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OUR new head coach is far more than just a coach...


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Literally don't care a whit about any of that.   Just coach the team to wins.   Also, "Muslim" isn't a race. My Turkish wife laughed at the "Muslim American" thing. She said, "He's

"Hey babe, are you going to shovel the sidewalk?" "Be down in a sec! Just doing some race science with my internet sports friends!"

Ugh, who cares. I don’t like to be classified as a bi racial, amazingly good looking, ladies man. I’m just a man damnit. 

I don't particularly care what his ethnicity or religion is. How about this as a first - the first coach to coach the Jets in a Super Bowl in this century? How is that for firsts?

If he gets us there and even better wins, I don't care if he is a flat-earth conspirator.

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14 hours ago, The Crusher said:

Please please please let him be a ninja too. That would rock. 

agreed !   😎..

rs_400x256-160208095809-ninja_turtles_pi

... i Luv you guys ! !   😘

 

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By law, he is definitely considered Caucasian, as Semites are considered Caucasian. Also, he is Lebanese, and many Lebanese do not even consider themselves Arabs. They speak Arabic, but only due to diffusion. Before they spoke Arabic, they spoke Aramaic — the language of the Middle East before Islam. A lot of genetic research has shown that Lebanese are more related to the Canaanite peoples — Phoenicians — than they are to Arabs. 
https://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-canaanite-lebanese-genetics-20170727-story.html   
The narrative surrounding his “minority status” seems to be related to his religion, which makes some sense.


Great info and history, only part I contest is the end. His religion does not make him a minority, it actually makes him the majority as there are more muslims in the world than any other religion. He’s only “minority” in the US because well... ‘Merica!


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On 1/18/2021 at 6:54 PM, docdhc said:

Not trying to be controversial but are people of Arab descent considered people of color or caucasian?  How does the NFL define a minority hire now that there are draft compensation bonuses for having a minority assistant coach leaving and getting a head coaching job?

They are considered Asian

 

The Middle East is Southwest Asia

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On 1/25/2021 at 7:28 PM, bostonmajet said:

I don't particularly care what his ethnicity or religion is. How about this as a first - the first coach to coach the Jets in a Super Bowl in this century? How is that for firsts?

If he gets us there and even better wins, I don't care if he is a flat-earth conspirator.

agreed !  😎

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Rich Cimini   ESPN Staff Writer 

Robert Saleh filled another vacancy on his staff, hiring Mike Rutenberg as the linebackers coach. (NFL Network.) Rutenberg is yet another ex-49ers assistant; he was their passing-game specialist on defense. This means Saleh has all his coordinators and position coaches in place.

>     https://www.espn.com/nfl/team/_/name/nyj/new-york-jets

 

~ ~  ALL set !  😎.. Looks good... so far   😉

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On 1/18/2021 at 3:21 PM, Integrity28 said:

Why am I not surprised that white guys on MLK day are all “just do teh football” in response to a first-time Muslim American feel good story?

No Way Romano GIF by TV Land

This was a nice well mannered thread about Saleh and what he is until you came and started the race baiting. Again.

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On 1/18/2021 at 3:45 PM, David Harris said:

Ok.  Like why 15000 years ago after crossing the Bering Straight land bridge would you stop in cold Alaska?  It's just lazy.  their cousins went on down to where the abundant Buffalo were in the Great Plains and the smart ones kept going down to Cancun 

They probably walked through all that misery, over the straight, into more misery that seemed never ending and just said f it

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32 minutes ago, HighPitch said:

This was a nice well mannered thread about Saleh and what he is until you came and started the race baiting. Again.

That’s not race baiting, jerkoff.

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2 hours ago, Integrity28 said:

That’s not race baiting, jerkoff.

Yes it is .

100%

It was a civil and interesting discussion about race, history, religion and what makes one fall into certain categories discussed by adults with a positive vibe and you, one of the race baiters of JN, had to sour it with your bull.

 

You are racist. It's always on YOUR MIND. 

 

ps no need for a personal attack either. figure it out already

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Let's start in the living room of Robert Saleh's parents' home in Dearborn, Michigan.

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, Saleh and his family sat in front of the TV, horrified by the images they saw on CNN. His mother was crying. His sisters were crying. His father, Sam, refused to believe the grisly scene at the World Trade Center in New York City.Maybe the restaurant atop the north tower was on fire, Sam thought. Maybe it was a bogus report or trick photography by a twisted producer. That was his paternal hope. His body felt numb.With Robert's older brother, David, working on the 61st floor of the south tower, their minds soon began racing to bad places. Robert was motionless on the sofa, his eyes stuck on the screen. He was 22 years old, a former college football player starting a career in the financial world -- 19 years before he would be named head coach of the New York Jets.

"He barely said two words, but you could see he had anxiety in his face," Sam said. "You could see the anxiety and fear that he might have lost a brother. Right then and there was the turning point for Robert. He said, 'You know what? I'm going to live my life. I'm going to do something that will make me happy.' That might have turned his life."His brother made it out alive following the terrorist attacks, but Robert bottled up those emotions for another five months. No one knew how he felt until Feb. 4, 2002, the morning after the New England Patriots stunned the St. Louis Rams in Super Bowl XXXVI. Sitting in his work cubicle at the Comerica Bank offices in Detroit, Robert called David with some personal news. He was sobbing uncontrollably as he made the call.Now let's go to the Jets' training facility in Florham Park, New Jersey.

Last Thursday, Robert was introduced as the 18th full-time coach in Jets history, culminating a journey from the bottom of one profession (financial credit analyst) to the pinnacle of another. Instead of a lavish news conference with family and friends, it was done via Zoom with Jets CEO Christopher Johnson and general manager Joe Douglas. The virtual introduction had a detached feel to it -- welcome to 2021 -- but the moment lost no significance.Robert was seated in a room 32 miles due west of lower Manhattan, home of the former twin towers. One of the darkest days in American history -- the 9/11 terrorist attacks -- had altered the course of his life and countless others. Now here he was, the grandson of Lebanese immigrants and the first Muslim head coach in NFL history, throwing his arms around the city and the franchise."Going through my brother's experience and the tragedy that he experienced, being able to self-reflect on what I was doing at that moment and realizing that I had a passion for football, really triggered this whole thing," Robert said.

In Saleh, 41, the Jets get a man with many sides. He's a fist-pumping, high-fiving, people-loving coach who wears a bracelet that reads "Extreme violence." He's 240 pounds with less than 10% body fat; he looks like he could suit up at linebacker. He's also a deep-thinking, chess-playing, child-doting dad of six (with a seventh due in April).Saleh crisscrossed the country as an NFL assistant, going from the Houston Texans to the Seattle Seahawks to the Jacksonville Jaguars to the San Francisco 49ers. He won a Super Bowl ring (Seattle, 2013 season) and endured the misery of losing (two 3-13 years in Jacksonville), so he has seen it all in a relatively short time."When he was our linebacker coach, we would say, 'He's not going to be here for very long,'" former Jaguars linebacker Paul Posluszny said. "He has that type of personality and that type of presence that you knew he was going to be in a leadership role."

After graduating from Northern Michigan in 2002, Saleh seemed more likely to become a bank president than an NFL head coach.He landed a job with Comerica Bank, making $800 a week to evaluate loan applications in an antiseptic office space. He missed football. He grew up in a football family. His father was a star middle linebacker at Fordson High School in Dearborn, where Robert and his brother, uncles and cousins also played. His dad was good enough to play at Eastern Michigan, earning a tryout with the Chicago Bears, but a serious knee injury prevented Sam from fulfilling his potential.

From one generation to the next, the Salehs played the same way."On the football field, he was a typical Saleh," former Fordson coach Jeff Stergalas said of Robert. "He's going to hit you."Robert, an all-conference tight end at Northern Michigan, opted for the 9-to-5 life because he knew he wasn't good enough to pursue the NFL as a player. There was no shame in that; he had a college degree and a promising job in finance. His family was proud of him, and why not?His paternal grandfather, Albert, was born in Lebanon and had lived a hard life, often holding down two jobs. For a two-year stretch, he worked shifts at Ford Motor Co. and General Motors. He moonlighted as a door-to-door salesman in downtown Detroit, selling enough household products in a low-income area to buy a furniture store. He never learned how to read or write English. His idea of corporate finance was doing business out of his station wagon.And now his grandson was starting a jacket-and-tie job in a downtown office. Robert was standing on the shoulders of his grandfather and father, who worked construction, coached youth sports and was a pillar in Dearborn's large and tightly knit Arab American community. This was an inspiring success story.

Except Robert hated his job. The realization hit him on 9/11.

'I have to be on the football field'

David Saleh arrived in Manhattan on Sept. 6, 2001, to begin a one-month training program as a financial adviser for Morgan Stanley. After a weekend of fun in the Big Apple, he reported to work on Sept. 10. On his second day in the office, he took a break around 8:30 a.m. and savored the view from the 61st floor. He saw the Statue of Liberty and a blue harbor speckled with ships. It was a postcard morning until a ball of fire zoomed past the window, jolting him back a step."It was all slow motion to me," David said. "I couldn't even register what was happening."David knew enough to get the hell out of there. He found the stairwell and started to walk down, passing firefighters at the 11th floor. The concerned, pasty look on one firefighter's face is burned into his memory. He still wonders if any of those brave souls who marched into the inferno made it out alive.When David reached the street, he started running and kept running for seven blocks, not knowing the north tower had been struck by a plane. There was hysteria in the streets as people watched the towers eventually collapse. The scene reminded him of the movie "Independence Day."

In Michigan, his panicked loved ones tried desperately to reach him.

"Swear to god, you never want to hear your mom's voice when she thinks you might be dead," David said. "Oh boy, just hearing her on the voicemail was horrible."David stopped at a convenience store and called home (the owner charged him $20), letting his frightened family know he was OK. He made his way to White Plains, just north of the city, where he obtained a rented car through a friend of his dad's. He drove home to Michigan, pulling over in Pennsylvania because of a trauma-induced anxiety attack.Robert was happy to have his big brother home, but that day shook him so much that he reexamined his own life and career goals. He decided to follow his heart, giving up finance for football. It took guts, but it also was gut-wrenching."He called me up, profusely crying, in complete tears," David said. "He had a little breakdown. He said, 'I have to be on the football field.'"

Robert drove home and broke the news to his father."When he walked in the house, his face was as red as a tomato," Sam Saleh said. "I said, 'What happened, did you get fired?'"Sam tried to convince his son to stay at the bank, which was secure and safe, but he quickly realized it was a lost cause. Robert wanted to coach, and nothing was going to change his mind.Seeking advice, Robert reached out to his old high school coach, Stergalas, who didn't paint a pretty picture of the road ahead. He told Robert he'd better learn how to make coffee and run a copy machine because those would be his primary responsibilities as a college graduate assistant. That didn't faze him.Stergalas set up an interview for Robert by calling Mike Vollmar, the Michigan State director of football operations and an alum of neighboring Riverview High School. Coincidentally, Saleh's Jets predecessor, Adam Gase, was an undergraduate assistant for the Spartans only three years earlier.After two years at Michigan State, where he made $650 per month, Saleh used his connections to land a GA position at Central Michigan in 2004 under current Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly. Most coaching wannabes don't do a second GA stint, but Saleh felt he needed more seasoning.

"I'm not ready to go out in the world yet," he told Stergalas.

Saleh was ready for the world after a year at Central Michigan and a year at Georgia. He made a lot of coffee and copies, but he also impressed his bosses with how quickly and clearly he was able to produce scouting reports on different computer programs. His NFL tour started in 2005 with a six-year run in Houston, his longest stint in one city.Former Texans defensive coordinator Richard Smith met Saleh's father one day at practice and told him his son was too smart for football, that he should be a college professor. Saleh's intelligence is overshadowed by his sideline exuberance, but those who know him say he's extremely sharp.Posluszny said Saleh has the ability to turn complicated material into simple concepts for the players to learn. In its purest form, coaching is teaching. Each week in Jacksonville, he presented the opponent's favorite running plays, followed by play-action passes off those runs. Clear. Concise. Easy to digest.

"He was thinking well in advance, not only what would happen immediately but what would happen later in the game as well," Posluszny said.Saleh plots strategy like he plays chess -- and he does that pretty well, too. Years ago, he reached 1,800 in the chess rating system, according to his father -- not far from master level. Sam Saleh taught his kids and their friends how to play chess, once putting up $50 for a winner-take-all tournament. Robert didn't win and demanded another tournament. Yeah, he's fiercely competitive, too.

'I'm supposed to be here' in New York

Saleh's coaching philosophy was shaped during his time in Seattle (2011-13), where he was introduced to coach Pete Carroll and defensive coordinator Gus Bradley, a close confidant and the current Las Vegas Raiders coordinator. Bradley remembers the day in his office when he interviewed Saleh for a quality-control position on the staff.

pl"He convinced me that it would be a big mistake if I didn't hire him," Bradley said, laughing at the memory.That offseason, the Seahawks rebooted on defense, as Carroll challenged his defensive coaches to create a player-friendly scheme. They opted for Cover 3, tailored around their immense talent in the secondary -- aka the Legion of Boom. Two years later, they won the Super Bowl with one of the best defenses in history. To this day, Saleh uses that as his base defense.

"Robert was in that beginning stages of it," Bradley said, "and he was great."Saleh eventually followed Bradley to Jacksonville, where he became a position coach for the first time and built a reputation for connecting with players. As soon as he got the job, he took Posluszny out to dinner. The linebacker was blown away; he had never had a coach who wanted to break bread with him. They talked football and life. When Posluszny got home that night, he told his wife, "This guy is really impressive."

Bradley was fired during the 2016 season and most of the staff was replaced, so Saleh ended up in San Francisco as the defensive coordinator. He inherited the 32nd-ranked defense, but this was no overnight success story. The first two seasons were bumpy; there were rumors about his job security. Everything clicked in 2019, when the 49ers soared to No. 2 in total defense and won the NFC championship.That defense was stacked with talent, and Saleh was able to galvanize it with his upbeat personality and clever schemes. In 2020, star defensive tackle DeForest Buckner was traded and other stalwarts such as cornerback Richard Sherman and defensive end Nick Bosa were injured. Somehow, the Niners finished fifth in yards allowed despite a 6-10 record."Robert helped to build a successful environment that has developed both players and coaches," 49ers coach Kyle Shanahan said.

Coveted by six of the seven NFL teams that had head-coaching vacancies, Saleh told friends he preferred the Jets or Jaguars over the rest. The Jaguars hired Urban Meyer, leaving Saleh for the Jets, who made him their No. 1 choice after the first round of interviews.

Maybe it's destiny.

Saleh will coach in MetLife Stadium, where he enjoyed the biggest win of his professional career -- the Seahawks' rout of the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XLVIII. In his 50-yard-line seats, Sam Saleh had looked at his wife, Fatin, and said, "Who would've thought we'd have a son in the Super Bowl?"Before that day in February 2014, members of the Saleh family ventured to lower Manhattan, where they visited the Freedom Tower -- built on the site of the old World Trade Center. David, who could have been one of the 3,000 who lost their lives, brought his daughter with him. What a story to tell.Coincidentally, the first Sunday of the 2021 NFL season is Sept. 12, which means Robert Saleh's head-coaching debut is on track to occur at MetLife one day after the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attack.

"I'm supposed to be here, and I believe that," Saleh said of the Jets. "God does things for a reason, and I believe this is one of them."

>   https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/30770998/robert-saleh-journey-new-york-jets-began-9-11-epiphany

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3 hours ago, HighPitch said:

Yes it is .

100%

It was a civil and interesting discussion about race, history, religion and what makes one fall into certain categories discussed by adults with a positive vibe and you, one of the race baiters of JN, had to sour it with your bull.

 

You are racist. It's always on YOUR MIND. 

 

ps no need for a personal attack either. figure it out already

Always on my mind? You’ve dug up something a month old... and started a racial argument over it... but I’m the agitator? 

Race was on my mind in that moment, yes. It was MLK day and the thread was about our 1st time Muslim and Lebanese coach. The thread was inherently about race. The first handful of post said “I don’t care, win games”. Super positive vibe, yes.

Cry more. Snowflake.

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If you're from Metro Detroit like I am, then you know just how strong, how proud and how hard-working our fellow Americans in Dearborn truly are. You won't find a closer knit, harder working group around. That goes for the Muslims and for the Christians. The amount of pride they have in their businesses, their community and their family is second to none. For years they've had to put up with countless amounts of bigoted bullsh*t, from everything to the garbage of their community being governed by Sharia to them sympathizing with terrorists. It's all 100%, pure unadulterated bullsh*t. They serve their country in the military, in law enforcement, in the medical services just like anyone else. Their Islamic mosques and Chaldean churches sit alongside churches and temples.  It's an honor to be a fellow American with them.

You're talking to the most pessimistic Jets fan on the planet and i"m here to tell you, we got a winner with Coach Saleh. The dose of emotional dedication and most importantly, passion that franchise just had injected into it can't be stressed enough.

For one of the first times since Parcells came on board, I have a good feeling about things. I cant wait for the pride of Dearborn Fordson High School and Northern Michigan University to take the field in fall.

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11 hours ago, HighPitch said:

Yes it is .

100%

It was a civil and interesting discussion about race, history, religion and what makes one fall into certain categories discussed by adults with a positive vibe and you, one of the race baiters of JN, had to sour it with your bull.

 

You are racist. It's always on YOUR MIND. 

 

ps no need for a personal attack either. figure it out already

 

8 hours ago, Integrity28 said:

Always on my mind? You’ve dug up something a month old... and started a racial argument over it... but I’m the agitator? 

Race was on my mind in that moment, yes. It was MLK day and the thread was about our 1st time Muslim and Lebanese coach. The thread was inherently about race. The first handful of post said “I don’t care, win games”. Super positive vibe, yes.

Cry more. Snowflake.

Hey guys you have both spoken on the matter, now let's just skate away.  Thanks.

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11 hours ago, Maxman said:

Hey guys you have both spoken on the matter, now let's just skate away.  Thanks.

if i may,.. no prob.  they'll be fine...

giphy.gif

Jets  ROCK !

😎

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-- New York Jets coach Robert Saleh has been on the job for three weeks, but he already has set himself apart from Adam Gase in at least one respect: coaching-staff composition.Saleh's staff, almost complete, is a reunion of sorts -- a collection of coaching colleagues from each of his previous NFL stops. In fact, 11 of his 13 hires for key positions -- coordinators and position coaches -- are coaches he worked with previously. This is a common practice in the industry, but Saleh has taken it to a new level.

 

Robert Saleh's Coaching Staff

nyj.png?w=110&h=110&transparent=trueThe New York Jets' new coach has worked previously with 11 of his 13 coordinators and position coaches. Here are their titles with the team, plus years of experience in the NFL:

POS. COACH EXP
Others: Asst. O-line Jake Moreland;
Asst. D-line Nate Ollie;
Defensive Asst.: Ricky
Manning Jr., Hayes Pullard and Chip Vaughn;
Offensive Assts.:
Mack Brown and Billy Vandemerkt
OC Mike LaFleur 7
QBs Rob Calabrese 2
WRs Miles Austin 1
RBs Taylor Embree 3
TEs Ron Middleton 11
OL/run-game John Benton 18
Pass-game Greg Knapp 24
DC Jeff Ulbrich 8
Sr Def Asst./CBs Tony Oden 17
D-line Aaron Whitecotton 7
LBs Mike Rutenberg 10
Safeties Marquand Manuel 9
Special teams Brant Boyer 9

In most cases, familiarity is a good thing, especially for a team in transition. If nothing else, it shows Saleh was hands-on during the process, choosing his guys.That's noteworthy, considering the Jets were criticized in 2019 when the front office scared away head-coaching candidate Matt Rhule because it wanted to pick his staff for him. Rhule was a college coach at the time, and there were concerns about his ability to gather an NFL staff.The front office also had input into Gase's staff, creating an arranged marriage between him and defensive coordinator Gregg Williams, who had a big say on some of the defensive hires. In the end, Gase assembled a highly experienced group of coaches, nearly half of whom had no previous ties to him.

That dynamic no longer exists. This is the Saleh ensemble. The upside is they speak the same football language and share a similar philosophy. The downside is that it might limit different ideas."One of the most impressive things through the interview process regarding Robert and his staff was just his thought process on the composition of the staff and how he was thinking about different personalities and different roles," Jets general manager Joe Douglas said. "You really walked away saying, 'Wow, Robert has really thought this out the right way.' I would say that was as impressive as any name that he brought up."

Other takeaways on the new staff:

San Francisco East: Seven coaches have a connection to the 49ers, Saleh's previous team, including five from the 2020 staff -- Mike LaFleur (offensive coordinator), John Benton (offensive line/run-game coordinator), Aaron Whitecotton (defensive line), Mike Rutenberg (linebackers) and Tony Oden (senior defensive assistant/cornerbacks). New head coaches always bring along assistants from their previous team, but five is a high number.Prior to 2020, Miles Austin (wide receivers) and Taylor Embree (running backs) worked for the Niners, overlapping with Saleh. You can bet this will be a factor in NFL free agency. Don't be surprised if a handful of ex-Niner players wind up in New York.

Blasts from the past: Reaching back into his early coaching years, Saleh hired assistants he met with the Jacksonville Jaguars (2014-16), Seattle Seahawks (2011-13) and Houston Texans (2005-10).From Jacksonville is Ron Middleton (tight ends). From his Seattle connections are Jeff Ulbrich (defensive coordinator) and Marquand Manuel (safeties). From his time in Houston is Greg Knapp (pass-game coordinator). Of the 13 top assistants, the only two who didn't coach with Saleh previously are Rob Calabrese (quarterbacks) and Brant Boyer (special teams), a holdover from the past two Jets coaching regimes.

Green on offense: Saleh has a handful of first-timers on this side of the ball -- a first-time playcaller (LaFleur) and three first-time position coaches (Calabrese, Embree and Austin). Basically, he's entrusting Sam Darnold (or another quarterback) to a rookie coach in Calabrese, 30, who has only two years of quality-control experience at the NFL level. Presumably, he will lean on Knapp, a former offensive coordinator and 24-year coaching veteran.The key, of course, is LaFleur, 34, whom Saleh referred to as "Little Mikey" in a recent interview. Saleh met LaFleur through his older brother, Green Bay Packers coach Matt LaFleur, a close friend. Saleh will oversee the entire team, but he's essentially handing off the offense to LaFleur, who spent the past seven years learning under 49ers coach Kyle Shanahan."Nobody in the world knows [that style of offense] better than he does," Saleh said of LaFleur. "[I'm] really excited about the vision that we have in place for the offensive side, and there's no one better in the world than the people that we've hired to be able to do that. So, it's going to be an exciting time for this organization."

>    Jets' revamped coaching staff: 'Frisco' flavor, old friends and new approach - New York Jets- ESPN

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The Jets' hiring of Robert Saleh last month has garnered near-universal praise, including from trusted observers like Adam Schefter, a Senior NFL Insider at ESPN, and Saleh's former players like Richard Sherman."An impressive guy," Schefter told Eric Allen of nyjets.com about the 49ers' former defensive coordinator. "I love the guy. Very, very impressive. There are certain people who get it. And he gets it. He's on it. His players love him and I think the Jets' players will love playing for him."

Schefter added: "When I see Richard Sherman's posts about Robert Saleh it speaks volume. He [Sherman] has been around so many great coaches, he's been around the game so long, he knows the personalities and knows what it takes to win in this league. He's endorsing Robert Saleh and saying the things he says about him. To me that's meaningful."

The Jets landed Saleh amid a feeding frenzy centered on the native of Dearborn, Mich., who last season deftly adjusted after the defense in San Francisco sustained a series of injuries to key players like Nick Bosa, Sherman, Dee Ford and others."He wanted a head-coaching job," Schefter said. "He was talking to other teams. But in a game of musical chairs in coaching, you have to do what you can to find the right chair and the right spot. He looked at the Jets and he liked the front-office structure, he liked Joe Douglas, he liked Christopher Johnson. They wanted him. It's sort of like when you're dating, you date a lot of people and sometimes there's one that it just feels right. And I believe with Robert Saleh and the Jets just felt like it should be.

"In New York, they meet with Robert. They loved Robert. And there's the makings of the match."

Punter Braden Mann's Rookie Year Was a Kick
The Jets were clinging to a 23-20 lead with fewer than six minutes left in the game at the Los Angeles Rams on Dec. 20. Rookie punter Braden Mann's 50-yard kick was fielded by Nsimba Webster. Webster's weaving run seemed headed to the end zone and a possible Rams' victory, which would have consigned the Jets to an 0-14 record. But Mann, a former high-school linebacker, knifed in to make the tackle and help preserve the Jets' first victory of the season.It was his fourth tackle (four off the team lead on special teams held by Matthias Farley) in defense of a punt during the 2020 NFL season.

"I hope I don't have to grow too much in that area anymore," Mann told Olivia Landis of nyjets.com about his tackling prowess. "I hope that era is over with. No tackles, no returns. I just felt like I made the tackles I had to make."Mann, the Jets' final pick in the 2020 NFL draft out of Texas A&M, punted 82 times (the most in the league) last season, averaging 43.9 yards a kick (37.2 yards net) with a long of 60 yards (Week 8 at Kansas City). He landed 19 punts inside the opponent's 20-yard line.

Asked about his biggest adjustment from college to the NFL, Mann said: "Just knowing every single team you play will have one of the best returners in the world, knowing all those guys are dangerous and you have to try and control them the best you can. Just going into each game knowing you can't give them the ball too much or they're going make you pay for it."

For Jets, a Potentially Transformative Draft
With two picks (No. 2 and No. 23) in the first round, and five selections among the first 86 players chosen in the 2021 NFL Draft, the Jets are positioned to add a slew of young and hungry players.

"Where we are right now, the draft has the potential to be a turning point," said Dane Brugler of The Athletic on the NFL Draft Preview podcast with Ethan Greenberg of nyjets.com. "Draft capital, cap space and directions they could go ... it's going to be fun."

While the Jets have a lot of options, the club also has a lot of needs."The strengths [in the draft] line up well with the Jets' needs," Brugler said. "We know quarterback is a possibility, there are intriguing pass rushers late in the first/early second rounds, cornerbacks, offensive line is laden with players. Then there's another stacked group of wide receivers. The Jets are in position and don't have to trade up, though their needs will fluctuate between now and April depending on free agency."

He added: "We've been spoiled the last few years by top-tier rushers like the Bosas, but this year you don't have the guy."

>    newyorkjets.com/news/notebook-jets-will-love-playing-for-robert-saleh-says-espn-s-adam-schefter

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Rich Cimini    ESPN Staff Writer 

The Jets have hired former RB/KR Leon Washington as a special teams assistant. Washington, 38, was a popular player for the Jets in the late 2000s. In 2007 and 2008, he scored a combined 15 TDs, including four kickoff returns. He will assistant special teams coordinator Brant Boyer, who was retained by new HC Robert Saleh.

>    https://www.espn.com/nfl/team/_/name/nyj/new-york-jets

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1 hour ago, Embrace the Suck said:

https://michaelbaystransformers.fandom.com/wiki/Optimus_Prime

Never seen the movies, but grew up with the cartoons as a kid in the early/mid 80s. The reference is to transformers with regard to you saying Saleh is more than just a head coach.

dear EmbtheSu, hi !  😎.. thank you ! !:beer:

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Rich CiminiESPN Staff Writer 

Robert Saleh has added a new position on his staff — chief of staff, and he hired Steve Scarnecchia to fill that role. (First reported by NY Post.) He spent the last six seasons as the Falcons' assistant head coach. Scarneccia made headlines in 2010, when he was fired by the Broncos for filming a 49ers walkthrough before a game in London. Previously, he worked in the Patriots' video department, which gained infamy for the 2007 SpyGate scandal. By then, he was a member of the Jets' video team.

https://www.espn.com/nfl/team/_/name/nyj/new-york-jets

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On 1/18/2021 at 12:54 PM, docdhc said:

Not trying to be controversial but are people of Arab descent considered people of color or caucasian?  How does the NFL define a minority hire now that there are draft compensation bonuses for having a minority assistant coach leaving and getting a head coaching job?

I have no doubt this hire would satisfy the minority hire concerns of the NFL.   While I couldn't care less about that I'm just happy to have him.  It's time to build a winning franchise.  

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3 hours ago, Esquire said:

I have no doubt this hire would satisfy the minority hire concerns of the NFL.   While I couldn't care less about that I'm just happy to have him.  It's time to build a winning franchise.  

agreed !  😎..we have had two good head-coaches ( weeb ewbank & bill parcells ) i'm hopin' he turns out/proves to be our third   😉

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Writer Conor Orr of Sports Illustrated graded all of the NFL’s head-coaching hires and gave the Jets an "A" for landing Robert Saleh.

"I've said this before, but I believe Saleh brings all the good energy of the Rex Ryan era without the side effects," Orr wrote. "Essentially, the green tea version of Ryan. That is the emotional component of it. Yes, Saleh had an excellent defensive roster and a complementary offense in San Francisco, but he also had to wrangle a defense of gigantic personalities. You don't simply get someone like Richard Sherman on board without having a strong, requisite knowledge of your scheme and where it's headed. His 'All Gas, No Brakes' slogan served as the motivational underpinning of the 49ers roster that made the Super Bowl.

"The other slice of the A grade is the fact that he managed to peel Mike LaFleur away from [HC Kyle] Shanahan, who clung tightly to both of his top offensive assistants. Introducing that system to Sam Darnold is a massive part of this equation."Saleh, who became the Jets' 20thhead coach, led the 49ers' defense for the past four seasons. In the 2020 season, San Francisco had a top-10 unit in total yards (No. 5), rush yards (No. 7) and pass yards (No. 4) despite a number of injuries, such as those sustained by DE Nick Bosa and Sherman. Saleh was named Coordinator of the Year by The Sporting Newsfollowing the 2019 season when the 49ers represented the NFC in Super Bowl LIV.

LaFleur spent the past three seasons as the 49ers' passing-game coordinator and has been with Shanahan since 2014, when LaFleur first entered the NFL as an offensive assistant with the Browns. San Francisco had 13 players with at least one touchdown reception in 2019, which tied an NFL record. In Atlanta in 2016, LaFleur worked with the wide receivers when Julio Jones finished second in the NFL with 1,409 receiving yards. LaFleur, 31, is the younger brother of Packers' HC Matt LaFeur and will implement the Shanahan system that uses a lot of pre-snap motion. Saleh said "nobody in the world knows it better than [LaFleur]" and the scheme has helped QBs such as Jimmy Garoppolo, Matt Ryan, Ryan Tanehill, Aaron Rodgers and Jake Plummer put up career numbers.

https://www.newyorkjets.com/news/sports-illustrated-gives-jets-an-a-for-hiring-robert-saleh

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Former LB Paul Posluszny: Robert Saleh Is Made for An Opportunity Like This with the Jets

NFL Standout Talks About New Jets Head Coach Robert Saleh with Team Reporter Eric Allen

video

>  https://www.newyorkjets.com/video/former-lb-paul-posluszny-robert-saleh-is-made-for-an-opportunity-like-this-with-

 

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Stopped reading after the first sentence of pandering. I get spoonfed and forcefed enough manipulative attempts to "educate" me by TV commercials.

Btw, I'm really happy to see Adam Gase's name finally scrubbed from the JN banner. Maybe we can eradicate him from the written record like the ancient Egyptians used to do to "deposed" leaders. I can't believe we all lived through that guy. Go Saleh! GO JETS!

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On 2/20/2021 at 7:13 AM, Barton said:

Seems like the guy might be a good emotional leader. But he's gonna need alot more than that to win. Lets see how the Jets do with X's and O's. 

Saleh is coaching to where football is REALLY going.

That should be the new slogan.

Pardon our appearance (picture of Gase mopping the floor), the new go is coaching to where things are really going. We promise.  (picture of Woody yelling at Christopher).

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