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Could DeFilippo Be The OC In Waiting???


KRL
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With Gailey being up there in age and DeFilippo so young
I wonder if Bowles has this in mind if he comes on board?
Gailey could be the OC for a year and install the spread and then
DeFilippo could take over.  He has an impressive resume and reputation:
 
 
Resume
 
 
 
Reputation
 
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i could buy it.  with all due respect to Chan and while I'm starting to get pretty optimistic about him as our OC, he has been out of football for 2 years and is getting old.  not too crazy to think that DeFilippo is being brought in as a coach in waiting.

Do u know who Ron Earhardt is/was ?

Do you know how old he was when he was OC of the Jints

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I was listening to a podcast last night and they mentioned something similar. You never know. What I can say is that Bowles are picking people who has had success. Derek Carr looked like he should have been the first QB off the board. If Bowles is thinking that far ahead then it just shows how smart this guy is. Let the players know your staff and hire from within so there's no hiccup during the transition a couple years from now. 

 

Though there is no proof that this is accurate I will give Bowles the credit any damn way! 

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It's an interesting thought but with a guy like lebeau being in his late seventies and still coaching chan might have more left in the tank than we think. I wonder if he retired because he wanted to or because the offers stopped rolling in. He may have been taking paid years off after being fired as a head coach too.

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With Gailey being up there in age and DeFilippo so young
I wonder if Bowles has this in mind if he comes on board?
Gailey could be the OC for a year and install the spread and then
DeFilippo could take over.  He has an impressive resume and reputation:
 
 
Resume
 
 
 
Reputation
 

 

Brilliant!! Bowles/Maccagnan have already prepared the sacrificial lamb(Gailey) for when the offense screws everything up again.

Then DiFilipo comes in after having a year to coach up the young QB(Marriota/Winston/Petty) as OC

It's called "Hedging your Bets" LOL

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With Gailey being up there in age and DeFilippo so young

I wonder if Bowles has this in mind if he comes on board?

Gailey could be the OC for a year and install the spread and then

DeFilippo could take over.  He has an impressive resume and reputation:

 

 

Resume

 

http://www.raiders.com/team/coaches/john-defilippo/ecdec84f-989e-4b76-a7bf-0fbbdabbde75

 

 

Reputation

 

http://www.cleveland.com/browns/index.ssf/2014/01/browns_oc_candidate_john_defil.html

Hopefully that's the case that's how guys like Macadoo and Lazor moved up while grooming young QB's. Did we hire DeFilippo yet.

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i could buy it.  with all due respect to Chan and while I'm starting to get pretty optimistic about him as our OC, he has been out of football for 2 years and is getting old.  not too crazy to think that DeFilippo is being brought in as a coach in waiting.

That's what I was thinking.  Chan might only be here 1-2 years;  then the new QB coach takes over--  that's thinking forward, and

very creatively.  Unusual for the Jets.!      DeFilippo did excellent work with Derek Carr.

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i could buy it. with all due respect to Chan and while I'm starting to get pretty optimistic about him as our OC, he has been out of football for 2 years and is getting old. not too crazy to think that DeFilippo is being brought in as a coach in waiting.

Gailey born '52. Pete Carroll born '51.

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I felt that this one was pretty awesome. We'd be a fool to give up on Geno Smith. Articles like this shows me why Gailey gets production from his QB's. 

 

 

Chan Gailey's Offense: The Spread

By John B on Jan 17 2015, 12:50p 38 

usa-today-6891450.0.jpg
Timothy T. Ludwig-USA TODAY Spor
 
 

This will be the first installment in an I don't know how many part series over the course of the offseason taking a look at some of the concepts in Chan Gailey's offense.

Chan Gailey in his last stop in Buffalo embraced a spread offense. What is a spread offense? It's a term you hear a lot. There are many different varieties, but what it ultimately means is the offense uses a lot of formations with players lined up spread across the entire field rather than one that keeps its players in the same general area before the snap.

Gailey has used a number of different offensive styles in his years, but his time in Buffalo indicates he has adapted to the new age reliance on the spread. Why do I say that? In his final season with the Bills, no team had a higher percentage of plays with 3 or more receivers and no team ran a higher percentage of plays with an empty backfield. Gailey's three most productive receivers that year were Stevie Johnson, Donald Jones, and T.J. Graham. This seems to indicate Gailey's philosophy focusing on the spread than him using it because of personnel.

spread.0.JPG

So what are the advantages to going heavy with a spread offense?

The biggest one is probably spacing. The less defenders there are in an area, the better things are for the offense. Why? Because more defenders means more players capable of making a tackle. If you have three guys in an area, and guy one misses, two more will be there to clean up. By stretching the defense out horizontally over the entire field, it puts less defenders into the area no matter where the ball goes.

For a visual representation, look at the high tech GGN graphics below.

spreadgraphic1.0.JPG

spreadgraphic2.0.JPG

 

In these graphics, X's are offensive players. The red X is the player with the ball. O's are defensive players.

In the top graphic, the three offensive players are all in the same area. Each is covered by one defensive player. Since the offensive players are in the same area, the defensive players are too. There are three players capable of making the tackle. In the bottom graphic, the offensive players are spread into different areas. The defensive players are too. Now there is only one player who can tackle the ball handler. A missed tackle could mean a big play.

This has an impact in the passing game, but it does in the run game too. With receivers spread out across the field, there are less players in the box.

spreadrun1.0.JPG

spreadrun2.0.JPG

Look at the top picture out of a spread formation against the bottom in a traditional I formation with a tight end. The top has five combined defensive linemen and linebackers close to the line. The bottom has seven. The other team has to either move linebackers and linemen away or replace them with backup defensive backs.

The offense does lose two blockers, a tight end and a fullback, but that can be a winning trade for a team without strong blockers in those positions like the Jets currently. Instead of having those players block, their redeployment eliminates original tacklers. For a back like Ivory, having less big guys to deal with is probably an advantage anyway. One missed tackle, and he can run a long way.

That thing about forcing the defense to take starting linebackers and linemen off the field and replacing them with defensive backs is something to consider on any play. You presumably weaken a defense when you force it to play backups instead of starters.

All of these are potential advantages to using spread formations heavily, but the biggest one might be the manner in which they make the lives of the quarterback easy.

Now think about passing plays and use the same two pictures above. By forcing more defenders away from the snap, you have limited the blitz possibilities. Less guys lined up near the ball mean less potential blitzers and blitz combinations.

There's a reason there are not many men on this planet capable of playing the position effectively in the NFL. A quarterback has to synthesize a ton of information immediately after the snap. Within three seconds give or take, he has determine how many players are blitzing, what the coverage looks like underneath, how many defenders are over the top, and how his current playcall meshes with that.

Spreading the defense out can help the quarterback determine at least some of this before the snap and leave less on his plate after the snap.

spread2.0.JPG

If you have five guys split wide and somebody not lined up against all of them, you can guess the coverage is some sort of zone.

gronk5.0.jpg

If you have a tight end or back who is a particularly adept receiver, you can split him wide and see whether the defense will tip you presnap. This one happened to the Jets. It is Rob Gronkowski. Before the snap, Calvin Pryor is lined up across from him. There aren't many reasons a safety would be out wide like that across from a tight end if he is not going to be in man coverage. In this case, Tom Brady could see the coverage. Even more, he could see that this man coverage had given him a mismatch, Pryor vs. Gronkowski, so he could attack it. Right off the snap, he fired for a touchdown.

Does this sound like a way to use Jace Amaro? I think it might be.

There are plenty of things to discuss with Chan Gailey's offense. The first impacts the play before the snap.

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