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Chad Hansen WR - 4th round


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Hansen.pngThe Jets traded down in the 4th round and walked away with an extra 6th round pick. With the 141st overall pick in the 4th round the New York Jets selected wide receiver Chad Hansen from Cal.

Here is his scouting report from NFL.com:

STRENGTHS

Maneuvers around route redirection in space and keeps his route on time. Works back to the throw. Has some talent after catch on wide receiver screens. Drive off the line and into his routes is consistent no matter which level he is going to work. Good awareness near sidelines. Able to drop his feet in-bounds when crowded against the boundary. Plays with good strength and physicality when mugged in his routes. Has fluid, powerful strides to burst past cornerbacks on vertical routes. Natural ball-tracker.

WEAKNESSES

Upright off the snap and into his routes. Is eventual into breaks and allows cornerback time to gear down and transition back to the ball. Can be jammed up by strong press corners. Doesn't create enough consistent separation with his intermediate routes. Route work at Cal was basic.

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Another profile:

Quote

Chad Hanson   WR   California

TALENT
ROUND
2

STRENGTHS
Chad is an acrobatic speed receiver with the potential to become an intricate part of your passing game. He has good size and good mental toughness. He has excellent hands and with his ability to adjust to the ball in the air and snatch the ball with his hands Chad the “potential” to become a franchise receiver similar to Steelers Antonio Brown. The difference being Antonio is listed at 5’10” 185 lbs and Chad is listed at 6’1’ 195 Lbs and is more acrobatic and with a bigger catch radius. He has quick feet and excellent balance to make yardage after the catch. He will catch the ball in a crowd and is adept at leaping an extending his catch radius. Chad works hard all game long and does a solid job blocking when asked to. There is a lot potential to work with and I believe there is upside to this kids overall game to become a franchise receiver for the team that selects him. 

CONCERNS
In the offensive system that Chad is in, he is not running the whole route tree so a learning curve is obvious. He will struggle getting off the line against bigger and faster and quicker completion until he learns the tricks of the trade. He has to bulk up to take the pounding at the next level and to add more run after the catch yardage to his game. The key to Chad’s game is that he has the speed to go deep and the acrobatic talents to have a big catch radius. Chad will be downgraded because of the offensive system but if he runs at the combine as fast as I think he can he will move up very quickly. 

BOTTOM LINE
The NFL teams love speed and when they see a player with excellent speed they have a tendency to overlook issues that would normally bother them and down grade any other player. It would not surprise me to see Chad run in the 4.3 area at the combine and if that happens most teams will go back the film and see that Chad is a lot more talented catching the ball than your average speed receiver. Although I have compared Chad to Antonio Brown, Chad has a long ways to go before he proves that he can stand in Antonio’s shadow much less be his equal. Remember the word “potential” has as much a negative meaning as a positive meaning. Chad’s “potential” to be the same style receiver as Antonio Brown will depend on learning to change gears running his routes, become more physical getting off the line and more physical running routes. It will take some time but he looks to be a hard worker and never gives up all game long running routes and trying to get open for his quarterback. I think what sets him apart from most speed receivers is his acrobatic abilities to adjust to the ball in the air giving him a large catch radius and of course his size. Chad has some work to do but if he works hard there is no limit to his ability to become one of the better receivers to come out in this draft…or for that matter any draft! But then again…right now it’s just in the “potential” faze. 

Drew Boylhart  FEB.2017

 

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https://www.google.com/amp/www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/news/2017-nfl-draft-cal-receiver-chad-hansen-highlights-best-available-on-day-3/amp/

 

2017 NFL Draft: Cal receiver Chad Hansen highlights best available on Day 3

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There are 107 draft picks in the books for the 2017 NFL Draft as three rounds have passed with several potential impact players off the board. However, there is still talent available on the draft board and for various reasons.

Below are the top players available entering Day 3 on Saturday.

1. Chad Hansen, WR, California (6-2, 202, 4.53)

A transfer from the FCS level, Hansen waited his turn at Cal and dominated as a junior in 2016, attacking defenses at every level with the athleticism to get open and create after the catch. He is simply a fun player to watch play football.

 
chad-hansen-california.jpg
Chad Hansen knows how to create after the catch.USATSI

2. Carl Lawson, DE/OLB, Auburn (6-2, 261, 4.67)

A Brandon Graham-type of rusher, Lawson does a great job using his lower-body movement and upper-body power in unison to beat blockers off the edge. He lacks ideal length and his past medical issues are a concern, but Lawson has the energetic play style off the edge that NFL teams covet.

3. Desmond King, DB, Iowa (5-10, 201, 4.53)

The Thorpe Award winner in 2015 as a junior, King returned to school for his senior season and didn't have the same type of production. He doesn't have ideal speed, which might make him move to safety, but his cover awareness, ball skills and toughness are NFL quality.

 
 

4. Jake Butt, TE, Michigan (6-5, 246, 4.74)

Projected as a top-50 prospect last summer, Butt suffered a torn ACL in his bowl game, which caused him to fall out of the top three rounds. The medical reports have been favorable and he should return to the field early in the 2016 season, allowing a team to get him at a discount.

5. Dorian Johnson, G, Pittsburgh (6-5, 300, 5.27)

A mauling left guard, Johnson looks the part and isn't afraid to move bodies in the run game. Some teams are worried about his medicals due to an issue with his liver and that could drop him down boards, but at some point, he will be worth the risk.

 
 

6. Eddie Jackson, FS, Alabama (6-0, 201, 4.53)

A four-year starter at Alabama, Jackson made the transition from cornerback to safety as a junior and collected six interceptions. He returned for his senior season, but suffered a season-ending left leg fracture in October -- his second major surgery after tearing the ACL in his right knee in 2014.

7. Jaleel Johnson, DT, Iowa (6-3, 316, 5.38)

With 7.5 sacks as a senior in 2016, Johnson became the first Iowa defensive tackle to lead the team in sacks since Mike Daniels in 2011. He doesn't play with much consistency and is better against the run than the pass, but the flashes are enticing with his body control and heavy hands.

 

8. Corn Elder, CB, Miami (Fla.) (5-10, 183, 4.55)

Elder often shadowed the opposing team's top receiver and did a nice job with his twitched-up athleticism to stay attached at the hip with wideouts. He won't be a fit for every defense with his size, but the toughness and route anticipation makes him a nickel candidate with special teams ability.

9. Samaje Perine, RB, Oklahoma (5-11, 233, 4.65)

Perine first introduced himself to college football when he set the FBS single-game record with 427 rushing yards as a freshman in 2014. He is an ordinary athlete and dependent on the blocking in front of him, but his balance as a runner and physical blocking skills are NFL worthy.

 
 
samaje-perine-sugar-bowl.jpg
Samaje Perine set an FBS record for rushing yards in a game. USATSI

10. Dede Westbrook, WR, Oklahoma (6-0, 178, 4.39)

There are some off-field and personality worries with Westbrook, but he can stretch the field with his speed (12 touchdown catches of at least 40 yards last season). Although he has a slight frame and comes with character concerns, his explosive vertical skills will land him somewhere.

Best of the rest:

11. Isaiah Ford, WR, Virginia Tech
12. Nico Siragusa, G, San Diego State
13. Shelton Gibson, WR, West Virginia
14. Roderick Johnson, OT, Florida State
15. Jalen Myrick, CB, Minnesota
16. Tyler Orlosky, C, West Virginia 
17. Jordan Leggett, TE, Clemson
18. Josh Malone, WR, Tennessee
19. Marlon Mack, RB, South Florida
20. Nathan Peterman, QB, Pittsburgh 
21. Davon Godchaux, DT, LSU
22. Danny Isidora, G, Miami (Fla.) 
23. Julie'n Davenport, OT, Bucknell 
24. George Kittle, TE, Iowa 
25. Will Holden, OT, Vanderbilt

 
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This pick was a steal for the Jets. He's physical and plays big. He has good ball skills and can get deep.

PFF had him ranked in their top 100. I like this pick a lot.

I like our group of young receivers. We just have to get somebody who can throw them the football. But it looks like that guy won't be here till next year.

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  Chad Hansen Player Comparison
Height 6'2" 6'3"
Weight 202 212
Arm 32 1/8" 32 1/8"
Hands 10 1/8" 10 1/2"
40 4.53 4.57
Bench 11 18
Vert 35 35
Broad 119 126
3 Cone 6.74 6.8
20 yd Shuttle 4.13 4.13
Grade 5.68 5.81

Hansen:
STRENGTHS Maneuvers around route redirection in space and keeps his route on time. Works back to the throw. Has some talent after catch on wide receiver screens. Drive off the line and into his routes is consistent no matter which level he is going to work. Good awareness near sidelines. Able to drop his feet in-bounds when crowded against the boundary. Plays with good strength and physicality when mugged in his routes. Has fluid, powerful strides to burst past cornerbacks on vertical routes. Natural ball-tracker. Plus body control for ball adjustments in any direction. Hands are strong and can secure in traffic. Didn't have to run much of the route tree, but showed willingness to work the middle. Gives physical, extended effort as run-blocker punching into cornerbacks frame and locking out. Able to make first tackler miss and accelerate into open field.
WEAKNESSES Upright off the snap and into his routes. Is eventual into breaks and allows cornerback time to gear down and transition back to the ball. Can be jammed up by strong press corners. Doesn't create enough consistent separation with his intermediate routes. Route work at Cal was basic. Will face his share of contested catches on the pro level. Allows throws to crowd his frame. Needs to get better at using body to shield throws from defenders.

Player Comparison:
STRENGTHS Has the triangle numbers (height/weight/speed) of a WR1. Drives off the line of scrimmage selling his vertical push and forcing cornerbacks into passive position. Uses plus separation quickness at top of his route to provide comfortable passing window. Hands catcher who catches away from his frame when possible. Wasn't asked to work vertically much, but tape looks like he has a shot. Has the juice after catch to make defenses pay the price for missed tackles. Real red zone target who stacks the defender, tracks throw out of quarterback's hand and makes late play on the ball over top of defender. Has desired traits and flashes the tools.
WEAKNESSES Struggles with footwork out of press release spending excessive time trying to fake and shake cornerbacks. Still figuring out this whole "route running" thing. Needs to improve playing through contact and adjusting routes appropriately. Still thinking rather than just playing. Will have to work back to the throw more often on NFL level. Won't win over quarterbacks with inability to rescue the off-­target throws. Plays with passive field demeanor against aggressive cornerbacks. Won't go looking for work as run blocker if he doesn't have to. Doesn't appear to offer special teams value.

Hansen has a little more work to do than the player comparison with creating separation, hand catching away from his body and better use of his body.  But I do like that the scouting report pointing out that Hansen has "Plus body control for ball adjustments in any direction" and that he "Gives physical, extended effort as run-blocker punching into cornerbacks frame and locking out", something that the other prospect had as a weakness.

Player comparison: New Orleans Saints 2016 2nd round draft pick: Michael Thomas

Hansen doesn't have Brees throwing to him but he was taken 2 rounds later and maybe John Morton can work some of the same magic he did with Thomas.

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On 4/29/2017 at 2:28 PM, Paddywagon said:

Good pick. Big guy with enough speed to stretch the field but with surprisingly YAC ability. Only one year of production though. BPA. A-.

I guess we're going to a west coast offense. When is Macc going to do something about the OL though?

After he's fired. 

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PFF SChttps://www.profootballfocus.com/draft-pff-scouting-report-chad-hansen-wr-california/OUTING REPORT: CHAD HANSEN, WR, CALIFORNIA

The PFF analysis team breaks down the prospects of California's Chad Hansen ahead of the 2017 NFL Draft.

PFF ANALYSIS TEAM | 2 MONTHS AGO  
(Brian Bahr/Getty Images)

(Brian Bahr/Getty Images)

Name: Chad Hansen

School: California

Position fit: Wide receiver

Stats to know: Caught all 17 catchable deep passes (20-plus yards in the air) last season.

What he does best:

  • Very physical at the point of catch and can muscle the ball away from the defensive back, which makes him a solid target in the end zone.
  • Excellent at high pointing the ball and winning contested catches over cornerbacks.
  • Terrific deep threat as he can adjust and separate from the cornerback with his positioning when the ball is in the air.
  • Has a large catch radius and has good enough hands to haul in slightly inaccurate passes.
  • Elusive on quick passes such as screens and often gets past the first defender.
  • Has good awareness, which allows him to make tough sideline catches.
  • Can get down to the ground quickly to catch slightly inaccurate low passes.

Biggest concern:

  • Does not attack the football on a consistent basis on short passes and therefore often allows defenders to make a play on the ball.
  • Despite his good hands, he does not trust them enough and lets too many passes in to his pads, although, he has improved in this aspect towards the end of his junior season.
  • Although his cuts are sharp, he is relatively slow out of his breaks.
  • While he is physical at the catch point, he can be disrupted, rerouted and occasionally even pushed out of bounds early in the play by physical cornerbacks.
  • Not as sharp running in/out cuts.

Player comparison: Demaryius Thomas, Denver Broncos

Similar to Thomas, Hansen’s main strength is his physicality and ability to high point the football and fight for it in the air. However, also similarly, both receivers have a tendency to be disrupted and rerouted by physical cornerbacks in press coverage. In addition, both receivers can contribute by evading defenders and taking screen passes past the first-down marker.

Bottom line: Hansen can still be viewed as a work-in-progress since he had only one season as a starter at an FBS school. However, he already proved that he excels at some aspects of the game, including catching the deep pass and making contested receptions on the sideline. While Hansen is not a final product yet, his skill set should help him contribute on screen passes and as a deep threat already in Year 1 in the NFL.

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