that stat, but it doesn't explain if he's getting safety help or the receiver tripped. It's not fair to over analyze just because you or whoever does not like the resulting stat.

So much goes into a sack or a interception but those are welcomed with open arms. The LB providing the pressure doesn't get a 1/2 pass defended stat because he rushed the QB.

No it isn't. That's the problem.

A pass defended is usually referring to passes deflected, which can be seen and tallied. Sacks allowed is alot more vague than that.

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I think it was a smart signing by the Jets as they had to start somewhere locking up some of their players. I doubt it buys the team any good faith in the locker room and still think Revis and Mangold are going to hold out of training camp. I think the Leon injury and past suspect contract negotiations have left a foul taste in the player's mouth.

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I don't think it's used by teams at all for any purpose. If it was would the Jets have just given an LT who is middle to bottom of the pack in sacks allowed more guaranteed money than has ever been paid to a LT?

I think this particular stat has one audience and one audience only - stat geeks.

The teams do use it, but they take into account their own internal information on the player and they compare it with similar players. For example Brick was credited with allowing those unblocked sacks to Freeny this year. You cant expect them to not blame that on him, but the Jets may take that out of their own evaluation because they know what the scheme should have been there. But in general the comparisons are valid because everyone is judged the same and its crazy to think the criteria only negatively effects Ferguson.

One of the cap folks told me that there are a few metrics they use to try to value the Lt position. One is sacks allowed. Holds and false starts per game are also looked at as are pressures. They also use rushing yards to that side of the field. But they also take into account their own offenses and the tendencies of the QB on the teams when they make the decision.

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The teams do use it, but they take into account their own internal information on the player and they compare it with similar players. For example Brick was credited with allowing those unblocked sacks to Freeny this year. You cant expect them to not blame that on him, but the Jets may take that out of their own evaluation because they know what the scheme should have been there. But in general the comparisons are valid because everyone is judged the same and its crazy to think the criteria only negatively effects Ferguson.

One of the cap folks told me that there are a few metrics they use to try to value the Lt position. One is sacks allowed. Holds and false starts per game are also looked at as are pressures. They also use rushing yards to that side of the field. But they also take into account their own offenses and the tendencies of the QB on the teams when they make the decision.

Thank you for the non smart-ass direct answer to my question Jason, it only took almost half a decade for someone to respond. I only take issue with the bolded part of your post. I don't see anywhere that I suggested that the criteria only negatively effects one player. I think the entire statistic is flawed and meaningless because it is impossible to accurately quantify it unless you are somehow privy to information the stat keepers couldn't possibly be privy to.

If sacks allowed is a metric used in evaluating a TEs monetary worth, one would assume the number used is one based on film study done by the team who really knows who is responsible because they know the information necessary to make an accurate assessment and not the ridiculous number put forward publicly by Stats Inc.

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I cant see us keeping Cromartie, to be honest. If he gets anywhere near what he is capable of doing this season...He will command at least that $7mil/year. With Revis (hopefully) and Wilson both locked up long term after the season, I cant imagine a scenario where we see keeping Cro is a bigger need than keeping Harris. Especially considering the likelihood that neither Taylor or Ellis will be on the team after this season, and Jenkins isn't getting any younger in the middle either. Harris is young and reliable in the middle of the field. I really dont see us letting him walk.

We shall see. If Cromartie doesn't improve upon his 2008-2009 play it's a moot point.

If he returns to the form he displayed 3 years ago (and only adds to that due to NFL experience he didn't have then, the decision to let him go won't be so easy (and Wilson's maturity will certainly play into it). A team's second All-Pro level CB is more difficult to replace than a second All-Pro level ILB. It's just easier to swap out 1 of 2 starting ILB'ers with a rookie or less-heralded player than 1 of 2 starting CB's. JMO anyway.

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G.O.B. is no stat geek. He actually had "Sacks Allowed" tattooed on his palm in 1994.

:rl:

The teams do use it, but they take into account their own internal information on the player and they compare it with similar players. For example Brick was credited with allowing those unblocked sacks to Freeny this year. You cant expect them to not blame that on him, but the Jets may take that out of their own evaluation because they know what the scheme should have been there. But in general the comparisons are valid because everyone is judged the same and its crazy to think the criteria only negatively effects Ferguson.

One of the cap folks told me that there are a few metrics they use to try to value the Lt position. One is sacks allowed. Holds and false starts per game are also looked at as are pressures. They also use rushing yards to that side of the field. But they also take into account their own offenses and the tendencies of the QB on the teams when they make the decision.

You called Brick's contract almost to the cent and part of your analysis included "sacks allowed per game." I think the results speak for themselves.

For everyone else, read this article and you'll think it was written AFTER the extension was signed.

http://nyjetscap.com/Fergusoncontract.html

Also, at most a LT gives up what 8 sacks a year at most? Not that hard to pull the tape on those 8 and see whether the evaluator agrees with the assessment. Hell, I'm sure they pull a tape of every sack allowed by the team when evaluating a lineman's pass protection abilities. This is a big investment for teams, they're going to do their DD.

Edited by jgb
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Thank you for the non smart-ass direct answer to my question Jason, it only took almost half a decade for someone to respond. I only take issue with the bolded part of your post. I don't see anywhere that I suggested that the criteria only negatively effects one player. I think the entire statistic is flawed and meaningless because it is impossible to accurately quantify it unless you are somehow privy to information the stat keepers couldn't possibly be privy to.

If sacks allowed is a metric used in evaluating a TEs monetary worth, one would assume the number used is one based on film study done by the team who really knows who is responsible because they know the information necessary to make an accurate assessment and not the ridiculous number put forward publicly by Stats Inc.

The bolded part wasnt really reflected at your comments Kleck just a general thought that is always throws out regarding Brick when Jets fans seemed to always have some excuse for his high sack totals. I think fans were too fast to dismiss that, though at the same time they somehow religiously bought into the FO talk of him being the worst run blocking tackle in the league, which amazingly disappeared once it was evident that the problems were as much scheme and teammates as it was him.

I think the teams use Stats as a guideline. The know the number is going to be flawed somewhat and they take that into account when they evaluate the tapes. But scheme is so important in the NFL that I believe its a big reason why more and more teams simply sign their own free agents to big deals rather than spend wildly in free agency. You are much more knowledgeable on your own talent than anyone else out there. The Jets know every flaw in every stat category involving Brick because they know first hand what he does and does not do. They have a 100% accurate grade of him on a weekly basis. They cant say that about any other player in the league.

I think that is why free agency in the NFL usually ends up being much ado about nothing with 90% of the talent. The Jets whiffed on Faneca, though he did serve a purpose, and probably on Pace too. There is a reason why the home teams showed almost no interest in the players. The better signings the Jets have made seem to be the players that they have more familiarity with. Mangini had a history with Woody. Ryan had a history with Scott and Leonhard. Ryan is familiar with Holmes and Edwards from all his years in that division. Someone told me that Faneca was never really a Ryan guy. If that is true, my guess is that stems from the fact that he felt his defense could beat him up when they were in the same division.

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Just the opposite in my opinion. It is a one on one stat where said OL gets beat by his blocking assignment.

Seems pretty simple to me.

It's like a pass defended, we have no problem quoting that stat, but it doesn't explain if he's getting safety help or the receiver tripped. It's not fair to over analyze just because you or whoever does not like the resulting stat.

So much goes into a sack or a interception but those are welcomed with open arms. The LB providing the pressure doesn't get a 1/2 pass defended stat because he rushed the QB.

Pass defended means the defender touched the ball and knocked it away. Also called pass breakups or PBUs.

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