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T0mShane    90,845

What does the manner in which a head coach employs a rookie QB have to do with his development? How can one know what is unknown? Is the cat in the box dead or alive? If a tree falls in the forest, does it make a sound? Why do cats only meow in the presence of humans? Are there finite parameters to the universe? Why don't they make weed that I can ignite in the shower? If Train A leaves New York traveling at a rate of 56 MPH, and Train B leaves Boston at the same time traveling at 75 MPH? Why do coaches ever get fired? Were the pyramids built by aliens? How about Machu Picchu? Is $15 million more or less than $11 million? Does John Idzik have thoughts? How does anyone predict rain before they get wet? Why is Drew Barrymore a huge star but Jenna Von Oy isn't?

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Thor99    409,993

For years, I thought that was a flavor of coffee.

 

I'm a little embarrassed that I know who that is, without looking it up.

 

Whoa!

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T0mShane    90,845

I'm a little embarrassed that I know who that is, without looking it up.

Whoa!

I know, right? Her-herrrrrrr

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khesanh    89

I am telling you guys, Joseph Fauria at TE. 6'7", 259lbs, athletic as hell, good hands and has crazy leaping ability on the field. The guy can play and will be an absolute steal as an UDFA.

What happened with that Ivy League kid from who was being talked up as a pass rusher supreme? Did he get drafted?

I love Fauria very good TE underrated and great in.the red zone

I would take Da'Rick based only on his name -- it is d'awesome.

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Geno is so cute. He is so excited, walking towards the door not realizing that it leads to a room full of rotating knives.

Edited by Lurking Troll
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Ryno the Jet    35,961

Geno is so cute. He is so excited, walking towards the door not realizing that it leads to a room full of rotating knives.

Dude, we got rid of D Rob years ago...no more bowling balls with knives round here.

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Dude, we got rid of D Rob years ago...no more bowling balls with knives round here.

But if bowling balls with knives are outlawed only outlaws will have bowling balls with knives.

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Ryno the Jet    35,961

But if bowling balls with knives are outlawed only outlaws will have bowling balls with knives.

Sorry, politics are not allowed in this forum. I hope they don't ban you...or do I??

Um74r.gif

Edited by Ryno the Jet

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#27TheDominator    203,585

Pantale projects as a blocking TE.  Here are his workout numbers:

 

40 yard dash:  4.99 sec. dead last among all 13 TEs who ran at the combine (best time was Furstenburg, 4.62 sec)

 

Broad jump: 9'2" dead last among all 13 TEs who jumped at the combine (best was Eifert & McDonald, 9'11")

 

Vertical jump: 33 1/2" tied with 1 other for 5th among 13 TEs who jumped at the combine (best was Eifert & Furstenberg, 35 1/2")

 

3 Cone Drill: 7.48 sec. dead last among the 10 TEs who participated at the combine (best was Escobar, 7.07 sec.)

 

Bench Press: 17 reps tied with two others for 8th among the 11 TEs who participated at the combine (best was Eifert, Kasa, & Sims, 22 reps)

 

 

Not exactly a workout warrior.  Hey, he was undrafted.

 

Shanahan is a converted WR, similar to Jeff Cumberland (although Cumberland initially played TE then converted to WR then back to TE.  Also, Cumberland ran a sub-4.5 at his pro day.  Shanahan supposedly plays much faster than his timed speed, but his timed speed at his pro day was 4.81).  Honestly I didn't know Cumberland timed that fast; doesn't look like a speed demon on the field.  Maybe he's put on a lot of weight since then.

 

Basically to sum up, one guy is a blocking TE and one guy is a receiving TE.

 

 

I don't think Pantale is necessarily a blocking TE.  He's just big and slow.  He was a pretty strong prospect, but he broke his foot last year. Came back and caught a bunch of balls the second half, but I don't think anybody expected him to be so slow.   I've seen him described as a "work in progress" as a blocker. 

 

http://www.nfl.com/combine/profiles/chris-pantale?id=2539208

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#27TheDominator    203,585

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Ryno the Jet    35,961

Ok..I'm usually not easily creeped out...but

Choosy moms choose JiF

Have you met JiF? He's swell, but I have no idea why he felt like he should make that GIF with his shirt off.

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gsnts725    1,961

Forgot to add a scouting report on Zach Rogers. - http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1599052-zach-rogers-scouting-report-nfl-outlook-for-tennessee-wr

 

Strengths

Rogers' biggest strength is his hands. He'll constantly make difficult receptions look easy, including balls thrown away from his frame. He has the willingness to cross the middle of the field and rarely drops passes after contact. Rogers also has a long frame and solid overall awareness.

 

Weaknesses

At only 172 pounds, Rogers desperately needs to add weight if he wants to produce in the NFL. The problem, however, is that Rogers' frame doesn't appear like it can add much weight. Rogers also lacks the athleticism and overall strength to play on the outside in the NFL. His blocking could be improved, as could his crispness when running routes.

 

Tools

Rogers wasn't invited to the 2013 NFL Scouting Combine, but he did participate at the Tennessee pro day. There he ran a 4.49 40-yard dash with a 32" vertical. Those numbers prove that Rogers lacks the athletic ability to be a legitimate threat in the NFL.

 

Intangibles/Character

He was never in the spotlight while at Tennessee, but seemed to thrive in the role the team had built for him. He contributed sparingly during his four years in college, but showed hard work and a desire to be a team player. Rogers should be a positive addition to an NFL locker room.

 

System

Rogers played the majority of his snaps as the slot receiver for Tennessee. He has very little experience being anything else in an offense.

 

Release

When given space, Rogers can have a solid release off the line of scrimmage. However, he lacks the size to not be re-routed when jammed by receivers. He has decent overall speed, but it isn't an explosive speed that will allow him to consistently win against cornerbacks in press coverage.

 

Ball Skills

Rogers displays the ability to make receptions far from his frame in all directions. He's got great awareness when working near the sidelines, too.

 

Routes

There is too much stiffness to Rogers when he's breaking in and out of his routes. He struggles to consistently run clean routes. When he struggles with his footwork, he loses his acceleration and simply becomes ineffective and easy to cover for opposing cornerbacks.

 

Hands

This is easily the most likable trait about Rogers' overall game. His hands are as consistent as they come in terms of prospects for this year's draft. Rogers has extremely consistent hands. He also has the ability to make difficult receptions look easy.

    

He'll consistently make catches away from his frame and displays great concentration on crossing routes and near the sideline.

 

Run After Catch

While Rogers doesn't have elite playmaking skills, he has a sneakiness to his game in the open field that allows him to make plays. He's got good short-area quickness and footwork to occasionally pick up extra yards after the catch.

 

Blocking

Rogers simply isn't physical enough to be successful as a blocker. He rarely wins at the point of attack and will do so even less in the NFL.

 

Future Role/Scheme Versatility

The only way that Rogers is going to make an NFL roster is as a slot receiver. He doesn't have the size or physicality to consistently win on the outside in the NFL. As a slot receiver, however, Rogers looks like a draftable prospect due to his consistent hands and fearlessness when making receptions over the middle of the field.

Edited by gsnts725
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Sperm Edwards    338,542

I don't think Pantale is necessarily a blocking TE.  He's just big and slow.  He was a pretty strong prospect, but he broke his foot last year. Came back and caught a bunch of balls the second half, but I don't think anybody expected him to be so slow.   I've seen him described as a "work in progress" as a blocker. 

 

http://www.nfl.com/combine/profiles/chris-pantale?id=2539208

 

Just going by what I'd read. I've never heard of the guy, never mind having seen the guy play.

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#27TheDominator    203,585

Forgot to add a scouting report on Zach Rogers. - http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1599052-zach-rogers-scouting-report-nfl-outlook-for-tennessee-wr

 

Tools

Rogers wasn't invited to the 2013 NFL Scouting Combine, but he did participate at the Tennessee pro day. There he ran a 4.49 40-yard dash with a 32" vertical. Those numbers prove that Rogers lacks the athletic ability to be a legitimate threat in the NFL.

 

 

Hahahaha,  

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Jetsfan80    72,327

Forgot to add a scouting report on Zach Rogers. - http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1599052-zach-rogers-scouting-report-nfl-outlook-for-tennessee-wr

 

Strengths

Rogers' biggest strength is his hands. He'll constantly make difficult receptions look easy, including balls thrown away from his frame. He has the willingness to cross the middle of the field and rarely drops passes after contact. Rogers also has a long frame and solid overall awareness.

 

Weaknesses

At only 172 pounds, Rogers desperately needs to add weight if he wants to produce in the NFL. The problem, however, is that Rogers' frame doesn't appear like it can add much weight. Rogers also lacks the athleticism and overall strength to play on the outside in the NFL. His blocking could be improved, as could his crispness when running routes.

 

Tools

Rogers wasn't invited to the 2013 NFL Scouting Combine, but he did participate at the Tennessee pro day. There he ran a 4.49 40-yard dash with a 32" vertical. Those numbers prove that Rogers lacks the athletic ability to be a legitimate threat in the NFL.

 

Intangibles/Character

He was never in the spotlight while at Tennessee, but seemed to thrive in the role the team had built for him. He contributed sparingly during his four years in college, but showed hard work and a desire to be a team player. Rogers should be a positive addition to an NFL locker room.

 

System

Rogers played the majority of his snaps as the slot receiver for Tennessee. He has very little experience being anything else in an offense.

 

Release

When given space, Rogers can have a solid release off the line of scrimmage. However, he lacks the size to not be re-routed when jammed by receivers. He has decent overall speed, but it isn't an explosive speed that will allow him to consistently win against cornerbacks in press coverage.

 

Ball Skills

Rogers displays the ability to make receptions far from his frame in all directions. He's got great awareness when working near the sidelines, too.

 

Routes

There is too much stiffness to Rogers when he's breaking in and out of his routes. He struggles to consistently run clean routes. When he struggles with his footwork, he loses his acceleration and simply becomes ineffective and easy to cover for opposing cornerbacks.

 

Hands

This is easily the most likable trait about Rogers' overall game. His hands are as consistent as they come in terms of prospects for this year's draft. Rogers has extremely consistent hands. He also has the ability to make difficult receptions look easy.

    

He'll consistently make catches away from his frame and displays great concentration on crossing routes and near the sideline.

 

Run After Catch

While Rogers doesn't have elite playmaking skills, he has a sneakiness to his game in the open field that allows him to make plays. He's got good short-area quickness and footwork to occasionally pick up extra yards after the catch.

 

Blocking

Rogers simply isn't physical enough to be successful as a blocker. He rarely wins at the point of attack and will do so even less in the NFL.

 

Future Role/Scheme Versatility

The only way that Rogers is going to make an NFL roster is as a slot receiver. He doesn't have the size or physicality to consistently win on the outside in the NFL. As a slot receiver, however, Rogers looks like a draftable prospect due to his consistent hands and fearlessness when making receptions over the middle of the field.

 

Bleacher Report, seriously?

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SouthernJet    208,702

only one I could find. Plus Bleacher Report isn't that bad.

i beg to differ.. their slideshow format is time consuming, annoying and built to grow hits to site at cost to users experience

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gsnts725    1,961

i beg to differ.. their slideshow format is time consuming, annoying and built to grow hits to site at cost to users experience

sure the format is annoying but the quality of the posts are pretty good.

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Kentucky Jet    75,015

Click here for reaction and analysis as we continue to update:

Mike Edwards, CB, Hawaii
5’9 189

Edwards is a talented corner who had some off field issues. He started at out as a Tennessee Vol and was a four star recruit. He was booted off the squab after he was charged with attempted robbery. As a player he gets very physical with receivers despite his short stature so that lack of height, while a major concern, is somewhat negated by that physicality. He should make the squad and could see time as a nickel corner or possibly return man. He saw some snaps at WR at Hawaii as well.

Rontez Miles, S, Cal (PA)
6’0 218

A small school stud with massive 10 (1/4) inch hands and good speed at 4.55-4.62 for a free safety Miles will add speed and athleticism to the practice squad at worst and push for time at best. He needs some development as he adjusts to NFL caliber competition. Miles can jump in and realistically compete for a starting job. The hybrid safety has some Johnathan Cyprien in him, as he is interchangeable at both safety positions. Miles was projected to go as high as the 5th round, was a top small-schooler all year, and was one of the most highly-sought after UDFAs. The Jets’ scouts and quick thinking nab an absolute steal here.

Mike Shanahan, TE/WR, Pitt
6’5 241

Mike Shanahan, no not that Mike Shanahan (no relation), is a terrific addition to the Jets. He has a tight end’s body but the athleticism to play WR at Pitt and do very well. He isn’t overly explosive or athletic, but he gets it done and with a 6’5 frame can really challenge smaller defensive backs and safeties. A very good high school basketball player Shanahan should be able to box out corners in the red zone.

Ryan Spadola, WR, Lehigh
6’1 204

Spadola is fast and will challenge for one of the last wide receiver position or be a great gunner and special teamer. He surprised many with his consistency in basic catching drills (gauntlet) at the Combine.

Chris Pantale, TE, Boston College
6’5 256

Not a standout athlete but he was productive and solid as a blocker and receiver for the Eagles. He has very good size and is a natural mover running routes. With how desperate the Jets are at TE he could easily be in the mix to start.

Zach Rogers, WR, Tennessee
6’0 182

He isn’t a stellar athlete, but I would be surprised if he doesn’t make the roster and see some time on Sundays in 5 WR sets as a slot specialist. He is crafty and gets open and ran a 4.49 at his Pro day. At times, Rogers proved to be as effective in the Tennessee passing game as highly touted teammates Justin Hunter and Cordarrelle Patterson. Roger’s athleticism, once again, won’t blow you away. However, you could argue that he will adjust to the speed of the NFL much easier than his former teammates, as he’s much more polished in regards to catching ability. Rogers is also consistently called one of the smartest players on the team. His smarts are evident in his sideline awareness and his technical routes. I (Mike), am definitely labeling Rogers as the Jets’ UDFA signing with the most potential to make an impact in the future.

KJ Stroud, WR, Bethune-Cookman
6’3 205

Stroud is very intriguing. In 2012, he only caught 26 passes for 286 yards, but his impressive workout numbers, including a 4.4 second forty time, caught scouts’ attention, anyways. Most reports say that he was never fully healthy in 2012, as well.

Mark Popek, OG, South Florida
6’7 308

A team leader and rock of the Bulls offensive line Popek is a developmental OG/OT with good leadership and intangibles. A coaches favorite is always worth a shot, especially with his 6’7 frame and massive 11 inch hands.

Spencer Nealy, DT, Texas A&M
6’3 285

Nealy is a versatile having played defensive end and tackle for the Aggies. He is active and plays hard. From a talent perspective, there isn’t a whole lot to work with but could stick on the roster because of the scheme versatility and activity level. Nealy was often referred to as a major leader on his successful Texas A&M team.

Troy Davis, DE/OLB, UCF
6’2 251

NFLDraftScout.com via cbssports.com said “Davis first caught the attention of NFL teams with his pass-rushing skills, and then again with his 4.65-second 40-yard dash at UCF’s pro day. He enjoyed a very strong all-around workout, but the question is whether he’s a hybrid without a true position at 251 pounds.” I’m on board, especially because a hybrid defender always has a fit in a hybrid system like Rex’s. http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/p...724/troy-davis

Dalton Freeman, C, Clemson
6’5 291

Freeman is actually a draftable guy, but he plays center so there are a limited amount of teams willing to use a pick on the position. His Pro day was very impressive posting a third best 4.88 40 among all lineman and is clearly a good athletic. The question is can he improve on technique and gain more strength so he can anchor effectively in the trenches.

Trey Gilleo, OT, Northern Arizona
6’7 309

The Northern Arizona Lumberjack is from Kingman, Arizona and has a criminal justice degree. That certainly sounds tough to me, and at 6’7 309 pounds he does have an NFL frame. He looks to be a practice squad body and developmental project.

Antavious Wilson, WR, Marshall
6’1 198

If you were looking to watch Aaron Dobson (New England’s 2nd rounder) in 2012 you likely came away saying “who is that #9 at WR”? He outperformed his more physically gifted teammate and the “quicker than fast” (ran a 4.62) and “sneaky good athlete” clichés fit well.

Roosevelt Holliday, DT, Eastern Illinois
6’2 307

He looks to be a very fluid athlete and aggressive tackler. It’s a little hard to tell with grainy film and less than stellar competition because I see some potential a defensive line savant like Rex came draw from. We’ve seen one Eastern Illinois Panthers make a name for themself: Tony Romo, Sean Payton, Mike Shanahan, Brad Childress and the late Mike Heimerdinger. Plus actor John Malkovich. Not a bad list!

Jake McDonough, DT, Iowa St
6’5 305

Our friend at NEPatriotsDraft.com James Christenson wrote on his game versus Iowa: “McDonough destroyed Iowa center James Ferentz for the majority of the night, swatting down balls and disrupting plays in the backfield. He has the ability to be a good rotational lineman at the next level.” Again, I’m on board with that. For the full review visit click here.

Alex Dunnachie, Punter, Hawaii
6’3 217

This punter become the second Jet on the roster to have Aussie bloodlines. He has a monster leg, evident by his 36 punts that notched over 50 yards over his first three season at Hawaii. The Jets give him a chance after he was suspended the first four games of 2012 due to a drunk driving arrest over the summer.

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JET80TV    8

yep i hear people say sometimes he looked better than Justin Hunter who was a 2nd round pick.

ive seen a few decent highlights. he has better speed than kerley, hes white and wore #83 @ tenn., 2nd coming of wes welker?

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gsnts725    1,961

Click here for reaction and analysis as we continue to update:

Mike Edwards, CB, Hawaii

5’9 189

Edwards is a talented corner who had some off field issues. He started at out as a Tennessee Vol and was a four star recruit. He was booted off the squab after he was charged with attempted robbery. As a player he gets very physical with receivers despite his short stature so that lack of height, while a major concern, is somewhat negated by that physicality. He should make the squad and could see time as a nickel corner or possibly return man. He saw some snaps at WR at Hawaii as well.

Rontez Miles, S, Cal (PA)

6’0 218

A small school stud with massive 10 (1/4) inch hands and good speed at 4.55-4.62 for a free safety Miles will add speed and athleticism to the practice squad at worst and push for time at best. He needs some development as he adjusts to NFL caliber competition. Miles can jump in and realistically compete for a starting job. The hybrid safety has some Johnathan Cyprien in him, as he is interchangeable at both safety positions. Miles was projected to go as high as the 5th round, was a top small-schooler all year, and was one of the most highly-sought after UDFAs. The Jets’ scouts and quick thinking nab an absolute steal here.

Mike Shanahan, TE/WR, Pitt

6’5 241

Mike Shanahan, no not that Mike Shanahan (no relation), is a terrific addition to the Jets. He has a tight end’s body but the athleticism to play WR at Pitt and do very well. He isn’t overly explosive or athletic, but he gets it done and with a 6’5 frame can really challenge smaller defensive backs and safeties. A very good high school basketball player Shanahan should be able to box out corners in the red zone.

Ryan Spadola, WR, Lehigh

6’1 204

Spadola is fast and will challenge for one of the last wide receiver position or be a great gunner and special teamer. He surprised many with his consistency in basic catching drills (gauntlet) at the Combine.

Chris Pantale, TE, Boston College

6’5 256

Not a standout athlete but he was productive and solid as a blocker and receiver for the Eagles. He has very good size and is a natural mover running routes. With how desperate the Jets are at TE he could easily be in the mix to start.

Zach Rogers, WR, Tennessee

6’0 182

He isn’t a stellar athlete, but I would be surprised if he doesn’t make the roster and see some time on Sundays in 5 WR sets as a slot specialist. He is crafty and gets open and ran a 4.49 at his Pro day. At times, Rogers proved to be as effective in the Tennessee passing game as highly touted teammates Justin Hunter and Cordarrelle Patterson. Roger’s athleticism, once again, won’t blow you away. However, you could argue that he will adjust to the speed of the NFL much easier than his former teammates, as he’s much more polished in regards to catching ability. Rogers is also consistently called one of the smartest players on the team. His smarts are evident in his sideline awareness and his technical routes. I (Mike), am definitely labeling Rogers as the Jets’ UDFA signing with the most potential to make an impact in the future.

KJ Stroud, WR, Bethune-Cookman

6’3 205

Stroud is very intriguing. In 2012, he only caught 26 passes for 286 yards, but his impressive workout numbers, including a 4.4 second forty time, caught scouts’ attention, anyways. Most reports say that he was never fully healthy in 2012, as well.

Mark Popek, OG, South Florida

6’7 308

A team leader and rock of the Bulls offensive line Popek is a developmental OG/OT with good leadership and intangibles. A coaches favorite is always worth a shot, especially with his 6’7 frame and massive 11 inch hands.

Spencer Nealy, DT, Texas A&M

6’3 285

Nealy is a versatile having played defensive end and tackle for the Aggies. He is active and plays hard. From a talent perspective, there isn’t a whole lot to work with but could stick on the roster because of the scheme versatility and activity level. Nealy was often referred to as a major leader on his successful Texas A&M team.

Troy Davis, DE/OLB, UCF

6’2 251

NFLDraftScout.com via cbssports.com said “Davis first caught the attention of NFL teams with his pass-rushing skills, and then again with his 4.65-second 40-yard dash at UCF’s pro day. He enjoyed a very strong all-around workout, but the question is whether he’s a hybrid without a true position at 251 pounds.” I’m on board, especially because a hybrid defender always has a fit in a hybrid system like Rex’s. http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/p...724/troy-davis

Dalton Freeman, C, Clemson

6’5 291

Freeman is actually a draftable guy, but he plays center so there are a limited amount of teams willing to use a pick on the position. His Pro day was very impressive posting a third best 4.88 40 among all lineman and is clearly a good athletic. The question is can he improve on technique and gain more strength so he can anchor effectively in the trenches.

Trey Gilleo, OT, Northern Arizona

6’7 309

The Northern Arizona Lumberjack is from Kingman, Arizona and has a criminal justice degree. That certainly sounds tough to me, and at 6’7 309 pounds he does have an NFL frame. He looks to be a practice squad body and developmental project.

Antavious Wilson, WR, Marshall

6’1 198

If you were looking to watch Aaron Dobson (New England’s 2nd rounder) in 2012 you likely came away saying “who is that #9 at WR”? He outperformed his more physically gifted teammate and the “quicker than fast” (ran a 4.62) and “sneaky good athlete” clichés fit well.

Roosevelt Holliday, DT, Eastern Illinois

6’2 307

He looks to be a very fluid athlete and aggressive tackler. It’s a little hard to tell with grainy film and less than stellar competition because I see some potential a defensive line savant like Rex came draw from. We’ve seen one Eastern Illinois Panthers make a name for themself: Tony Romo, Sean Payton, Mike Shanahan, Brad Childress and the late Mike Heimerdinger. Plus actor John Malkovich. Not a bad list!

Jake McDonough, DT, Iowa St

6’5 305

Our friend at NEPatriotsDraft.com James Christenson wrote on his game versus Iowa: “McDonough destroyed Iowa center James Ferentz for the majority of the night, swatting down balls and disrupting plays in the backfield. He has the ability to be a good rotational lineman at the next level.” Again, I’m on board with that. For the full review visit click here.

Alex Dunnachie, Punter, Hawaii

6’3 217

This punter become the second Jet on the roster to have Aussie bloodlines. He has a monster leg, evident by his 36 punts that notched over 50 yards over his first three season at Hawaii. The Jets give him a chance after he was suspended the first four games of 2012 due to a drunk driving arrest over the summer.

Probably one of the more intriguing guys we've signed. He can probably challenge for a starting safety spot if any of the guys we have right now don't step up. 

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Thor99    409,993

Where did Tony Jefferson land?

On the east side, in a high rise apartment in the sky.

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